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COVENTRY killer Andrew Luke Henson was today starting an eight- year jail sentence for the drugs-related shooting of a man in a city pub.

A jury at Birmingham Crown Court unanimously cleared self-confessed drugs dealer Henson of murder but found him guilty of manslaughter on the basis of provocation because he was being assaulted with knives and bottles at the time.

Lee Michael Moore and Paul Trevor Case, who were jointly charged along with Henson of murder, were acquitted.

The jury took a little less than three hours to agree on their verdict and reject the claim that the three had plotted to kill Richard Waring, of Potters Green, Coventry.

Father-of-two Mr Waring was shot in the back with a sawn-off shotgun in the Crow in the Oak pub in Lockhurst Lane, Foleshill, on January 29 last year.

Jailing Henson, Judge Michael Astill said: “The evidence clearly shows you were subjected to a violent and vicious attack by others. It was a concerted attack when you were defenceless and alone. You reacted by losing your self control.”

Henson, aged 26, of Kingfield Road, Foleshill, was being beaten by a group of men in the pub when Mr Moore and Mr Case arrived to meet him.

Mr Moore was carrying a sawn-off shotgun retrieved from under the floorboards of his home in Guild Road, Foleshill. He claimed he brought it at the request of Henson who was going to pass it on to a criminal contact.

Mr Case took the gun and held it in the air to try to stop the attack on his friend. Henson tossed aside a bar stool he was using to fend off bottles and blows, grabbed the gun and shot Mr Waring, who was leaving the pub.

Although Mr Waring’s friends were attacking Henson, the court heard he was not involved.

Afterwards all three went on the run, claiming they feared reprisal attacks, but were arrested a few days later.

The judge recorded not guilty verdicts against Mr Moore, aged 26, and Mr Case, aged 32, of Cheylesmore, in relation to a further offence of possessing a firearm with intent to endanger life. The same charge against Henson was allowed to lie on the file.

After the hearing Det Supt Barrie Simpson, who led the investigation, said: “It is another case where drugs and firearms have cost a life. We must continue the effort to combat drugs and firearms in the West Midlands.”

Free Library

From 2000

Thanks to Lee Garrett for the tip off.

A sex offender escaped from a care centre and fled to Spain, shortly after being spotted applying for his first passport, a judge heard.

Twenty-year-old Jordan Goodwin, also known as Jordan Hagan, stuffed pillows under the covers of his bed to give the impression he was sleeping, Wolverhampton Crown Court heard.

Then he forced open a secure window and ran away from the Huntercombe Centre in Underhill Street, Langley, that caters for people with mental health problems, on March 13.

He left a letter of explanation at the home of his partner and flew out of the country, said Mr Andrew Tucker, prosecuting.

He added: “He got to Spain but was arrested pretty quickly.

“A number of weeks earlier he had been seen filling in a passport application form and when asked why came up with some innocuous reason.”

But Judge Amjad Nawaz asked: “What other purpose could there be for a passport?”

The defendant had been made the subject of an indefinite hospital order at Derby Crown Court in 2011 after committing a serious sexual offence at the age of 12, it was said.

A European Arrest Warrant was issued four days after he vanished and, on March 24, he was flown from Madrid to Birmingham.

He was then detained by police at the airport on landing.

Mr Simon Hanns, defending, said: “There was some element of planning but whether the authorities should have been aware of this is another matter.

“He feels that the hospital order is no longer appropriate and he should now be back in society.”

Goodwin admitted escaping from custody and was given six months detention in a Young Offenders Institution.

However, he had already spent more than half the term in custody waiting for the case to be resolved.

That meant he was eligible for immediate release and could be transferred to a secure unit in Northamptonshire to continue his treatment.

Judge Nawaz told him: “You feel you are being dealt with unfairly by still being held on the hospital order but that is a matter for professionals and a tribunal to decide.

“I am keeping the sentence short to allow you to return to this order because that is in the best interest of, not just you, but also the general public.”

Express & Star.

From 2017

Thank to making-of-a-nazi on Twitter



A man who amassed an arsenal of weapons including explosives, knives and rocket mortars has been jailed for 30 months.

Simon Flint was arrested after a row with youths near Bishop Auckland, County Durham, in June in which he pointed a loaded crossbow at them.

He had earlier admitted affray and possessing a prohibited weapon.

Teesside Crown Court heard the 42-year-old, of Meadowfield Drive, Eaglescliffe, had a fixation with weapons.

