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Glynn Fairclough was jailed for 12 weeks during a hearing held at Sheffield Magistrates' Court held today, after he admitted to racially aggravated harassment against his neighbour

Glynn Fairclough was jailed for 12 weeks during a hearing held at Sheffield Magistrates’ Court held today, after he admitted to racially aggravated harassment against his neighbour

A Sheffield man, who tormented his neighbour by making monkey noises and displaying racist signs and dolls, has been put behind bars.

During this period, Fairclough, of Retford Road, Handsworth displayed signs that used racist language and a golly doll in a landing window that faced her house.

“There was clear planning. The defendant actually went out and bought a golly doll and intentionally placed it in his window,” said Kate Reikstina, prosecuting.

Ms Reikstina described how Fairclough, 52, also made monkey noises at the woman and left onions and rotting shrimp strewn all over her property.

She said police warned Fairclough to stop, thereby informing him of the ‘distress’ being caused to his neighbour, but he persisted in his abusive behaviour.

He was finally arrested by South Yorkshire Police on August 26.

In a victim personal statement read out in court, the woman described how Fairclough’s behaviour had caused her a great deal of stress and anxiety.

“It makes me worried to leave the house and I don’t want to go into the garden. I’ve even considered moving,” said the woman.

The court heard how Fairclough was jailed in 2011 for the harassment of his ex-wife.

He pleaded guilty to a charge of racially aggravated harassment without violence at a hearing held last month.

Joanne Robinson, defending, said: “He was cooperative with the police…he accepted a very large degree of what happened.

“He accepts that the language he used was unacceptable.”

She added: “What he would say is that most of these incidents happened while he was under the influence of alcohol.”

Ms Robinson told the court that Fairclough was in the process of moving into his girlfriend’s home in Bramley, and would therefore soon be living a ‘sizeable’ distance away from the complainant.

District Judge Paul Heeley jailed Fairclough for 12 weeks during this morning’s hearing.

“Your behaviour was deeply shocking and distressing. It’s appalling conduct, in my view,” said Judge Heeley, adding: “Your neighbour has a right to be treated with respect in her own home and to live her life in peace.”

Judge Heeley also granted a restraining order, banning Fairclough from contacting the complainant.

He said: “I must make it abundantly clear: if you display any signs aimed at the defendant I will treat that as conduct which puts you in breach of the restraining order.”

Judge Heeley said he was minded to order Fairclough to pay his victim compensation, but Ms Riekstina said the woman had not put in a claim for it.

Yorkshire Post.

A MAN who launched a spray paint attack on homeless man Michael Cash has today been sentenced to an 18 month community order.

Aaron Jones, of Balmoral Road, Middlesbrough, appeared at Teesside Magistrates Court today to face charges of common assault and criminal damage following the attack early last month.

The 33-year-old, who turned up for the hearing with his face hidden by a child’s Frankenstein mask, pleaded guilty to both charges.

Michael Cash, 32, was found dead in a cemetery three days after the assault which happened near Tesco Express in Normanby High Street, Middlesbrough.

Chairman of the bench Stephen Walker sentenced Jones to 18 month community order, 180 hours unpaid work and 20 hours of rehabilitation activity days. He was also ordered to pay £85 court cost, £85 victim surcharge and £100 compensation for the damage.

He said: “We have put this in the highest category of common assault, the reason being is that if the aggravating factors – it was a targeted attack with an element of premedication. He was a vulnerable victim and it was shared on social media.”

Cleveland Police said Mr Cash’s death was not treated as suspicious and was not connected with anything which happened on September 9 outside the store.

Police officers attended court today in case of a disturbance in the public gallery.
Northern Echo

Tobias Ruth has previous convictions for racially-motivated graffiti attacks

A Torquay man who once plotted a nationwide hate campaign could be sent back to prison after being found with a prohibited weapon.

Tobias Ruth, 23, has become obsessed with knives and weapons, Exeter Crown Court was told.

He admitted two weapon-related offences when he appeared at the court for a short hearing.

The court was told he had adapted a fly swat into a stun gun and had a .22 air rifle.

Mr Kevin Hopper, defending, said Ruth had become ‘somewhat obsessed’ with collecting knives and weapon paraphernalia.

But he said the weapons had not been used in any crime and the electric fly swat did not work.

“He had no intention of using it on anyone,” said Mr Hopper

The defendant, formerly of Walnut Road but appearing via video link from custody, pleaded guilty to possessing a prohibited weapon on August 7 and possessing a firearm when prohibited.

