Andrew Howard now finds himself in jail

A man found with hoards of Nazi paraphernalia has been jailed for eight weeks after writing racist abuse at a prospective neighbour who wanted to move in across the road.

52-year-old Andrew Howard had watched the family from his doorstep as they viewed the empty house. The next day, he spray painted ‘We don’t want Muslims here’ across the front of the property, alongside signs stating: “No Muslims here, f*** off”, and “you’re not wanted here, you Musrat scum, f*** off back to your own country,” Manchester Magistrates Court heard.

The family were going to move into the house but, after Howard’s racist graffiti, decided against it.

A police search of Howard’s house revealed a vast array of racist items such as Nazi flags – that were hung inside – a hanging picture of Adolf Hitler, swastikas and copies of ‘Mein Kampf’

Officer’s also discovered a room containing ‘sophisticated radio equipment’ and numbers – the door to the room had a sign reading: “Do good for the community – shoot a P***”.

In a victim personal statement, the father of the family who viewed the house said: “We no longer want to move into the address.

“I don’t feel safe there with my family. I don’t feel like my children can play in the street, as I feel someone will harm them.

“I don’t feel like my wife can go outside as someone will harm her.

“This is the first time something like this has happened to me – why does someone have to hurt someone because of religion?

“I’m also worried because my wife wears Muslim dress and it’s made me fear for her safety in that area.”

Howard, of Newton Heath, pleaded guilty to one offence of racially aggravated harassment.

Outlining the facts of the case, prosecutor David Morgan said on April 18 last year, the victim and his family went to view the house, and being happy with it, they wished to take the tenancy.

“That day they noticed a male watching them on his doorstep across the road as they looked around the area,” Mr Morgan said.

“The next day they went to the house to find ‘we don’t want Muslims here’ spray painted on the front door.

“On the water pipe it said ‘No Muslims here, f**k off’.

“Then along the front of the property it said: ‘you’re not wanted here, you Musrat scum, f**k off back to your own country.’

“The family immediately left the house and pulled out of the tenancy.

“As a result of this graffiti, police undertook a house search of the defendant and they found a substantial amount of racist paraphernalia.

“This included three Nazi flags which were hung from the property, swastikas and books.

“There was also a room containing a large amount of sophisticated radio equipment and phone numbers, and on the front of the door a sign read: “Do good for the community, shoot a P***’.

“There was also a painting of Adolf Hilter which was on the wall and copies of ‘Mein Kampf’.

Howard was said to have no previous convictions.

In an earlier hearing, it was suggested that he had served time in the army and as a result suffered from PTSD.

However, following the preparation of a pre-sentence report and various investigations, this was proved not to be the case.

In mitigation, Howard’s defence lawyer Daniel Weed said: “In the pre-sentence report there is reference to the defendant serving in the army – that is not correct.
Manchester Evening News

Detectives investigating motive of suspected shooter who died in crash while trying to flee

Detectives are continuing to investigate the shooting of a children’s author and parish councillor whose suspected attacker died in a police chase after trying to flee on a motorcycle.

The victim, James Nash, 42, is critically ill in hospital after receiving serious head injuries during the daytime attack in the Hampshire village of Upper Enham. His wife, Sarah, a specialist in satellite technology, received minor injuries in the incident, which happened on Wednesday afternoon.

Police are still investigating the motive of the suspected attacker, Alex Sartain, 34, who lived near Nash. Sartain was a mechanic and was jailed in 2016 for theft while on a suspended sentence for assault and for driving while under the influence of drugs. On social media he followed pages dedicated to figures connected to German Nazis and once wrote “I come with a warning label”.

Police have not said what weapon was used in the attack but some local people have claimed it was a homemade shotgun.

Phil North, the leader of Test Valley borough council, sought to reassure residents, telling them officers were confident that the deceased rider was the perpetrator of the shooting.

Describing Nash as a “hands-on” councillor, North said: “I know James well and have worked with him on a number of projects … I’m still utterly shocked at this terrible incident.

