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Police searching Peter Morgan’s flat also found an IRA volunteers’ handbook on guerilla warfare, a Ku Klux Klan application form and an Al Qaeda terrorism manual.

Police searching Peter Morgan's Edinburgh flat found bomb-making equipment and far-right literature (Image: Police/Daily Record)

Police searching Peter Morgan’s Edinburgh flat found bomb-making equipment and far-right literature (Image: Police/Daily Record)

A right-wing extremist who was caught with a bomb making kit after emergency services rushed to his home answering a 999 call has been jailed.

Police called in to search 35-year-old Peter Morgan’s flat after a woman collapsed found a glass bottle studded with lead shot and nail gun rounds along with explosive powder, fuses, screws and steel tacks.

An Army bomb disposal expert told the High Court in Edinburgh that a “quite effective, viable” improvised explosive device (IED) could have been made from the items discovered.

Sergeant Liam Davies told prosecution lawyer Ashley Edwards QC: “I believe that this is a bomb in construction or waiting to be constructed.”

The experienced explosive ordnance disposal soldier said the complicated weapon could cause “horrific injury” with severe bleeding and potential death without prompt medical intervention.

He said the potential shrapnel glued to the exterior of the vinegar shaker was telling and if the screws and tacks were put in with an explosive mixture placed inside the bottle that would add to the fragmentation effect.

During the search of Morgan’s home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh, officers also found a Nazi swastika flag, far-right literature and a German World War II dagger.

Police also discovered he downloaded an international application form to become a “loyal white knight of the Klu Klux Klan.”

Morgan had also acquired copies of an Al Qaeda terrorism manual, an IRA volunteers’ handbook on guerilla warfare and works on turning guns into fully automatic weapons as well as guides on improvised explosives and interrogation techniques.

Jurors heard he was “quite proud” that he was part of the Scottish Defence League and travelled with others from the far right group to a white pride rally in Manchester in 2015.

 Peter Morgan, pictured at a white pride rally, had an Al Qaeda terrorism manual at his home (Image: Handout)

Peter Morgan, pictured at a white pride rally, had an Al Qaeda terrorism manual at his home (Image: Handout)

He was photographed attending the march with his hood up carrying a Scottish Saltire flag and holding a “white pride worldwide” poster.

The story emerged on Friday after Morgan, a prisoner of HMP Edinburgh, was convicted of charges under the Terrorism Act.

Jurors convicted Morgan of charges which stated he possessed items and collected information which give “rise to a reasonable suspicion” that he was planning “acts of terrorism.”

Morgan’s offending took place between April 2012 and July 2017.

Experts say a 'quite effective' bomb could have been made from the items at Peter Morgan's home

Experts say a ‘quite effective’ bomb could have been made from the items at Peter Morgan’s home

Judge Lord Boyd remanded Morgan – who has convictions dating back two decades – in custody in order for the court to obtain reports about his character.

He said: “I could sentence you today but I prefer to obtain a full report about your background. I will refrain from making comments about the offences to which you have been convicted of.

“In the meantime, you will be remanded in custody.”

Morgan spent the trial denying any wrongdoing.

During proceedings, the jury heard that police and ambulance personnel had originally attended at the block of flats where Taylor lived on July 2 last year because a woman had collapsed and was found to have no pulse.

A resident said she previously saw the woman at Morgan’s flat and police decided to force entry because of concerns for others and a sergeant kicked the door in.

Fireworks and other bomb making equipment was found at Peter Morgan's Edinburgh flat

Fireworks and other bomb making equipment was found at Peter Morgan’s Edinburgh flat

No one was found in the flat at the time but officers noticed drugs paraphernalia such as needles and scales and the premises were secured. Morgan was later seen nearby.

Search officers were dispatched to the property and right-wing flags, leaflets and stickers were found. PC Paul Nicholson, 46, said as they searched drawers, the vinegar bottle, which had lead shot and cartridges glued to its outside, was found.

A large quantity of commercial fireworks were discovered some of which had been taken apart. A dagger bearing the symbol of an eagle mounted on a swastika was found under a sofa in the living room.

DC Murray Cairns, 44, said a decision was taken to seize items found in the flat with the assistance of military ordnance personnel.

A selection of fuses that Peter Morgan could have used to create a bomb

A selection of fuses that Peter Morgan could have used to create a bomb

He said a military expert viewed the items found in the bottom drawer of a chest of drawers and added: “He agreed it was potential component parts of an improvised explosive device.”

Computers taken from Morgan’s flat were analysed and it was found he had a PDF of the Turner Diaries , a novel seen as the bible of the racist right in America.