After his arrest, police searched a camper van in which he was living and found a “significant collection” of weapons, which also included swords, pepper spray and chemicals that could be used to make improvised explosive devices.

Jolyon Perks, prosecuting, told the court police searched his electronic devices and found videos of him blowing up an apple, a cucumber and a laptop computer.

He told police he thought the effect was “hilarious”, but he understood it may be illegal.

The court heard he told officers he had a fascination with “making things go bang”.

‘Unorthodox interests’

Flint had got into a row with some youths and when a dog walker went to be a peace-maker, the defendant pointed his crossbow at them, Mr Perks said.

Mr Perks said Flint was found to possess a number of stab vests, adding: “I think these acquisitions stem from a skewed sense of his need to defend himself.”

Mark Styles, defending, said: “His unorthodox interests have led to the situation he is now in.

“We have to concede he is certainly eccentric but he is not mentally ill.”

Judge Howard Crowson jailed him for two-and-a-half years, giving Flint credit for his guilty pleas.

Outside court, Gary Fotherill of the Crown Prosecution Service said: “Flint appears to have been motivated by a compulsion to master the technical process of constructing improvised explosive devices and to use these to blow up inanimate objects for his own entertainment.”

BBC News

A MAN has pleaded guilty to a number of charges in connection with the possession of weapons and explosive making equipment.

Simon Flint had a huge collection of weapons, including more than 100 knives, improvised explosive crossbow bolts and a catalogue of components to build his own bombs, including potential pipe bombs.

The 42-year-old was due to stand trial this morning after being charged with seven offences following a police operation in Bishop Auckland on Friday, June 28.

However, this morning he pleaded guilty to three charges – affray and two charges of possession of explosive substances. He had already pleaded guilty to a number of offences at Durham Crown Court.

olyon Perks, prosecuting, said the defendant accepted that he had acquired the parts needed to construct an improvised explosive device.

He added that the defendant used improvised devices to blow up fruit and a laptop computer.

Mr Flint, who has an address at Meadowfield Drive, Eaglescliffe, but is understood to have lived in a campervan for a number of years, was charged with making threats to kill, possession of an explosive substance, two charges of possession of offensive weapons, possession of a weapon for the discharge of pepper spray, two charges of possession of a bladed article in public and a public order offence.

Among the items listed in the charges were three crossbows, a friction locking baton, lock knives and swords including one measuring 2ft long.

The precision engineer is also accused of possession of an explosive black powder, a weapon designed to discharge a noxious gas or liquid – namely pepper spray, and of using abusive, threatening or insulting words or behaviour to cause alarm.

Judge Howard Crowson adjourned the case for sentence and remanded Flint into custody.

He said: “We have admitted your offences and the next stage is sentencing but we will want to that right and it can be a little complicated, this piece of the law, so the lawyers are going to make sure they help me as much as they can and get this right.”

The youngest person to be convicted of planning a terrorist attack in the UK identified potential targets in his hometown, began drafting a “guerrilla warfare” manual and tried to obtain a chemical used in terrorist bombings. But the case also focused on the radicalisation process itself, hearing the 16-year-old’s preparations for an attack involved a deliberate effort to dehumanise himself and become like the “living dead”.

The teenager chronicled his regression in a journal, writing “at one point or another I can look back and see if I was any different.” Aged 14, he noted: “I wasn’t always a fascist, my red pilling process was slower than most”, adding that less than two years earlier he advocated “punk rock ideals and Marxism”.

The trial heard much about his ideology – an amalgam of neo-Nazism, Satanism and misanthropy, allied to the belief that a collapse of civilisation should be “accelerated” through acts of violence and criminality.

He was first interviewed by police in autumn 2017, when his school reported a Twitter account he used to express support for the outlawed British neo-Nazi group National Action and posed for a photo with ex-English Defence League leader, Tommy Robinson.

The boy, who cannot be identified because of his age, promised to close the profile and he spent time with the government de-radicalisation scheme, Prevent. But rather than moderating his behaviour, he set out to immerse himself in extreme right-wing literature and online networks.

“A fascist has an obligation to absorb a lot of words,” he recorded.

His immersion came at a time of exceptional depravity. National Action had been banned in 2016, but had generated several small British spin-offs, some of which sought to imitate the militant American group, Atomwaffen Division.