“James is such a kind-hearted individual who cares deeply for his community. He is also a talented children’s author and illustrator and I was extremely touched last year when one of the dedications in his latest book was to my newborn daughter.”

He added: “My thoughts remain with James, his family and the people of Enham Alamein. I hope and pray that he makes a recovery. We’re all with you, James.”

Hampshire police said investigations were at an early stage but they did not believe there were any outstanding suspects.

Sartain is believed to have initially fled the scene on foot before trying to get away on a motorbike. He was involved in a fatal crash on an A-road about 3 miles from Nash’s home.

Nash, who is also an artist, has written children’s books including the self-illustrated The Winter Wild.

Kit Malthouse, the MP for north-west Hampshire, who is also the minister for crime and policing, said he had been briefed by a senior officer and that his thoughts were with the family.

The Guardian.

The chemical engineer claimed he was making fireworks at HMP Wakefield

A white supremacist who stabbed an elderly man to death and planted home-made bombs at mosques has admitted making an explosive substance in his cell at a maximum-security jail.

Self-radicalised extremist Pavlo Lapshyn, 32, a chemical engineer, used salt, copper wire, pencil and other substances to form an ingredient which could be used to cause an explosion.

When officers at the category A prison HMP Wakefield found a plate with a white substance on it in his cell in August 2018, he told them he was trying to make a firework.

HMP Wakefield is known as Monster Mansion due to the number of high-profile, high-risk sex offenders and murderers there.

Lapshyn, a Ukrainian national, had just started a work placement in the UK when he murdered 82-year-old Mohammed Saleem in Small Heath, Birmingham, by randomly stabbing the grandfather in the back with a hunting knife in 2013.

In the following months he planted bombs near mosques in the West Midlands, later stating his aim was to start a race war.

Since he was jailed for life with a minimum term of 40 years he has been assessed by psychiatrists and has an autism diagnosis along with “significant mental health problems”, Leeds Crown Court heard.

He pleaded guilty to making an explosive substance via a videolink from HMP Whitemoor, was heard singing at points during the hearing and declined to be present when Judge Tom Bayliss QC passed a two-year jail sentence.

Peter Hampton, prosecuting, said Lapshyn admitted to officers that he had been preparing chemicals during their routine search of his cell and they informed counter-terrorism specialists in the prison.

They knew of his background as a chemical engineering PhD student, his racially-motivated murder and explosives campaign, and “a long-standing interest in pyrotechnics”, Mr Hampton said.

The defendant told officers he was trying to produce potassium chloride. A smell of bleach could be detected in the cell.

A forensic expert who was called in determined Lapshyn had formed a viable explosive substance.

Attempts were made to interview the defendant about this, the court heard, but he was unable or unwilling to assist.

After moving to HMP Whitemoor, he wrote a chemical formula on his cell wall which he said was related to pyrotechnics.

Searches of his cell there found he was hiding substances including vinegar, artificial sweetener and salt.

Mr Hampton said of his offending at HMP Wakefield: “The defendant’s actions clearly caused the risk of explosion or fire within a category A prison, potentially to harm officers, other prisoners or Mr Lapshyn himself, and interferes with the general running of the prison.”

Judge Bayliss said it was right for the CPS to bring the prosecution but he would not pass a consecutive sentence as Lapshyn – whom he described as a “highly intelligent man” – was already serving a minimum term of 40 years.

He said: “He wouldn’t even be considered for release by the Parole Board until he is 65 and he is very unlikely ever to be released given his position.”

Manchester Evening Post

A JUDGE has said hooligans intent on fighting at the Portsmouth v Southampton match are not true fans.

Judge William Ashworth made the comments at Portsmouth Crown Court where he jailed 53-year-old former Ukip candidate Derek Jennings for violent disorder.

Dad-of-two Jennings punched police horse Luna twice, in the nose and mouth, ahead of kick off at the Carabao Cup third round derby match on September 24.

The trusted family man, of Laburnum Grove, Copnor, has now been jailed for 20 months with a six-year football banning order. He admitted violent disorder.

