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Andrew Howard now finds himself in jail

A man found with hoards of Nazi paraphernalia has been jailed for eight weeks after writing racist abuse at a prospective neighbour who wanted to move in across the road.

52-year-old Andrew Howard had watched the family from his doorstep as they viewed the empty house. The next day, he spray painted ‘We don’t want Muslims here’ across the front of the property, alongside signs stating: “No Muslims here, f*** off”, and “you’re not wanted here, you Musrat scum, f*** off back to your own country,” Manchester Magistrates Court heard.

The family were going to move into the house but, after Howard’s racist graffiti, decided against it.

A police search of Howard’s house revealed a vast array of racist items such as Nazi flags – that were hung inside – a hanging picture of Adolf Hitler, swastikas and copies of ‘Mein Kampf’

Officer’s also discovered a room containing ‘sophisticated radio equipment’ and numbers – the door to the room had a sign reading: “Do good for the community – shoot a P***”.

In a victim personal statement, the father of the family who viewed the house said: “We no longer want to move into the address.

“I don’t feel safe there with my family. I don’t feel like my children can play in the street, as I feel someone will harm them.

“I don’t feel like my wife can go outside as someone will harm her.

“This is the first time something like this has happened to me – why does someone have to hurt someone because of religion?

“I’m also worried because my wife wears Muslim dress and it’s made me fear for her safety in that area.”

Howard, of Newton Heath, pleaded guilty to one offence of racially aggravated harassment.

Outlining the facts of the case, prosecutor David Morgan said on April 18 last year, the victim and his family went to view the house, and being happy with it, they wished to take the tenancy.

“That day they noticed a male watching them on his doorstep across the road as they looked around the area,” Mr Morgan said.

“The next day they went to the house to find ‘we don’t want Muslims here’ spray painted on the front door.

“On the water pipe it said ‘No Muslims here, f**k off’.

“Then along the front of the property it said: ‘you’re not wanted here, you Musrat scum, f**k off back to your own country.’

“The family immediately left the house and pulled out of the tenancy.

“As a result of this graffiti, police undertook a house search of the defendant and they found a substantial amount of racist paraphernalia.

“This included three Nazi flags which were hung from the property, swastikas and books.

“There was also a room containing a large amount of sophisticated radio equipment and phone numbers, and on the front of the door a sign read: “Do good for the community, shoot a P***’.

“There was also a painting of Adolf Hilter which was on the wall and copies of ‘Mein Kampf’.

Howard was said to have no previous convictions.

In an earlier hearing, it was suggested that he had served time in the army and as a result suffered from PTSD.

However, following the preparation of a pre-sentence report and various investigations, this was proved not to be the case.

In mitigation, Howard’s defence lawyer Daniel Weed said: “In the pre-sentence report there is reference to the defendant serving in the army – that is not correct.
Manchester Evening News

Detectives investigating motive of suspected shooter who died in crash while trying to flee

Detectives are continuing to investigate the shooting of a children’s author and parish councillor whose suspected attacker died in a police chase after trying to flee on a motorcycle.

The victim, James Nash, 42, is critically ill in hospital after receiving serious head injuries during the daytime attack in the Hampshire village of Upper Enham. His wife, Sarah, a specialist in satellite technology, received minor injuries in the incident, which happened on Wednesday afternoon.

Police are still investigating the motive of the suspected attacker, Alex Sartain, 34, who lived near Nash. Sartain was a mechanic and was jailed in 2016 for theft while on a suspended sentence for assault and for driving while under the influence of drugs. On social media he followed pages dedicated to figures connected to German Nazis and once wrote “I come with a warning label”.

Police have not said what weapon was used in the attack but some local people have claimed it was a homemade shotgun.

Phil North, the leader of Test Valley borough council, sought to reassure residents, telling them officers were confident that the deceased rider was the perpetrator of the shooting.

Describing Nash as a “hands-on” councillor, North said: “I know James well and have worked with him on a number of projects … I’m still utterly shocked at this terrible incident.

“James is such a kind-hearted individual who cares deeply for his community. He is also a talented children’s author and illustrator and I was extremely touched last year when one of the dedications in his latest book was to my newborn daughter.”

He added: “My thoughts remain with James, his family and the people of Enham Alamein. I hope and pray that he makes a recovery. We’re all with you, James.”