The origins of this network were in an online neo-Nazi forum, but by the time it closed in 2017 fascists from around the world were already migrating to new platforms. These digital spaces promote an increasingly berserk world view that proclaims hatred of all, worships a pantheon of “saints” comprising various terrorists and murderers, and demands a commitment to the destruction of society through so-called “accelerationism”.

Online channels can gain thousands of followers, all using a shared vocabulary and set of references, although there are disputes over people’s ideological commitment or supernatural beliefs, in which Adolf Hitler is often regarded as a divinity.

Central influences include the American neo-Nazi James Mason, who has been convicted of indecent images offences involving a child, and individuals associated with the occult organisation Order of Nine Angles – described by the prosecution as the “most prominent and recognisable link between Satanism and the extreme right”.

The result is a culture in which deviancy and criminality are encouraged – sexual violence and paedophilia are constant themes – with anything justified as long as it is thought to destabilise society and defy what is characterised as slavish morality.

The Durham teenager absorbed these ideas, reading any recommended books and discussing them in his journal, gradually following the logic of his ideology towards a planned attack. In October 2018, he wrote that earlier phases of his political activities, such as debating with others, had “accomplished nothing” and merely got him into trouble at school.

“And now here I am an accelerationist,” he added.

The boy actively sought to alter himself in line with the texts he read and included the instruction “shed empathy” on a list of things to do. He adopted an online pseudonym, speaking constantly with other neo-Nazis, telling a forum that his Satanic belief system involved programming oneself to lose any feelings of guilt – becoming the living dead in the process.

“I believe there is primal enjoyment to be had in sadism,” he wrote in his journal, stating: “How wonderful it is to be an amoral individual”.

He set his sights on his hometown of Durham, searching for synagogues and compiling a list of local places “worth attacking”. He collected explosives manuals and also tried to secure a dangerous chemical from a fellow extremist in the United States.

When the boy was arrested outside his home in March, detectives found a coded note in his pocket, saying: “Killing is probably easier than your paranoid mind thinks. You’re just not used to it. Most were caught because they got sloppy.”

At trial, the boy denied being a neo-Nazi, saying his writings were an extremist “alter ego” generated by feelings of social isolation and created in order to shock others and find a sense of belonging online. He told jurors his political beliefs were “centre right” and that he had a poster on his bedroom wall signed by Nigel Farage.

Prosecutors said the boy was lying to the jury about the fake “persona” and that his actions were not confined to diaries or the internet. They originally alleged that he sexually touched a child as part of his preparations for an attack, saying it was a deliberate “desensitisation technique”, although claims about his sexual conduct were ruled inadmissible during pre-trial hearings and will now be heard in a youth court.

Teenagers Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski and Michal Szewczuk pleaded guilty to terror offences

According to police, eight terrorist plots inspired by right-wing ideologies have been stopped since March 2017. They say there is a “spectrum” of such ideologies that have the potential to generate violence, with the variant adopted by the Durham defendant regarded as perhaps the most extreme of all.

He is now the fourth teenager to be convicted of terrorism offences in the UK over the past year, in which the same set of influences – accelerationism and Satanism – have been central.

One of the many troubling aspects of this case is that a child traversed the full spectrum of right-wing extremism before he had even left school.

BBC News

A FAR-RIGHT extremist who downloaded “sinister, violent and disturbing” terrorist material has been sentenced to an extended jail sentence.

David Dudgeon, 43, collected a range of disturbing books and videos featuring ISIS beheadings, material on Holocaust denial and how to make explosives.

The online material also contained an edition of the infamous The Anarchist Cookbook and referenced details on how to murder people by targeting vital organs with knives.

The manuals and videos showed techniques on how to smuggle bombs onto planes, the manufacture of black powder explosives and the use of biological weapons.

The terror-related collection included the titles Bloody Brazilian Knife Fighting, Prison Killing Techniques and Krav Maga Knife Attacks.

Dudgeon admitted possessing material useful to committing or preparing an act of terrorism over a six-year period when he appeared at Edinburgh Sheriff Court earlier this year.

He returned for sentencing today (Friday), where Sheriff Michael O’Grady QC told him he had found the case “concerning and unusual”.

Sheriff O’Grady said: “The websites you accessed and the material you gleaned from them were sinister, violent and disturbing.

“Due to the circumstances and the nature of the charge, I am bound to impose a custodial sentence.”

Dudgeon was jailed for two years backdated to April 1.