During sentencing, judge Ashworth said: ‘There’s absolutely no doubt that some of the, I won’t call them Portsmouth fans, people from the Portsmouth side of the supporting section – I won’t call them fans because they weren’t there for the football – they were there to fight.

‘They were clearly goading and threatening the Southampton contingent, singing a particular song which was clearly a group indication of a desire to engage in violence.

‘Both groups, Portsmouth and Southampton groups, were exchanging threats and goading each other, and if the police had not been there then this turbulence of threats and aggression from both groups would simply have boiled over into a vast running battle in the residential streets of Portsmouth and the damage and the results of that violence would have been wide ranging.’

More people are being prosecuted in relation to the disorder.

Sgt Leon Astley, from the shared Hampshire and Thames Valley police horse unit, said: ‘Luna was simply there to do her job and assist police in protecting the public

‘This type of behaviour is completely unacceptable.

‘Fortunately she was not injured during this incident but we’ve made sure she’s had plenty of TLC since then.’

Det Chief Insp John McGonigle added: ‘For a grown man to act in this way was deplorable, especially against an animal, who was simply there to help protect people who wanted to enjoy the game and get home safely.

‘We hope this sentence sends a clear message that we will not tolerate this type of behaviour or any disorder at any public event.

‘Action will be taken and those responsible will be investigated.’

Both he and Sgt Astley thanked the public for an ‘outpouring’ of support for Luna.

Portsmouth News

A Sunderland thug has been jailed for his part in violence which broke out in Westminster and made headlines across the country.

But it’s not the first time Daniel Allan has found himself in trouble; the thug has over 110 convictions.

The 35-year-old, who lives in Ridley Terrace in Hendon, has now been sentenced to 28 months in prison Southwark Crown Court, after pleading guilty to violent disorder at Westminster Magistrates’ Court.

He had travelled to the capital on June 13 to join in a demonstration held in Parliament Square.

Clashes broke out between protestors – who said they were protecting monuments from damage they feared would be caused by anti-racism campaigners – and police officers.

Allan was seen at 3.15pm that day, kicking a police sergeant in the back, knocking him to the ground in Bridge Street, just next to the Houses of Parliament.

The Metropolitan Police said footage of the attack was shared widely on social media, and a short time later, “officers recognised Allan due to his distinctive coloured clothing” which turned out to be a pair of luminous shorts.

He was arrested by City of London Police and later charged.

The Met Police has said the officer he struck was left with bruising to his back and was able to recover at home.

Home Secretary Priti Patel said 38 officers had been hurt during the disorder.

Back in February 2017, Newcastle Crown Court heard Allan had threatened to burn down a former partner’s home, threatening to take children hostage after smashing his way into her home and grabbing her phone.

Their ordeal happened after he had made 50 unanswered calls to the woman before he turned up drunk at her door early one January morning.

Police turned up and soon arrested Allan, who had been trying to hide in a nearby lane.

As he was sentenced 12 months after admitting burglary, the court was told at that stage he had 110 previous offences on his record.

His barrister said Allan believed his drink had been spiked and had been left distraught at the end of the relationship with the woman and had not gone to the house to steal anything.

Sunderland Echo

James Healy given prison term for ‘frenzied and unprovoked attack’ outside London pub

A Chelsea football fan was jailed for two years and eight months for committing an aggravated assault on the Guardian columnist Owen Jones with a “karate kick to his lower back”, motivated by hostility to the writer’s leftwing and LGBT politics.

James Healy, 40, from Portsmouth, was sentenced at Snaresbrook crown court for “a frenzied and wholly unprovoked attack” last August that took place in the street late at night after Jones had been out celebrating his birthday.

Recorder Anne Studd, the presiding judge, said there were “very significant aggravating factors” as she handed down the sentence to Healy at the high end of the range available.

The judge described Healy as “a man holding extreme rightwing opinions who attacked a victim who did no more than hold opinions on which the defendant did not agree”.

Two other men, Liam Tracey, 35, from Camden, London, and Charlie Ambrose, 31, from Brighton, were also sentenced for their part in the assault.

