Campaign Against Antisemitism heralds ‘the first conviction in the UK over Holocaust denial’ after antisemite loses case

An antisemitic blogger who posted grossly offensive songs online calling Auschwitz a “theme park” and denying the Holocaust, Alison Chabloz, has lost the appeal against her conviction.

Alison Chabloz, 55, claimed Anne Frank’s diary was faked and said lyrics such as Auschwitz holy temple is a theme park just for fools,” were created out of love for the Jewish people.

Chabloz said she wanted to free Jews “from this atrocity propaganda.”

She was convicted of three counts of sending by a public communications network an offensive, indecent or menacing message or material after a trial at Westminster Magistrates’ Court last May.

Today judge Christopher Hehir upheld the convictions and said: “She is a Holocaust denier.”

“She is manifestly antisemitic and utterly obsessed with what she perceives to be the wrongdoing of the Jews and their disproportionate influence in politics, the media and banking in particular.

“She appears to us quite simply to have lost all sense of perspective.’

Referring to one of the songs, entitled ‘I Like The Story As It Is – Satire’, the judge said: “It blames Jews for their suffering and brands them as thieves, liars and usurpers.

“That is woven into sickening Holocaust related references to shrunken heads, soap, lampshades and smoke coming from crematorium chimneys.”

Gideon Falter, Chairman of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This is the first conviction in the UK over Holocaust denial on social media”

He said Chabloz’s “actions defending the Nazis and claiming that the Holocaust was a fraud seek to defile” the sacrifice of those who fought in the Second World War.

“This sentence sends a strong message that in Britain, Holocaust denial and antisemitic conspiracy theories will not be tolerated.”

“Alison Chabloz is a remorseless and repulsive antisemite who has spent years obsessively inciting others to hate Jews, principally by claiming that the Holocaust was a hoax perpetrated by Jews to defraud the world.

“Other antisemites who believe that they can abuse the Jewish community online with impunity should take note.”

The judge sitting with magistrates at Southwark Crown Court added: “We unhesitatingly reject the appellant’s evidence that this song was at least in part motivated by a benevolent desire to free Jewish people from the shackles of “atrocity propaganda” about the Holocaust.

“We are sure that she wrote and performed it because she hates Jews.

“What is particularly repellent is that the song is sung in a spiteful parody of a Yiddish or similar accent, and is set to the tune of a celebrated Hebrew song, Hava Nagila.”

Referring to another song, (((Survivors))), judge Hehir said: “We consider that it is by no means excessive to describe this song as disgusting.

“It makes tasteless references to a number of identifiable Holocaust victims or survivors.

“It’s currency includes jovial reference to Dr Josef Mengele, the Auschwitz physician notorious for his sadistic experiments on Jewish and other children, to the bodies of babies being burnt and to the death, in a concentration camp, of one particular child Anne Frank.

“Shortly after seeking to extract humor from her death, the suggestion that her celebrated diary was not actually her work, and the supposed financial wrongdoings of her father and the charity established in her name, the song moves on to a denunciation of bankers and warmongers.

“A central theme of this song is that the Jews exploit the Holocaust for financial gain.

“We therefore affirm the appellant’s convictions on all three charges,” concluded the judge.

Earlier James Mulholland, QC, for the Crown, said proper academic discussion of history was protected under European Convention of Human Rights but Chabloz’s songs could not be considered reasoned criticism.

“Being a poor historian, a one-sided or one-eyed historian is not an offence,” explained the barrister.

Judge Hehir agreed, saying: “Of course Holocaust denial is not a crime in this jurisdiction.”

Mr Mulholland replied: “It is the manner in which that is done or whether or not it is proper analysis.”

He said speech likely to threaten justice, peace and non-discrimination was not covered by Article 10 (of the ECHR).

“This jurisdiction recognised formally that war crimes were committed by the Nazis in World War Two.

“If something is grossly offensive, simply describing it as satire cannot obscure that or obviate it. The assertion that Auschwitz is a “holy temple” is a deliberate attack.”

Adrian Davies, for Chabloz, said the original prosecution had been as strange one given that Chabloz was charged with embedding a link on her blog to recordings of her songs that had been uploaded by someone else.

“The whole thrust of the charge against her is that by merely pointing out that this song had already been published to YouTube, she is mens rea.”