He was also found to have sent a message saying: “I just hate the f*****g Muslims. Don’t want any more of those f*****s up here.”

Morgan also said Muslims ‘p****d’ him off regardless of them being White, Black or Asian.

A military expert confirmed the items in Peter Morgan's home could make a bomb

A military expert confirmed the items in Peter Morgan’s home could make a bomb

When Morgan, who was on a prescription for the heroin substitute Methodone, was arrested, he said: “How can they get away with charging me for fireworks you can buy out of shops.

“It’s not like a bomb has been made out of them. It’s not like they have injured people.”

However, jurors concluded that Morgan was planning terrorism attacks.

Morgan will be sentenced at the High Court in Edinburgh on August 16, 2018.

Daily Record

A right-wing extremist who was caught with a bomb-making kit during an unrelated call-out to the death of a teenage woman in Edinburgh has been found guilty of terrorism offences.

Peter Morgan’s flat was searched on 5 July 2017 after a woman collapsed.

Police found a glass bottle studded with lead shot and nail gun rounds along with explosive powder, fuses, screws and steel tacks.

Morgan will be sentenced at the High Court in Edinburgh on 16 August 2018.

An Army bomb disposal expert told the High Court in Edinburgh that a “quite effective, viable” improvised explosive device (IED) could have been made from the items discovered.

Sgt Liam Davies told prosecution lawyer Ashley Edwards: “I believe that this is a bomb in construction or waiting to be constructed.”

The experienced explosive ordnance disposal soldier said the complicated weapon could cause “horrific injury” with severe bleeding and potential death without prompt medical intervention.

He said the potential shrapnel glued to the exterior of the vinegar shaker was telling and if the screws and tacks were put in with an explosive mixture placed inside the bottle that would add to the fragmentation effect.

During the search of Morgan’s home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh, officers also found a Nazi swastika flag, far-right literature and a German World War Two dagger.

Police also discovered he downloaded an international application form to become a “loyal white knight of the Klu Klux Klan”.

Morgan had also acquired copies of an Al Qaeda terrorism manual, an IRA volunteers handbook on guerrilla warfare and works on turning guns into fully automatic weapons as well as guides on improvised explosives and interrogation techniques.

Jurors heard he was “quite proud” he was part of the Scottish Defence League and travelled with others from the far-right group to a white pride rally in Manchester in 2015.

Jurors convicted Morgan of charges which stated he possessed items and collected information which give “rise to a reasonable suspicion” that he was planning “acts of terrorism.”

Morgan’s offending took place between April 2012 and July 2017.

Judge Lord Boyd remanded Morgan, who has convictions dating back two decades, in custody in order for the court to obtain reports about Morgan’s character.

Morgan had denied the charges.

During proceedings, the jury heard that police and ambulance personnel had originally attended at the block of flats where Taylor lived on July 2 last year because a woman had collapsed and was found to have no pulse.

A resident said she had previously seen the woman at Morgan’s flat and police decided to force entry because of concerns for others and a sergeant kicked the door in.

The flat was found to be empty but officers noticed drugs paraphernalia such as needles and scales and the premises were secured. Morgan was later seen nearby.

Search officers were dispatched to the property and right wing flags, leaflets and stickers were found.

BBC News

A man found in possession of explosive items and extreme right-wing paraphernalia has been convicted.

At Edinburgh High Court on Friday 13th July Peter Morgan was found guilty of two offences under the Terrorism Act 2000 and one offence under the Explosive Substances Act 1883 after police recovered items linked to the construction of an explosive device from his home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh.

Officers from the Organised Crime and Counter Terrorism Unit carried out a search of the house on 5th July 2017, supported by colleagues from the EOD.

A number of items, which could be used to construct a bomb were seized along with a number of phones and computer equipment.

Following analysis of the computer equipment and phones, it was established that 35-year-old Morgan had been researching racist content and information on constructing explosives.

Nazi flags and stickers and National Front literature was also found within the address.

Morgan was arrested and has been remanded in custody since 5th July 2017.

Detective Inspector Jackie Gilfillan from OCCTU said: “What our investigation established is that Peter Morgan’s interest in explosives, coupled with his extreme right-wing beliefs, made him a danger to not only himself, but the public.

“None of the items recovered from Morgan’s address had been made into any form of viable explosive and we were able to intervene before he could attempt to construct any device capable of doing harm.

“Whenever such individuals come to our attention, a thorough investigation will be undertaken to gather evidence, which we will then act upon to bring them to justice.