He will also be supervised for 12 months following his release from prison.

Previously, the court heard that Dudgeon, from McLachlan Gardens, Prestonpans, was caught after a meeting between him and his psychiatrist had raised “concerns he posed a threat to public safety”.

Police were contacted in March and officers attended at the extremist’s home with a search warrant three days later and confiscated various items of computer equipment.

Prosecutor Emma Mitchell said Dudgeon’s internet history showed he had visited websites of “an extreme right-wing nature” including Christian fundamentalism, ISIS murder videos and sites about former English Defence League founder Tommy Robinson.

The terror manuals were also said to include instructions on how to manufacture explosives, create biological weapons and how to inflict fatal and non-fatal blows using a knife.

The fiscal added that a series of terror booklets with titles including Knife Talk 1 – The Art and Science of Knife Making, Deadly Knife Fighting Techniques Revealed and Russian Knife Fighting Combat were all downloaded and accessed by Dudgeon on July 1, 2015.

Following a no comment police interview, Dudgeon was subsequently cautioned and charged under the Terrorism Act 2000.

Today, solicitor Lesley Cunningham, defending, said that her client had lived “a fairly isolated existence” and had been “struggling for some time with paranoid thoughts”.

Ms Cunningham added that Dudgeon had stopped taking his psychotic medication around the time he had downloaded the material and had only viewed it on the same day he had downloaded it.

The lawyer added that Dudgeon was prone to spending “up to 12 hours a day online” and had become “fixated on conspiracy theories”.

Dudgeon pleaded guilty to possessing material useful to committing or preparing an act of terrorism, namely a quantity of texts, manuals, booklets, leaflets and video files relating to the production of chemical and biological weapons and techniques for knife fighting.

He also admitted possessing electronic copies of various terror-related documents at his home address between March 6, 2013, and March 29 this year.

A Police Scotland spokesperson said: “As a result of an investigation led by Police Scotland’s East Organised Crime and Counter Terrorism Unit, 43-year-old David Dudgeon was arrested at his home in Prestonpans on Thursday, March 28, 2019.

“He subsequently pled guilty to an offence under the Terrorism Act at Edinburgh Sheriff Court on Tuesday, June 25, and was remanded in custody until he was sentenced.

“We remain committed to keeping Scotland’s communities safe and will investigate any offences linked to terrorism with the utmost seriousness to bring those involved to justice.

“Police Scotland supports the national Action Counters Terrorism (ACT) campaign that aims to promote vigilance from our communities so that any activity that may be linked to terrorism can be reported to police and acted upon accordingly.

“Our advice in relation to these matters remains the same: be alert, not alarmed, but contact us immediately with any concerns you may have.

“Members of the public can report suspicious activity to the police by calling Police Scotland on 101 or by calling or visiting the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321 or gov.uk/ACT”

East Lothian Courier

Six individuals are the last in a group of 14 to be jailed for almost 18 years for their part in violent disorder in Whitehall on 9 June 2018.

The following pleaded guilty to violent disorder and were sentenced on Monday, 30 September:

– Mitchell Feneck, 21 (17.07.98) of Haverfordwest, Dyfed was sentenced to 10 months’ imprisonment.

– Max Hammet-Millay, 22 (9.05.97) of Wenlock Road, N1 was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment.

– Mark Ransome, 25 (7.02.94) of Romford Road, RM5 was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment.

– James Thomas, 28 (24.10.90) of Priory View Road, Burton, Dorset was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

– John Cummings, 49 (16.09.70) of Hunters Hall Road, Dagenham, Essex was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

– Charles Haig, 24 (22.03.95) of East Street, Seaford, East Sussex was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment.

An additional eight defendants were sentenced on Friday, 27 September having previously pleaded guilty to violent disorder. They are:

– Danny Grealey, 43 (28.06.76) of Ebberns Road, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

– Kate Beveridge, 35 (04.04.84) of Pool Foot Lane, Singleton, Lancashire was sentenced to 15 months, suspended for 18 months, and was ordered to carry out 200 hours of unpaid work.

– Robert Sandford, 47 (27.11.71) of Bolton Road, Hungerhill, Bolton was sentenced to 14 months’ imprisonment.

– Keith O’Sullivan, 40 (22.04.79) of Holmstead Way, Luton was sentenced to 23 months’ imprisonment.