Mr Davies argued that those who chose to view the videos would be at “either end of the spectrum,”

“Someone looking for material with a view to prosecution can be taken to know what kind of material they are going to find. Those gathering the evidence represent the other end of the spectrum of opinion.

“The prospect of some random person accessing it would be minimal given the amount of content on YouTube.”

Mr Davies added: “She obviously feels very passionately about the subject.

“It would be a very, very strong thing to say that a criminal penalty should be imposed on someone for singing in polemical terms about matters for which she feels so strongly, especially given the very limited nature of the subject of the charges against her.

“However offensive Mrs Chabloz’s lyrics might have been to some, they do not cross the line into grossly offensive and she ought, on that account, be acquitted.

“There is a very high hurdle to be jumped to show that she has gone beyond what she is entitled do.”

Chabloz told the court: “My songs are not a product of hate, they are a product of love, trying to free them from this atrocity propaganda.”

Mr Mulholland asked: “Do you believe that Jews, as a group, are more likely to lie?”

Chabloz replied: “In their holy scripture, the Talmud, it is even encouraged. In the Talmud there are verses that say Jews who lie are following their religious duties.

“These are song lyrics, these are not a PhD thesis – they are silly songs.”

Mr Mulholland replied: “They are silly songs? They are songs designed to abuse.”

Chabloz replied: “These are songs that nobody was obliged to listen to.”

She insisted that she was not a member of the far-right, claiming that she was pro-Palestinian and a “Holocaust revisionist.”

In one of the songs, the ex-music teacher sings about the ‘Holohoax’ before asking: “Did the Holocaust even happen, was it just a bunch of lies?”

Mr Mulholland questioned her on the subject of ethnicity, asking: “Is it fair to say that you take the view that this country, being British, belongs to the whites?”

“Um, I take the view that Europe is a civilization and white Europeans have the right to fight to defend their civilization and their culture.”

“Do you consider Jewish people to be white?” asked the QC.

“Some of them certainly look white,” replied Chabloz, “I don’t consider Jews to be a race.”

Chabloz, of Charlesworth, Glossop, Derbyshire, denied but was convicted of three counts of sending by a public communications network an offensive, indecent or menacing message or material.

She was sentenced to 20 weeks imprisonment suspended for two years and banned from posting on social media for a year.

Judge Hehir upheld the convictions on all three counts.

Jewish Times

Shane Wallace admits affray following the incident in Queensway just before new year

The man who ended up in a medically induced coma and suffered horrific injuries in a street fight has admitted charges of affray and possessing a knife.

Shane Wallace was refused bail and the chance to return home to his family before he is sentenced today.

Wallace, 34, of Greyfriars, Grimsby, was originally accused of attempting to wound a man with intent to cause grievous bodily harm and possessing a knife on December 30, during an incident in Queensway.

But the more serious of the two charges he faced at Grimsby Magistrates’ Court has been dropped and it was not put to him when he appeared at the higher court via a video link from Doncaster Prison.

It was replaced with the lesser affray charge alongside the knife offence.

Prosecutor Jeremy Evans said of Wallace: “This man suffered horrific injuries.”

Judge Paul Watson QC said that Wallace suffered multiple fractures to his face and was in an induced coma in hospital.

He added that many would say that the worst aspect of his involvement was possessing the knife.

Defence barrister Andrew Bailey asked for Wallace to be allowed bail pending sentence.

Shane Wallace was treated at Hull Royal Infirmary following a serious assault on Queensway, Grimsby

Shane Wallace was treated at Hull Royal Infirmary following a serious assault on Queensway, Grimsby

“He would now like to go back to his family,” said Mr Bailey.

“He has entered honest pleas.”

But Judge Watson said that it would be worse for Wallace to be allowed bail and then have to go back to prison when he was sentenced.

Wallace will be sentenced without a pre-sentence report at Grimsby Crown Court today and was remanded back into custody following yesterday’s hearing.

Another man charged in connection with the incident will appear in court in May

Grimsby Telegraph

A KEYLESS reveller is starting 12 months in jail after he tried to get back into his home using a ladder at 2.40am.

An eye-witness thought Andrew John Waterson was a burglar and summoned police to Skelton Court, Clifton, said prosecutor David Garnet,t at York Crown Court.

The 39-year-old, with 105 previous convictions, reacted so badly to the police presence, it took five officers to bring the kicking, screaming man under control.