“The Action Counters Terrorism Campaign (ACT), recognises the important role the public have to play in preventing terrorism and whenever such individuals come to our attention a thorough investigation is undertaken to gather evidence and bring them to justice.

“While on this occasion, we were able to take action and prevent any danger to the public, any concerns held by members of the public should be reported to the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321.”

Ian Forman of Birkenhead sentenced to 10 years in prison after making homemade bomb and drawing up list of targets

Nazi sympathiser Ian Forman, who has been jailed for 10 years for preparing for acts of terrorism. Photograph: Greater Manchester Police/PA

Nazi sympathiser Ian Forman, who has been jailed for 10 years for preparing for acts of terrorism. Photograph: Greater Manchester Police/PA

A Nazi sympathiser who planned to blow up mosques in Merseyside has been jailed for 10 years.

Ian Forman, 42, from Birkenhead, was convicted of engaging in conduct in preparation of terrorist acts following an 11-day trial in March.

Forman, who had a “deep hatred” of Muslims, made a list of mosques near his home, which he referred to as his “dreck ziel” – a German phrase literally meaning “filth target”.

He researched how to make bombs online and tested explosives at his home before police discovered chemicals and a homemade explosive device in his bedroom in June last year, Kingston crown court heard.

Forman, who expressed rightwing views on social media and spoke of his admiration of Adolf Hitler and the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik, owned part of an SS officer’s uniform which he planned to display on a mannequin, the court heard.

Police found a film he had made of himself wearing an SS officer’s hat while playing video games.

Sentencing Forman to 10 years, the judge, Paul Dodgson, said the would-be terrorist had acted in a “racist, abusive and extremely offensive manner”.

He added: “You in your perverted way believed that your activities were a continuation of Nazi warfare.”

David Mason QC, in mitigation, said Forman was “not your average terrorist” and had struggled in Belmarsh prison alongside a large number of inmates from ethnic minorities.

“Everything this man did was geared towards his hate towards the ethnic community,” he said.

“It is consistent with someone who thought about it for a very long time but actually never stepped out of his front door to do it. He perhaps came across as someone rather pathetic, very bright, holding appalling views but not your average terrorist.”

Forman came to the attention of police in April 2013 while he worked as a receptionist at a glass recycling firm in Ellesmere Port.

Colleagues found that he had been researching chemicals and explosive substances on the internet during work hours – a breach of company policy.

He was called in for internal disciplinary meetings, during which he claimed his research was for his hobby of making fireworks.

Unconvinced, the company called Merseyside police, prompting his arrest.

After the sentencing on Thursday, DS Matt Findell of the north-west counter-terrorism unit said: “Thankfully, we will never know how far Forman was prepared to go in acting out his racist fantasies.

“However, we do know that Forman had carefully selected a number of targets to meet his own means. Had he carried them out, his attacks could have caused considerable damage to both property and people at several mosques.

“The north-west counter-terrorism unit has extensive experience of investigating individuals and groups who hope to threaten, intimidate and attack people for their own twisted political ends.

“We have demonstrated once again with today’s result that we will use every means at our disposal to protect our communities.”
The Guardian

From 2014



A CASTLEFORD man found to be a member of the now-banned neo-Nazi group National Action been jailed for four-years-and-three-months for posting racist and anti-Semitic messages.

Wayne Bell, age 37, of Mount Walk, Castleford, posted an image on a Russian social media site showing a man being hung by a rope with a Star of David on his forehead, the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said.

In another post he described Jewish people as “destructive” and “vile”.

Prosecutors said Bell was also behind hate-filled graffiti.

A CPS spokesman said that Bell posted in August 2016, “The only way,” below a photo of a police officer’s foot raised above the head of an unarmed black man, lying on the ground.

The spokesman said that in late 2016 he posted a number of messages on Twitter continuing his campaign of stirring up hatred against Jewish and black people.

Bell was a prominent member of National Action before its was banned 18 months ago and he featured in two posters used in a recruitment campaign.

The spokesman said 13 videos were found on Bell’s mobile phone and featured an unseen man – believed to be Bell – directing others who were daubing anti-Semitic graffiti, including swastikas and references to the Holocaust.

A rucksack found at his workplace in Leeds contained National Action stickers.

Bell pleaded guilty at Leeds Crown Court to two counts of stirring up racial hatred and three counts of possession of items with intent to destroy or damage property.

Last year he was sentenced to 30 months in prison after clashes between members of National Action and anti-fascist groups in Liverpool in February 2016.