– Andrew McLean, 20 (18.11.98) of Field Street, Wolverhampton was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

– David Anderson, 23 (06.05.95) of Moraine Drive, Glasgow was sentenced to 14 months’ imprisonment.

– Kai Smith, 19 (09.10.99) of Middleton Close, London, E4 was sentenced to 15 months’ imprisonment.

– Carl Gustav Backland, 59 (14.11.59) of Grafton Way, Camden was sentenced to nine months’ imprisonment.

On 9 June 2018, serious disorder broke out at a ‘Free Tommy Robinson’ demonstration in Whitehall. Scaffolding, glass bottles and items of street furniture, including heavy barriers, were thrown at police. More than 20 officers suffered injuries. Serious disruption was caused to members of the public, local businesses and the local community as a result.

Operation Augusta was launched by the Met to bring those involved in the disorder to justice.

Detective Sergeant Matt Hearing, who led the Operation Augusta team, said: “This investigation proved extremely challenging with hundreds of hours of CCTV, video and Body Worn Video to examine. However, such was the weight of evidence brought against those charged, that all pleaded guilty.

“Peaceful protest plays an important role in our society. However, the actions of some involved in this demonstration showed a contempt both for the law and the police. Officers that day were there to ensure the safety of all those taking part, yet were met with abuse and violence.”

Robert Hutchinson, prosecutor from the London CPS complex casework unit, said: “The terrifying disorder wreaked by these individuals in the heart of London on 9 June 2018, was inexcusable. Protestors set out to intimidate and hurt police, injuring more than 20 officers who were protecting the public and tourists in Central London on the day of Trooping of the Colour, and who should have been able to go about their duties without fear of violence.

“This was a complex case and has involved exceptionally close liaison with the police from an early stage to determine appropriate charges that reflected the seriousness of their crimes. The strong case we built ultimately left the defendants with no choice but to plead guilty.

“The sentences passed should serve as a warning that those who direct violence towards police and act in this way will face prosecution and potentially prison.”

Met Police

*** Note *** We have been asked to point out that Carl Gustav Backland is not a member of the far-right and was caught up in the violence on the day whilst trying to get to the counter protest.

Eight individuals involved in violent disorder which took place in Whitehall on 9 June 2018, have been sentenced at Southwark Crown Court, having pleaded guilty to violent disorder, contrary to section 2 of the Public Order Act 1986.

They were sentenced on Friday, 27 September as follows:

Danny Grealey, 43 (28.06.76) of Ebberns Road, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

Kate Beveridge, 35 (04.04.84) of Pool Foot Lane, Singleton, Lancashire was sentenced to 15 months, suspended for 18 months, and was ordered to carry out 200 hours of unpaid work.

Robert Sandford, 47 (27.11.71) of Bolton Road, Hungerhill, Bolton was sentenced to 14 months’ imprisonment.

Keith O’Sullivan, 40 (22.04.79) of Holmstead Way, Luton was sentenced to 23 months’ imprisonment.

Andrew McLean, 20 (18.11.98) of Field Street, Wolverhampton was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

David Anderson, 23 (06.05.95) of Moraine Drive, Glasgow was sentenced to 14 months’ imprisonment.

Kai Smith, 19 (09.10.99) of Middleton Close, London, E4 was sentenced to 15 months’ imprisonment.

Carl Gustav Backland, 59 (14.11.59) of Grafton Way, Camden was sentenced to nine months’ imprisonment.

A further six individuals will be sentenced on Monday, 30 September.

On 9 June 2018, serious disorder broke out at a ‘Free Tommy Robinson’ demonstration in Whitehall. Scaffolding, glass bottles and items of street furniture, including heavy barriers, were thrown at police. More than 20 officers suffered injuries. Serious disruption was caused to members of the public, local businesses and the local community as a result.

Operation Augusta was launched by the Met to bring those involved in the disorder to justice.

Detective Sergeant Matt Hearing, who led the Operation Augusta team, said: “This investigation proved extremely challenging with hundreds of hours of CCTV, video and Body Worn Video to examine. However, such was the weight of evidence brought against those charged, that all pleaded guilty.

“Peaceful protest plays an important role in our society. However, the actions of some involved in this demonstration showed a contempt both for the law and the police. Officers that day were there to ensure the safety of all those taking part, yet were met with abuse and violence.”