Hampshire police said investigations were at an early stage but they did not believe there were any outstanding suspects.

Sartain is believed to have initially fled the scene on foot before trying to get away on a motorbike. He was involved in a fatal crash on an A-road about 3 miles from Nash’s home.

Nash, who is also an artist, has written children’s books including the self-illustrated The Winter Wild.

Kit Malthouse, the MP for north-west Hampshire, who is also the minister for crime and policing, said he had been briefed by a senior officer and that his thoughts were with the family.

The Guardian.

Zack Davies told onlookers that he had carried out the assault on Dr Sarandev Bhambra in revenge for the death of the soldier Lee Rigby

A loner fascinated with far right ideologies and violent video games screamed “white power” as he launched a racially-motivated machete and hammer attack on a dentist of Asian origin, a court has heard.

As he was led away by police, Zack Davies told onlookers that he had carried out the assault on Dr Sarandev Bhambra in revenge for the death of the soldier Lee Rigby, who was killed by Islamist extremists outside a barracks in south-east London.

He also later claimed that the British Isis terrorist nicknamed Jihadi John was an inspiration for the attack, which left 24-year-old Bhambra with terrible injuries to his head, back and hand.

Davies, 26, from Mold in north Wales, was found guilty of attempting to murder Bhambra, who is still recovering from his injuries.

Outside Mold crown court, Bhambra’s family argued Davies had committed an act of terrorism. They said if the men’s ethnicities had been reversed the family had no doubt it would have been reported as an act of terror.

Bhambra’s brother, Dr Tarlochan Singh Bhambra, said in a statement: “Sarandev was singled out because of the colour of his skin. We are in no doubt that had the racial disposition of this case been reversed this would be reported as an act of terror with a wider media coverage.

“We as a family have listened intently to the evidence … and are in no doubt given the racial and political motivation that this should be rightly defined as an act of terrorism. By his own admission Zack Davies had extreme neo-Nazi views and is a member of a white supremacist organisation.”

He said his brother, who was born in Leeds, was a young man of whom his family was immensely proud and who had just started out on his chosen career. “This cowardly assault has left him with life-changing injuries. Sarandev is currently undergoing an extensive programme of rehabilitation.”

Judge Rhys Rowlands sent Davies to a high security hospital for psychiatric reports to be prepared before he sentences him in September.

“I hold the view he is an incredibly dangerous young man. If it is not going to be a hospital order it will be the longest possible sentence,” the judge said. “Dr Bhambra sustained the most dreadful life-changing injuries during a sustained racist attack on an innocent man, a member of a caring profession.”

There was applause from the public gallery as the verdict was returned.

The jury had heard how Davies would sit in his flat playing violent video games for six or seven hours a day. Expelled from school at 11 for bringing in a knife to school, Davies became a loner and admitted carrying a weapon with him every day since he was 15 because of his growing paranoia.

On 14 January he spotted Bhambra on the street in Mold at lunchtime and followed him to a Tesco supermarket, where he attacked him from behind with a claw hammer and 30cm-long machete in front of shoppers and children.

Bhambra was saved after an ex-soldier, Peter Fuller, stepped in to help. Davies told Fuller: “We are under attack,” but Fuller said what he was doing was madness and Bhambra had not done anything.

Davies admitted saying “white power” and “I did it for Lee Rigby,” during and after the attack. He told the court: “I got very fascinated by Jihadi John and was inspired by him. I even had a mask.”

He was described in court as a racist with a fascination for far right ideologies. In interview he told police that maybe the wrong side had won the second world war. The court heard items associated with white supremacy and Nazism were found at Davies’s home, including swastika badges and Combat 18 material. Davies apologised in court to the family of Lee Rigby and to Bhambra.

Asked if he considered it an act of terrorism, DCI Alun Oldfield, of North Wales police, said: “In our view this was an attempted murder, racially motivated.”

Gareth Preston, senior crown prosecutor for the Crown Prosecution Service Wales, said: “Zackery Davies is a dangerous young man whose distorted and racist views led him to commit a terrifying act of violence. This was an attack against a complete stranger, singled out for no other reason than his ethnicity.”

The Guardian

A ‘well-respected’ member of the NEC staff was starting a five-year jail sentence today after being caught in possession of a stun gun and CS gas spray.