Tracey and Ambrose received an eight-month sentence, suspended for two years. Both had pleaded guilty last December although the conclusion of the case was delayed for several months due to the coronavirus crisis.

The court heard how Jones was attacked from behind by Healy at 2am outside the Lexington pub in King’s Cross, north London, having recognised the journalist and commentator in the pub earlier in the evening.

Jones was knocked to the ground and injured after being struck, and was “spared further blows only by the actions of the friends who were with him”, Studd said as she read out her judgment. A general fight then broke out involving Healy and the other two defendants.

In a victim impact statement, Jones said that while the injuries he sustained healed rapidly, there had been a longer lasting psychological impact. Despite previously being on the receiving end of online abuse, it was the first time he had been subject to a physical attack.

Philip McGhee, prosecuting, said Jones believed it was “harder to ignore online threats now” and that “he no longer feels he can walk alone, and will take taxis even for short distances as on account of this attack he feels at risk”.

The three men were not detained in the immediate aftermath of the fight in the street, but the court heard that they were arrested after they were recognised from CCTV footage by officers familiar with Chelsea supporters known to police.

Healy had at least nine convictions relating to football hooliganism stretching back to 1998. A search of his property after his arrest revealed a collection of far-right hooligan memorabilia, loosely connected with the Chelsea Youth Firm.

McGhee, prosecuting, said Healy possessed “a greeting card, which bore Nazi far-right extremist terror symbols, including those associated with the far-right Combat 18 group, one of whose tenets is ‘kill all queers’”.

Also discovered was a Nazi SS flag bearing a “totenkopf” death’s head skull symbol plus “a number of pins of badges”, including a circular pin badge with the “lead the way” and “whatever it takes” motto of Combat 18 and a badge that said “Chelsea FC no asylum seekers”.

Healy had pleaded guilty to the charges of actual body harm and affray but a special fact-finding hearing in January ruled that the “wholly unprovoked assault” was aggravated because Jones had been targeted because of his pro-LGBT and leftwing political views. Healy was also sentenced for 10 months for affray, served concurrently.

The judge concluded Jones had been identified in the pub by Healy or one of his friends earlier in the evening and that they had identified him as a target for attack.

CCTV footage showed Healy appearing to motion to friends outside the pub that Jones was leaving – and that he then followed him to launch “a running kick” on Jones in the small hours.

After the sentencing, Jones said: “Prison isn’t a solution to far right extremism: it’s a political problem which can’t be magicked away by custodial sentences. But if any good comes of this case, it’s to focus attention on a far-right threat which poses a violent threat to minorities and the left, including to those who have suffered far more than me”.

A Guardian spokesperson said: “We are pleased that the police and courts have now dealt with those responsible for this terrible attack. Assaults on journalists or political activists have no place in a decent society.”

The Guardian

Jacek Tchorzewski had links to Sonnenkrieg Division terrorist group



A neo-Nazi has been jailed for possessing indecent images of children and extreme pornography.

Jacek Tchorzewski, who had links to the Sonnenkrieg Division terrorist group, was imprisoned for terror offences last year.

But the 19-year-old has now been sentenced at Harrow Crown Court for downloading videos, photos and animations depicting child rape, incest and “sexual interference with a corpse”.

The court heard the material was discovered after police stopped Tchorzewski at Luton Airport on 20 February last year.

He had been about to board a flight back to Poland after visiting his mother, who lives in High Wycombe.

Prosecutor Margia Mostafa said officers who seized his phone and two laptops discovered “evidence of child pornography” as well as far-right terrorist material.

“The contents of the images are fairly distressing,” she added, saying there were four videos in the most serious category showing the rape of boys and girls as young as five.

Ms Mostafa said the victims shown included boys and girls, adding: “They have been clearly groomed and there is suggestion that these children are forced to smile at the camera.”

Tchorzewski also admitted possessing more than 500 images of extreme pornography, which mainly related to animations of characters from a popular children’s cartoon having incestuous sex.