Robert Hutchinson, prosecutor from the London CPS complex casework unit, said: “The terrifying disorder wreaked by these individuals in the heart of London on 9 June 2018, was inexcusable. Protestors set out to intimidate and hurt police, injuring more than 20 officers who were protecting the public and tourists in Central London on the day of Trooping of the Colour, and who should have been able to go about their duties without fear of violence.

“This was a complex case and has involved exceptionally close liaison with the police from an early stage to determine appropriate charges that reflected the seriousness of their crimes. The strong case we built ultimately left the defendants with no choice but to plead guilty.

“The sentences passed today should serve as a warning that those who direct violence towards police and act in this way will face prosecution and potentially prison.”

+ The following are due to be sentenced on Monday, 30 September:

– Mark Ransome, 25 (07.02.94) of Romford Road, Romford.
– James Thomas, 28 (24.10.90) of Priory View Road, Burton, Christchurch, Dorset.
– Max Millay-Hammet, 22 (09.05.97) of Wenlock Road, N1.
– Charles Haig, 24 (22.03.95) of East Street, Seaford, East Sussex.
– John Cummings, 49 (16.09.70) of Hunters Hall Road, Dagenham, Essex.
– Mitchell Fenwick, 21 (17.07.98) of Glebelands, Haverfordwest, Dyfed.
Met Police

A Tommy Robinson supporter cried as she was spared jail over her role in an afternoon of “disgraceful violence” against police.

Kate Beveridge, a single mother of two and primary school cook, avoided immediate jail after she joined a violent pro-Robinson demonstration in which cans, traffic cones and various makeshift missiles were thrown.

She was handed a 15-month jail term, suspended for 18 months, and spared immediate custody because she is the sole carer of her children.

Beveridge, who was the only one of five defendants to be spared jail, was reportedly drunk when she threw a one litre plastic drinks bottle at police during the protest in central London in June 2018.

Three of the other defendants were jailed for violent disorder, while the youngest member of the group was sent to a young offenders institution.

At the sentencing, Judge Deborah Taylor told Beveridge: “You have two children aged 14 and two for whom you are the sole carer.

“You should think what sort of example you are setting your own children and the children at the primary school by the actions you carried out that day.”

The 35-year-old, from Singleton in Lancashire, wiped away tears as the judge told her she would be spared immediate custody at Southwark Crown Court.

Her counsel, Sheryl Nwosu, said: “She expresses not only sorrow but embarrassment and shame. She does not align herself with what went on that day.

“She acted on intoxicated impulse … this is a one-off.”

Danny Grealey, Keith O’Sullivan and Robert Sandford were jailed for violent disorder, while Andrew McLean, who is 20 years old, was sent to a young offenders institution.

The court heard how police were “overrun” by the disorder in the capital in June when thousands of people packed into Whitehall to demand Robinson’s release.

The former EDL leader was in prison for contempt of court at the time of the demonstration.

Prosecutor Aska Fujita said: “It turned ugly. The police have been constantly abused, missiles were thrown at them, they have been punched, kicked and had barriers thrown at them.

“The number of defendants does not reflect the actual occurrence of violence – police have tried incredibly hard to identify the people involved.

“However, out of a crowd of hundreds and thousands, it is impossible to identify everyone.”

She added that more than 20 police officers were injured, although there were no injuries more serious than cuts and bruises.

However, Ms Fujita insisted that this was only “due to sheer coincidence.”

“Each of the defendants were involved in serious acts of violence, including using weapons that could have caused serious injury,” she said.

The five defendants were the first of 14 defendants due to be sentenced for violent disorder during three hearings at the court.

Robinson was released from Belmarsh prison in southeast London a fortnight ago, two months into a nine-month sentence for contempt of court.

The Independent

William ‘Billy’ Charlton, of Washington, was branded a manipulative bully by a judge as he was locked up for stirring up racial hatred

Unrepentant racist bully Billy Charlton shouted at jurors “I hope your daughters don’t get raped” and gave his supporters the thumbs up as he was jailed for spreading his toxic lies in a series of public speeches.

Vile and manipulative Charlton hid behind the cloak of respectability of wanting to protect women and children from sexual assault but his true intention was to disseminate hate-filled falsehoods about immigrants, Asians, black people and the police.

The 55-year-old, of Byland Court, Glebe, Washington , was convicted on Thursday of five counts of stirring up racial hatred after a series of speeches in Sunderland.

He was brought back to Newcastle Crown Court on Friday to be sentenced and five members of the jury returned to watch the conclusion of the case.