“You have pleaded guilty yet again to a series of offences that reflect your complete disregard for any ideas in our society for good behaviour,” Judge Jonathan Durham Hall QC told Waterson.

“There is nothing that can be sensibly done by the defence to stop this court from doing its duty. Some court has to.”

He jailed him for three months, plus nine months previously suspended for benefit fraud.

Waterson pleaded guilty to a public order offence and causing criminal damage to a police cell.

For Waterson, Iftikhar Ahmed said his client did not have his house key with him, but had an arrangement to wake up a neighbour who did have a key when he returned from his night out.

“This is something he has adopted in the past,” said Mr Ahmed. “Unfortunately for him, police were called.

“He tried to explain to the police exactly what he was doing, but he felt that the police officers didn’t want to hear anything from him.”

The court was told Waterson regretted his actions.

He had been out with friends for the first time since his 15-year-old daughter had come to live with him and had got drunk. His parental responsibilities had led to him changing his lifestyle and he had got part-time work.

“I have rarely seen a record so bad,” Judge Durham-Hall said.

“I have rarely seen someone treated with such leniency over the years.”

Waterson’s 105 previous convictions included eight for public order offences and ten for damaging property.

He got the suspended sentence at York Crown Court in November for claiming £11,790 in benefit while doing six jobs at different times over a three-year period.

Benefit fraudster

Andrew Waterson claimed a disability living allowance, income support, housing benefit and council tax benefit on the grounds that he had an injured arm that stopped him working.

But the car valet still managed to do six jobs at different times between May 2002 and 2005, thus netting £11,790 of taxpayers’ money he was not entitled to, York Crown Court heard in November.

Defence barrister David Dixon said Waterson had needed the money to support his family and towards the end of the period had been helping his partner fund her drug habit.

The Recorder of York, Judge Stephen Ashurst decided the five benefit offences Waterson admitted, plus 273 similar offences taken into consideration, merited a nine-month prison sentence.

He suspended the sentence because jailing him could mean Waterson’s teenage daughter would have to go into care and because the Department of Work and Pensions had waited 18 months before prosecuting him.

However, once Waterson admitted another offence committed during the two-year suspension period, another judge could jail him – and did.

York Press

From 2008

Shane Fletcher wrote that the massacre would be the "most exciting day" of his life

Shane Fletcher wrote that the massacre would be the “most exciting day” of his life

A man has been convicted of plotting a mass murder in his home town.

Shane Fletcher planned to attack the annual Uppies and Downies football event in Workington, Cumbria, when thousands of people would be lining the streets.

Manchester Crown Court heard the 21-year-old had bomb-making manuals and tried to solicit a friend to take part.

He will be sentenced on 14 March once a psychiatric report has been prepared.

The court was told he wanted to emulate Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, who murdered 12 students and one teacher at their school in Columbine, Colorado, in 1999 before killing themselves.

Fletcher had spoken of his hatred of Workington and of getting a van and “ploughing down” people in revenge for years of being bullied.

He was arrested at his Wastwater Avenue home on 10 March, days after his probation officer contacted police.

The officer warned them Fletcher had said the only things preventing him from carrying out mass murder were a lack of cash and access to weapons.

Officers found a diary under his sofa which contained written instructions on how to make a bomb and improvised napalm, along with his mobile phone which contained an image of the Columbine killers lying dead on the ground.

Numerous diary entries highlighted his anger, with one which read: “On the 4th April Workington will be oblitrated (sic), everything and everyone will be destroyed.

“I will show no mercy killing you so called humans I will be doing it with a smirk on my face.”

Facebook messages were recovered which showed Fletcher attempting to persuade his “only friend”, Kyle Dixon, to take part in the attack.

Fletcher did not give evidence in his defence but his barrister, Simon Csoka QC, said he was a lonely attention-seeker who was fully aware his comments to his probation officer would be passed to police.

He argued the Facebook chats with Mr Dixon were “stupid and idiotic” conversations between two young men which were “a world away from these fanciful theories about the Columbine massacre”.

He had been seeing the Probation Service since April 2017 following his release on licence from a jail sentence.

The jury found him guilty of one count of soliciting to murder and two counts of collecting or making a record of information useful for terrorism purposes.