Judge David Evans said he wanted Ruth to speak to the probation service before sentencing him.

He said all options, including immediate imprisonment, would be considered.

He adjourned sentence to October 25.

Ruth was just 18 when he and a friend carried out a campaign of racist vandalism in Torquay in 2012.

They styled themselves as Knights Templar and studied the crimes of Norweigian mass murderer Anders Breivik.

Their arrest led to houses being evacuated and roads cordoned off.

Ruth admitted conspiracy to send malicious messages and conspiracy to cause criminal damage. He was jailed for 33 months.

The judge at the time said the communications were intended to cause the fear of racial violence and plainly had a racial element.

Devon Live

You can read about his 2012 conviction here

A booze-fuelled thug who punched a friend through a broken window has told a court that he blamed alcohol for his bad behaviour.

Chesterfield magistrates’ court heard on September 13 how Liam Cooper, 31, of Cornwall Drive, Brimington, Chesterfield, was arrested by police after the attack at the Butcher’s Arms, at Brimington, Chesterfield.

Prosecuting solicitor Emma Price said: “It was August 22 in the early hours of the morning when officers were called after a report that the defendant had smashed a window and they arrived and saw he was under the influence of alcohol.

“They tried to stop him speaking to others and he was trying to get away and he had to be restrained.”

Mrs Price added that Cooper was being aggressive and he was removed from the pub and as the complainant was trying to calm him down he was punched threw a window and the glass was smashed.

Cooper screamed and swore and threatened police when they arrived, according to Mrs Price, and he had to be taken to the ground and restrained.

The defendant complained that the complainant had been goading him from behind the pub window and he had reacted and he was sorry for what he had done.

Mrs Price added that the defendant also told one of the officers that he was going to break his nose.

Cooper later told police that he blamed his behaviour on alcohol and he claimed that he did not behave that way normally.

The defendant, who has previous convictions from between 2005 to 2011 including public order offences, pleaded guilty to damaging a window, using threatening behaviour towards a police officer and admitted the assault.

Defence solicitor Felicity Coats said: “He’s remained out of trouble for the last seven years. There are similar offences on his record but he has done a lot to change.”

Mrs Coats added that Cooper had not intended to cause the assault but he did so when he punched the window in temper.

She said: “The gentleman in the pub is a long-standing friend he’s known for years and they have made-up.”

The court heard that the defendant, who has paid for the damage caused, suffers from a head injury which affects his ability to control his temper.

He said: “I have changed. I have been a bit of a lunatic when I was younger. I have apologised to the police and I was out of order but drink is a dangerous thing. I do not know how it is legal. That is why I don’t drink usually because that’s what happens to me.”

Magistrates fined Cooper £240 and ordered him to pay a £30 victim surcharge, £85 costs and £125 compensation.

Cooper added: “That was a dear night wasn’t it?”

Derbyshire Times

A racist neighbour who placed a racist doll, vile messages and a camera in the window of his Sheffield home has been warned he could face jail.

Glynn Fairclough, of Retford Road, Handsworth, admitted charges of harrassment and racially aggravated harrassment at Sheffield Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday.

The court heard he placed racist messages and a golly doll in his landing window facing the home of his neighbour.

He also threw litter and empty cans into her home over a period of 10 weeks between June and August this year.

Fairclough, 52, pleaded guilty to both charges and District Judge Paul Healey warned him he could face prison.

Judge Healey said: “You subjected the victim to a torrent of racist abuse over a period of time. Because you are charged with racially aggravated element to the offending I am allowed to commit the case to the Crown Court.

“You have a real risk of facing an immediate prison sentence.”

Judge Healey adjourned sentencing for three weeks so that a pre-sentence report can be prepared.

Fairclough was released on conditional bail until his next appearance on October 17.
Sheffield Star

POMPEY football thugs who terrorised Portsmouth city centre ahead of a Plymouth game were shown no mercy by a judge who threw eight hooligans behind bars for a total of nearly 10 years.

The gang of 16 defendants, who appeared at Portsmouth Crown Court throughout the week, were clinging to the hope they may be spared jail for their violent disorder before the League Two clash in April last year.

Stills from body-worn police cameras during violence before the Pompey-Plymouth game in 2017. 'Eight men have now been jailed.

Stills from body-worn police cameras during violence before the Pompey-Plymouth game in 2017. ‘Eight men have now been jailed.

But those hopes were crushed for half of them as one by one they were sent down.

Despite lengthy running battles against police in Guildhall Square and clashes with Plymouth fans, including where one was repeatedly booted like a football, things could have been far worse.