He pleaded guilty to three counts of possessing indecent images of children and one of extreme pornography, including material depicting “an act which involved sexual interference with a corpse”.

Judge Anupama Thompson sentenced Tchorzewski to eight months’ imprisonment, which will run concurrently to his previous four-year sentence for possessing neo-Nazi terror manuals.

“It seems to me that as far as the public interest is concerned, there is nothing to be achieved from extending your sentence further from the one you are currently serving,” the judge added.

“Considerable time has passed since you were originally arrested and had things should be done as they should have, these would have been dealt with by the Central Criminal Court [during the terror case].”

Tchorzewski, wearing a blue-T-shirt and glasses, with a long hair and beard, remained impassive as he was sentenced on Wednesday.

The court heard that probation workers had been “trying to engage the defendant generally on his offending behaviour, but have not had a great deal of success”.

Robert English, for the defence, said Tchorzewski told him the images were downloaded when he was between 15 and 17.

“I asked him why he had those images and he says he was younger then, he had a curiosity, an interest,” he told the court.

“He has no interest now and it’s just something that occurred earlier in his life.”

Mr English said Tchorzewski was originally from Poland and had a “disjointed upbringing” moving between his father in that country and mother in the UK.

A pre-sentence report drawn up after his terror conviction said he was “self-contained and isolated”, had been bullied and struggled to form friendships and communicate.

Mr English said Tchorzewski was suspected to have autism spectrum disorder but there had been no formal diagnosis, adding: “These various traits … resulted in a lot of time spent alone on the internet.”

In September, he was jailed after pleading guilty to 10 counts of possessing documents useful to terrorists.

That court case heard that he also had Satanist literature depicting rape and paedophilia at his home.

The Metropolitan Police said Tchorzewski had “amassed a plethora of guides on terrorism, bomb making and gun production”.

He was friends with Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, a leading member of the banned neo-Nazi terrorist group Sonnekrieg Division.

Dunn-Koczorowski, who was a previous member of National Action, was jailed for terror offences last year after inciting terror attacks on targets including Prince Harry.

Co-defendant Michal Szewczuk, also a Polish national, ran a blog that encouraged the rape and torture of opponents, including small children, and Dunn-Koczorowski wrote about decapitating babies.

Tchorzewski’s phone contained several pictures of him and Dunn-Koczorowski posing with a Nazi flag and performing Hitler salutes.

Police found Tchorzewski had an array of extreme right-wing material praising Hitler, neo-Nazism, Satanism, antisemitism and calling for genocide.

At the time commander Richard Smith, head of the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command, said: “Tchorzewski’s obsession with neo-Nazism, terrorism and weaponry was not harmless curiosity.”

The Independent

Andrew Howard, 51, of Newton Heath, will be sentenced next month after pleading guilty to racially aggravated harassment

A man who left racist signs directed at his neighbour telling him ‘we don’t want Muslims here’, was found to be in possession of Nazi memorabilia.

Andrew Howard, 51, left the offensive signs and markings near to the man’s house after he moved in nearby.

Some of the messages read ‘you Muslim scum’ and ‘go back to your own country’, Manchester Magistrates Court heard.

Howard, of Newton Heath, was then found to have Nazi memorabilia around his house including pictures of Adolf Hitler and swastikas.

Today, Howard pleaded guilty to one charge of racially aggravated harassment.

He will be sentenced next month following the preparation of pre-sentence reports.

Briefly outlining the facts of the case, prosecutor Martha Dowd said the matter went back to April last year when the man moved in near to Howard, shortly before the incident took place.

“When he moved in he found a number of graffiti markings and signs which were racist in nature, such as ‘We don’t want Muslims here’, “You Muslim scum’ and ‘Go back to your own country’.”

“Following a search of the defendant’s property, officers found Nazi memorabilia, photographs of Hitler, confederate flags and swastikas.”

Howard was said to have no previous convictions.

In mitigation, his defence lawyer Karl Benson said: “The matters go back to 2019, he has lost his good character and he has never been before the court before.