BBC News

Mark Meechan's clip was viewed more than three million times on YouTube

Mark Meechan’s clip was viewed more than three million times on YouTube



A man who was fined for posting an online video of a dog carrying out Nazi salutes has failed in a bid to challenge his conviction.

Mark Meechan recorded his girlfriend’s pug, Buddha, responding to statements such as “Sieg Heil” by raising its paw.

He was fined £800 at Airdrie Sheriff Court and had hoped to challenge the case at the highest court in the land.

But this has now been blocked by Scotland’s most senior judges.

Meechan, from Coatbridge, North Lanarkshire, has raised more than £75,000 through an online appeal to help pay for the challenge.

The 31-year-old denied committing an offence under the Communications Act during a trial at Airdrie Sheriff Court last year but was found guilty of breaching it by posting the grossly offensive film.

He claimed that the video was only intended as a joke to upset his girlfriend.

Sheriff Derek O’Carroll fined him £800 and a subsequent attempt by Meechan to challenge his conviction at the Sheriff Appeal Court, where the judges are senior sheriffs, failed after it was rejected in the initial sifting process.

Meechan’s lawyers then raised a petition seeking to have the High Court use its powers to allow an appeal to be taken to the UK Supreme Court in London.

But Scotland’s senior judge, the Lord Justice General, Lord Carloway, sitting with the Lord Justice Clerk, Lady Dorrian, and Lord Menzies rejected the move, saying they had no powers to allow any further appeal in the circumstances of the case.

‘Consequences have been immense’

Meechan had sought to pursue a human rights appeal including a claim under article 10 which covers freedom of expression.

His senior counsel, Dorothy Bain QC argued that the petition was competent and necessary to advance the challenge brought by Meechan.

She said: “The consequences of his conviction for this breach of the Communications Act have been immense for him both professionally and personally.”

Advocate depute Alex Prentice QC, for the Crown, counter argued that the Sheriff Appeal Court had exercised its powers in accordance with statute and called on the judges to refuse Meechan permission to appeal.

Meechan, who posts videos under the name Count Dankula, has a target of raising £100,000 to cover the cost of his appeal.

BBC News

Laura Heywood begged magistrates not to send her to custody but they were appalled by her ‘horrendous’ record

A woman who hurled racist abuse at takeaway staff and a police officer has been jailed despite begging magistrates to give her another chance.

Laura Heywood blamed her “abusive and controlling” boyfriend for the heavy drug abuse which led to her offending.

Appearing live via a video link from HMP New Hall, the 24-year-old pleaded with Kirklees magistrates not to hand her a custodial sentence after pleading guilty to a string of charges.

She told them: “I’m begging you to take this risk on me – please don’t send me to prison.”

But magistrates were unmoved to grant her request after hearing details of offences including her vile abuse of two takeaway workers – one a teenage boy- where she threw cans of drink at them.

The incident at Dixxi Express in Batley happened on May 4 last year.

Drunk Heywood was at the nearby bus station with a friend and they walked into the St James Street takeaway.

Prosecutor Alex Bozman said: “They were racially abusive to two staff members, describing them as ‘P**i b******s’.

“Cans were then thrown at both gentlemen, hitting them and the contents spilling all over their clothing.

“One of the staff members was 16 and shocked to be assaulted at his place of work as he’d never experienced anything like that before.

“The other victim said that he was angry and that it was an unprovoked attack and there was no reason why they’d been targeted.”

Police were called and caught Heywood and her friend trying to board a bus. Heywood was described as aggressive and refusing to leave the vehicle.

When she was finally put into the police van she directed racist abuse to a female officer during the journey, calling her a ‘black b****d’ and’ n****r’ and telling her: “You’d be used as a footstool.”

Mr Bozman said: “The officer found her attitude and insults rather vile and stated that nobody has the right or authority to aim abuse at her.”

Magistrates were told about another incident at Laurel Drive in Birstall on June 3.

The victim had parked her Ford Fiesta there to visit a friend when Heywood came out into the street carrying a bottle of fizzy drink.

She shouted: “Whose is this car?” and she replied that it belonged to her. Heywood responded: “I don’t give a f**k anyway, I’m going to put it through.” She then threw the bottle at the vehicle, causing a dent.

Heywood went on to damage a police vehicle on November 6 when they were responding to reports of a domestic incident at an address in Common Road in Batley.

As her boyfriend was arrested from the property she picked up an item and threw it at a marked police car, causing a dent in the vehicle.