Sentencing the group, Judge Timothy Mousley said: ‘It is a matter of luck there were no serious injuries especially to the man on the floor getting kicked.’

Robbie Fowler, 22, of April Square, Landport, was handed the longest jail term out of the hooligans after he was given two years behind bars and a six year football banning order.

Judge Mousley told Fowler, who was serving a four year banning order at the time, he was the ‘most prominent among the group’ with him seen ‘limbering up’ to fight. Chief among his offences in amongst the constant violent disorder were him kicking out at a police dog and trying to get a policeman to fight him.

Matthew Allinson, 33, of Frogmore Lane, Waterlooville was given 18 months jail and a six year football banning order.

Richard Hampshire, 26, of Tudor Crescent, was given 14 months custody and a six year football banning order.

Ryan Keating, 19, of Oxenwood Green, Havant, was given 13 months in a young offenders institute and a six year football banning order.

Anthony Hopkins, 22, of Langley Road, Buckland, was given 12 months prison and a six year football banning order.

Tommy Russell, 20, of Appleshaw Green, Havant, received 12 months at a young offenders institute and a six year banning order.

Harley Hawkins, 19, of Whitecliffe Avenue, Copnor, was handed the same sentence.

Sean Mitchell, 46, of Chaucer Drive, Chichester, was handed 14 months prison and a six year football banning order.

Simon Hore, 33, of Medina Road, Cosham, was given 13 months prison suspended for 18 months, 250 hours unpaid work, compensation of £250 to Pompey and a four year football banning order.

Louis Glasspool received the same sentence but was given 10 months at a young offenders institute suspended for 18 months.

Harry Jarvie, 21, of Manor Road, Buckland also received the same but was given 12 months jail suspended for 18 months.

Connor Bowen, 19, of Lower Farlington Road, Farlington, was handed eight months in a detention centre suspended for 18 months, was given 250 hours unpaid work, 20 rehabilitation days, told to pay Pompey £250 and given a four year football banning order.

Tommy Houlden, 19, of Hayling Avenue, Copnor, was given the same as Bowen but was given 15 months at a detention centre suspended for 18 months and 15 rehabilitation days.

Asa Palmer, 23, of Sea View Road, Drayton, got nine months jail suspended for 18 months, 250 hours unpaid work, 20 rehabilitation days, told to pay compensation of £250 and a four year football banning order.

Jack Stobart, 23, of April Square, Landport, was given 12 months jail suspended for 18 months, 250 hours unpaid work, a four year football banning order and told to pay Pompey £250.

Shane Bartram, 26, of Goodwood Road, Southsea, got 12 months prison suspended for 18 months, as well as 250 hours unpaid work, told to pay £250 compensation and a four year banning order.
Portsmouth News

Jason Chrisp is facing prison after worried residents in Arthur’s Hill reported him shouting and swearing while holding an axe

A man is facing jail after being caught with a weapon in a Newcastle street for the third time in a decade.

Jason Chrisp, who has previous convictions for possessing a bottle of ammonia and a knife, was reported to police after concerned residents on Tamworth Road, in Arthur’s Hill, saw him “shouting and swearing” while holding an axe, a court heard.

Officers attended the scene on July 29 and searched the 29-year-old but, at first, no weapon was found.

However, drunk Chrisp soon confessed that he had been carrying an axe and disclosed that he’d hidden it under a nearby parked van, magistrates were told.

Now, Chrisp, of Gainsborough Grove, in Arthur’s Hill, has been warned he faces a prison sentence after he pleaded guilty to possessing an offensive weapon in a public place.

Rebecca Gibson, prosecuting at North Tyneside Magistrates’ Court, said; “Police attended Tamworth Road in relation to a report of a male walking up and down the street, shouting and swearing and holding an axe.

“A police officer arrives and he became aware of a male matching the description of the suspect.”

The court heard that Chrisp, who was behaving in an “animated manner” and had a cut to the back of his head, was immediately detained and searched but no weapon was found.

“After a short time, the defendant disclosed that he had been in possession of an axe in the street having been attacked by a group of males earlier that day,” Mrs Gibson added.

Chrisp then showed the officer where he’d hidden the weapon and he was arrested.

The court was told that Chrisp was convicted in 2007 of possessing ammonia in public and in 2012 of possessing a knife.

Because of his past convictions, magistrates deemed that their powers of sentence were insufficient and Chrisp was released on bail to next appear at Newcastle Crown Court on October 9.

Chrisp’s solicitor, Tony Malia, said that full mitigation would be heard on that occasion.

Newcastle Chronicle