After spending most of the hearing staring intently at them, he shouted the vile comment towards the four women and a man as he was led away to prison and was told by a judge: “Just leave Mr Charlton”.

He then clapped his hands and gave the thumbs up to his supporters in the public gallery, who clapped as he was taken out of the dock to start a 21 month jail sentence.

Judge Edward Bindloss told him: “Over this three-and-a-half week trial you have been revealed as an intelligent, articulate, skilled public speaker but also a manipulator and bully, in my judgement.”

The judge said Charlton had used an allegation of rape, kidnap and drugging by a female – which was investigated and which police found insufficient evidence of – to spread his racist lies.

“You propelled the campaign (for the female) with rhetoric and misrepresentation and, the jury has found, with racist hatred,” Judge Bindloss said.

Charlton had been warned by senior police officers the comments he was making about the female were wrong, counter-productive and doing damage to the community.

Despite the fact more than 80% of sexual offending in Sunderland was committed by white men, the judge said: “In the five speeches, you conflated all immigrants with rapes and sexually offending, thus peddling racist hatred basted around falsehoods.”

The five speeches took place between November 2016 and July 2017 and drew bigger and bigger crowds, forcing hundreds of police officers to be diverted from their usual duties.

At one event, 800 people were present, including 32 Hells Angels.

Judge Bindloss told him: “Time and again you associated immigrants with sexual offending. This is a pernicious form of racial hatred.”

The judge said freedom of speech is a “fundamental freedom” and told him Charlton: “This is not about politics, it’s about the law. I’ve sought to keep the law and politics separate.

“You are not on trial for your political views or being a member of any party.

“Even your anti-imimigration views, you are entitled to hold.

“The jury has found your speeches were intended to or likely to stir up racial hatred.

“The speeches contributed to a toxic atmosphere by you stirring up racial hatred.”

The court heard that while Charlton was not responsible for them, a number of race-hate incidents were happening in Sunderland around the time of the speeches.

An Asian family had a brick thrown through their window with a note attached containing racist abuse and signed “EDL forever”.

Racist graffiti also appeared and a man was arrested wearing a T-shirt with an anti-Muslim T-shirt slogan.

The court heard Charlton had a previous conviction from 2007 for racially aggravated harassment, for which he was fined.

During his trial, jurors were told about footage from a “white man march” on Newcastle Quayside at which Charlton spoke.

The footage showed other people chanting things such as “white power”, “Hitler was right” “sieg heil” and “keep it white”, the court heard.

At one of the events, Charlton appeared alongside far right extremist Tommy Robinson.

Charlton also made sickening references to the Grenfell Tower fire – saying “it’s not cheap cladding that raped (a female)” and adding it’s “immigrants who are a threat to our children”.

Glenn Gatland, defending, said Charlton had what he considered to be genuine concerns and frustrations which had “boiled over into what can only be described by the jury as racism” and had “overstepped the mark”.

Mr Gatland added: “It’s not a case like Abu Hamza where people are preaching outright hatred on the grounds of racism.

“It starts with a genuine complaint and concern. There are genuine concerns about what he perceives to be a cover up by the police, rightly or wrongly.”

Mr Gatland added that Charlton is “not in particularly good health”, had to give up work because of problems with his knees and will find prison difficult.

He added: “He is extremely upset his 92-year-old mother is not very well, she will not be able to visit him.”

After the case, Chief Inspector Sam Rennison, of Northumbria Police, said Charlton’s actions were an attempt to fuel “hatred and unrest” in the city.

“Freedom of speech is an important element of modern society which we all advocate, but spreading hate and racism is totally unacceptable,” Ch Insp Rennison said.

“Billy Charlton attempted to disguise his racist agenda under a cloak of respectability by claiming to want to protect the women of Sunderland.

“He knowingly targeted a number of ethnic groups and immigrants at high-profile marches in the city centre, and in doing so, stirred up hatred.

“He then pushed that personal agenda further by circulating misinformation on social media for his own gain.

“However, today his calculated behaviour and attempts to spread hatred and unrest in our community have been laid bare.

“We must do all we can to stamp out racism and the spreading of hate. As a Force, we are committed to tackling all forms of extremism which has the potential to threaten the safety and security of the public.

“I am glad that the jury understood and recognised the seriousness of Charlton’s crimes, and he must now deal with the consequences of his actions.”

The Chronicle