Then on December 30 Heywood was caught stealing a bottle of wine from the Hanging Heaton Food Store.

She pleaded guilty to two charges of racially-aggravated assault, racially-aggravated harassment, two counts of criminal damage, theft from a shop, being drunk and disorderly in public, three charges of failing to surrender to court and committing a further offence while subject to a conditional discharge.

Her solicitor Paul Blanchard described her as having a Jekyll and Hyde personality, adding that alcohol she consumed at the time of the offences would have clouded her judgement.

He explained: “The background to her most recent offending is combined with a relationship she has formed and during the relationship she has become involved in the consumption of Class A drugs.

“She’s made some ridiculously bad decisions and doesn’t deal with situations well.

“She hasn’t dealt with her child being adopted and resorted to the consumption of alcohol to block out the reality of situations.

“She’s a lovely, lovely person but has got her demons which unfortunately at times come to the top.

“Something has to change but the only person who can change is Laura Heywood.”

Heywood read a letter to the court in which she pleaded with magistrates not to jail her.

She said: “I know I need to grow up and sort my life out. I just need some support.

“I’ve now got out of my controlling and violent relationship and I’m begging you to take this risk on me.

“I know I’ve got a long, hard journey but I know I can do it. Please let me prove you wrong and make my family proud.”

But bench chairwoman Kathryn Beney slammed her ‘horrendous record’ and said she and her colleagues felt that custody was their only option.

They jailed Heywood, of Laurel Drive in Batley, for a total of 24 weeks.

Upon her release she will have to pay £100 to both of the takeaway employees she assaulted and abused.

Huddersfield Examiner

Racist assault: Mark Brown

Convicted: Mark Brown.

The former leader of the National Front in Northern Ireland has been convicted of a “vile” racist attack on a taxi driver in Co Antrim.

Mark Brown (31), of Skerryview in Craigahullier near Portrush, was also found guilty of not paying an £18.40 taxi fare.

Brown had contested the charges but was convicted at Coleraine Magistrates Court yesterday.

Deputy District Judge Peter Magill said it was a “racially-motivated” offence and the defendant had “clearly expressed vile racist comments” regarding taxi driver Ricardo Alavijeh (56).

Mr Alavijeh, who is understood to be originally from the Middle East, told the court Brown punched him on the head in his car, but because he was wearing a cap he wasn’t seriously injured. He said he drove up the road to phone the police and noticed Brown “running after me”.

“I was very worried, I was panicking,” he said.

He told the court Brown was also “being racist towards me”.

The taxi driver said he had initially received a call under a different name and wasn’t at first aware it was Brown.

Brown’s barrister claimed the driver “decided to make trouble” for Brown by falsely accusing him of assault and not paying the fare. The lawyer said Brown had tried to pay the taxi fare.

Mr Alavijeh told the court: “As a taxi driver dealing with drunk people and people under the influence of drugs there are a lot of incidents of racial abuse in Coleraine. I don’t even bother phoning the police unless it is serious.”

Statements from police officers said that when arrested, Brown made several remarks including references to “Muslim c***”, “jihadi bombing b******s” and “dirty Paki b******”.

Brown claimed the driver had a “grudge” against him and the allegation that he punched Mr Alavijeh was “a tissue of lies”.

He told the court that he had ordered a taxi to take him from his partner’s home, where he drank two bottles of wine, to his parents’ home. When he realised the driver was Mr Alavijeh he wasn’t going to use the taxi, but was told to get in.

Brown claimed he had got out of the car intending to pay with a £20 note, but the taxi driver then drove off.

Brown admitted he had made remarks to police and said it was because he was “agitated and frustrated” at being arrested.

He told the court he had no exact memory of what he had said to police and added: “I apologise for the nature of the words.”

The court heard Brown had been convicted in 2009 of similar offences against Mr Alavijeh.

Convicting the defendant of the 2018 offences, Judge Magill said that having seen and heard from both men in court he was satisfied beyond a reasonable doubt of Brown’s guilt.

The judge said he did not believe Mr Alavijeh would make up a false account for no reason which he would then have to tell to police and a court.

Judge Magill said Brown had “clearly expressed vile racist comments”. He said it was a “racially motivated offence”. He said he needed a pre-sentence report on Brown and adjourned sentencing until February.

Belfast Telegraph