“There is a significant amount of matters he has discussed with me that I think would be best addressed in a full probation report.

“I do believe a report would make a difference to the sentencing of the defendant.

“He is upset in regards to his actions.

“He tells me he has PTSD following his time in the army.

“I believe that to pull these strings would allow the court to understand what makes the defendant tick and how he can be rehabilitated.

“He could be facing a custodial sentence, so I do believe a report would impact the sentencing of the court.”

Manchester Evening News

A man has been jailed for racially abusing a mother as she walked to a fete with her two young children in Saffron Walden.

Terry Ralph, 60, was sentenced to 30 months for racial abuse at Chelmsford Crown Court. He was also sentenced for offences of burglary and failing to provide a specimen, which took place in other counties.

Ralph, of Howard de Walden Way, Newmarket, received convictions for breaching a suspended prison sentence and failing to appear at court. He has been banned from driving for 61 months.

The court was told last Wednesday (June 17) that at around 2pm on Sunday May 5, 2019, a woman visited a fete with her children and husband when she was approached by Ralph, who targeted her because of her appearance.

The racist was confronted by the woman’s husband and Essex Police officers arrived at the scene. Ralph made further comments which were captured on a body-worn camera.

Ralph failed to provide a specimen for police in Newmarket on August 19 last year and was arrested for a burglary at Boots in Cambridge on April 22 this year.

Investigating officer PC Daniel Ricketts, of Uttlesford’s local policing team, said: “Ralph targeted a woman and went out of his way to racially abuse her while she was visiting a fete with her two children and her husband.

“He has shown no remorse, and he was aggressive and unco-operative when he was being questioned that day.

“He intended to cause harassment to a family who were innocently out for the day.

“Ralph has also been sent to prison for other serious offences investigated by our policing partners – where he has time to consider his actions.”

Bishops Stortford Independent

He was one of three Teesside men arrested as the Met Police swooped on Wednesday, following violent clashes with police in Parliament Square

A Teesside man will face a crown court judge to be sentenced after taking part in a London demonstration which saw police officers attacked.

Three men in our region were arrested as the Met Police swooped in the early hours of Wednesday morning, after the violent protests in Parliament Square on June 13.

Two men from Middlesbrough, aged 44 and 40, were arrested on suspicion of violent disorder linked to the demonstration and have been released under investigation while inquiries continue.

But a third, Jamie Dewing, was charged and appeared from custody at Teesside Magistrates’ Court on Thursday morning.

The 31-year-old, of Wharton Place, Boosbeck, indicated a guilty plea to two charges – violent disorder and assault by beating of an emergency worker.

Dewing has been remanded in custody until he appears at Teesside Crown Court for sentence, at a date to be fixed.

Thousands marched on Parliament Square on June 13 as debate about historical monuments intensified, in the wake of a statue of slave trader Edward Colston being pulled down in Bristol during an earlier Black Lives Matter protest.

A statue of Winston Churchill in London was boarded up before the demonstration.

After the demo, Prime Minister Boris Johnson condemned the actions on display after officers were seen being punched and kicked.

And Andrew Banks, 28, of Stansted, Essex, has already been jailed after being photographed urinating at the Westminster memorial dedicated to PC Keith Palmer, during the protests.

PC Palmer, 48, was stabbed while on duty during the Westminster terror attack in March 2017.

The Met Police also confirmed on Wednesday that two London men, one aged 40 from Lewisham and another, aged 58 from Hammersmith and Fulham, were arrested in the early hours.

Since Saturday, six other men have been arrested on suspicion of violent disorder linked to the protests and released under police investigation, as inquiries continue.

The Met Police says it has arrested 258 after disorder at a number of gatherings across the capital, including an unlicensed party in Brixton.

Commander Bas Javid, from the Metropolitan Police Service, said: “When London witnessed the frankly unacceptable levels of violence during recent protests we said those actions would have consequences.

“During clashes with police, a small minority targeted officers with racial abuse or violence – pelting them with bottles, rocks or other items… it was deeply frustrating seeing them being so senselessly assaulted.”

The Gazette