Head of the Counter-Terrorism Division in the CPS, Sue Hemming, said: “Wayne Bell is a committed racist who posted messages on social media intending to stir up racial hatred against Jewish and black people.

“He was also behind graffiti that promoted his Neo-Nazi views and his deep rooted-hatred of all non-Aryan races.”

Detective Chief Superintendent Martin Snowden, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing North East, said: “Activity like this has the potential to both influence vulnerable people and threaten the stability of our communities by inciting hatred and threatening public safety and security.

“We will not tolerate any action which attempts to undermine or divide our communities and will continue to counter extremism and terrorism in all its forms.”

Chief Superintendent Mabs Hussain, district commander of Wakefield Police, said: “We welcome Bell’s sentence today for what are serious offences intended to cause to cause disharmony between communities, and I am very pleased with the investigation conducted by colleagues at Counter Terrorism Policing North East.

“The Wakefield district overwhelmingly enjoys good and positive relationships between its various communities and I am pleased that extremists such as Bell are in a very small minority indeed.”

Yorkshire Evening Post

A man from West Yorkshire who posted racist and anti-Semitic messages on social media and was behind hate-filled graffiti has been sentenced to four years and three months in prison today (23 May).

Wayne Bell, 37, posted an image on a Russian social media site in March 2016 showing a man being hung by a rope with a Star of David on his forehead. In another post he described Jewish people as “destructive” and “vile”.

Bell also had a hatred for black people and in August 2016 posted, “The only way,” below a photo of a police officer’s foot raised above the head of an unarmed black man, lying on the ground.

In late 2016 he posted a number of messages on Twitter continuing his campaign of stirring up hatred against Jewish and black people.

Leeds Crown Court heard how Bell was a prominent member of the neo-Nazi group National Action before its proscription and featured in two posters used in the group’s 2016 recruitment campaign. National Action was banned in December 2016.

He also pleaded guilty to three counts of possessing items with the intent to damage property in relation to racist graffiti in and around his home town of Castleford. Thirteen videos were found on Bell’s mobile phone and featured an unseen man – believed to be Bell – directing others as to where and what they should graffiti. The majority of the graffiti was anti-Semitic including swastikas and references to the Holocaust.

When his home was searched police found two spray cans, cable ties, travel planners, and stencils identical to those in the videos. A rucksack found at this workplace in Leeds contained National Action stickers.

Sue Hemming from the CPS said: “Wayne Bell is a committed racist who posted messages on social media intending to stir up racial hatred against Jewish and black people.

“He was also behind graffiti that promoted his Neo-Nazi views and his deep rooted hatred of all non-Aryan races.

“Those who choose to behave in this way can expect to face the legal consequences of their actions, which can include going to prison.”
Notes to editors

Wayne Bell (dob 10/08/1980) pleaded guilty to:
Two counts of stirring up racial hatred contrary to section 19(1) Public Order Act 1986
Three counts of possession of items with intent to destroy or damage property, contrary to section 3 Criminal Damage Act 1971

Bell was sentenced to 30 months in prison on 24 November 2017 after being found guilty of an offence of conspiracy to commit violent disorder at Liverpool Crown Court. The offence related to disorder in Liverpool on 27 February 2016 which occurred when members of National Action, including Wayne Bell, and other right wing groups clashed with opposing factions.
Sue Hemming is the Head of the Counter-Terrorism Division in the CPS.

CPS

An illegal photograph snapped during a court hearing has landed a Wigan man a hefty fine.

Defendant Daniel Lewis fell foul of the Criminal Justice Act, which makes taking a photograph a contempt of court offence, earlier this year.

The 28-year-old, of Battersby Street, Ince, took out his mobile phone during a break in proceedings but was spotted by court officials taking a picture of the courtroom.

Lewis was in Wigan and Leigh Magistrates’ Court on January 15 after pleading guilty to a public order offence relating to disorderly or threatening words of behaviour.

For taking the illegal picture, he later appeared at Liverpool Magistrates’ Court on February 1, and pleaded guilty to the offence.

He received a £200 fine and was ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £20 and court costs of £85.

For the public order conviction he was handed a £150 fine and ordered to pay £80 in compensation, a victim surcharge of £20 and £85 court costs.

The court also imposed a restraining order meaning that Lewis must not contact ******* ******** or ****** ********* and not enter ******* *********, Ashton-in-Makerfield.

The order lasts until July 15 this year.

The Criminal Justice Act 1925 prohibits any photographs, portraits or sketches of a justice or witness in, or party to, proceedings in the courtroom or its precincts.

Wigan Today

From 2016