Craig Totney, left, and some of the weapons police seized

Craig Totney, left, and some of the weapons police seized

Craig Totney was also a follower of Blood & Honour, a neo-Nazi music promotion network and political group founded in 1987.

It is banned in some countries but not the UK and is composed of white nationalists with links to Combat 18.

The group organizes white power concerts by Rock Against Communism bands and distributes a magazine of the same name.

Totney, aged 40, was stopped on arrival at Birmingham International Airport from Germany by officials who seized his phone for analysis on May 22 last year, Wolverhampton Crown Court heard.
Halesowen raid

This led to a raid on his home in Bournebrook Crescent, Halesowen, by the West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit on November 13, said Miss Sophie Murray, prosecuting.

The swoop recovered a CS gas spray and stun gun together with fireworks, a baton, stab vest, machete, three knuckledusters and a Samurai sword.

These were all capable of being used in violent incidents but there was no evidence that they had been, the court was told.

The CS spray and a Taser were found at Totney’s home, while the torch Taser was at Hollingsworth’s home

National Front stickers, a Nazi arm band and right wing magazines were also recovered.

There were pictures of Hitler and right wing memorabilia among the phone data that further revealed Totney had been communicating with 32-year-old Ruth Hollingsworth, a woman he knew socially but one who classed herself as a ‘leftie.’

Among the subjects discussed was his offer of a Taser disguised as a torch, allegedly acquired via the internet from Lithuania.

She said she would not mind having one for her personal protection although she realised it was illegal.

Ruth Hollingsworth was given a suspended prison sentence

Hollingsworth turned down the additional offer of a knuckleduster, it was said.

Police raided her home in Cecil Road, Selly Park, Birmingham, on the same day as Totney’s house was searched and found the weapon still in its box with enough power to issue several charges.

The prosecution accepted she had been persuaded to take it by her co-accused who had tested a Taser on himself, the court heard.

Judge Nicholas Webb said Totney had been a highly regarded employee of the NEC but the evidence indicated he knew what he was doing with the weapons was illegal and a long sentence was required to deter others.

Totney, of previous good character, admitted possession of a CS gas spray and stun gun and transferring a stun gun to Hollingswood, who admitted possession of the weapon.

She received a two-year jail term suspended for two years with 150 hours unpaid work.

Express & Star

A vandal who scrawled antisemitic and neo-Nazi symbols on an MSP’s office window has been jailed for more than two years.

James Malcolm, 18, used red paint to draw symbols including a Star of David on a gallows at Rona Mackay’s office in Kirkintilloch.

He later caused £14,000 of damage to 27 headstones at a cemetery. A swastika symbol scribbled on broken glass was found at one of them. During a two-month crime spree Malcolm also vandalised a nature reserve and several parks in Kirkintilloch and used his own blood to write offensive slogans on the wall of a police cell.

Malcolm pleaded guilty at Glasgow sheriff court to four charges of behaving in a threatening or abusive manner, one charge of maliciously damaging headstones and writing offensive slogans on a cell between June 1 and August 9 last year. Sheriff Alan MacKenzie sentenced him to two years and four months in prison.

The court was told that a member of the public spotted graffiti on a glass notice board at Lenzie Moss nature reserve on July 17. Nazi slogans and symbols were scrawled in blue paint and “James M” was scratched on a sign.

On July 23 Malcolm graffitied in red paint on a bridge above the path leading to Luggie Park. Days later a dog walker saw “Adolf Hitler” and “white power” among other phrases. Mark Allan, the procurator fiscal depute, said: “She was offended and appalled by what she saw, in particular a picture of the Star of David on a hangman’s noose.”

On July 24 Malcolm vandalised the window of Ms Mackay’s office with a red paint marker. Mr Allan said that the writing again included antisemitic and neo-Nazi symbols. The next day an employee contacted the police.

When officers went to Malcolm’s home the walls were covered with antisemitic and Nazi slogans, including “death to all Jews”. Mr Allan said Malcolm “stated that he was looking to shock people with his messages so that they would wake up and see the truth”. While Malcolm was in custody he smeared swastikas and other symbols on the walls of his cell in his own blood.

Mr Allan said that on August 9, after Malcolm had been bailed, police were given information that he had damaged gravestones at Old Aisle Cemetery in Kirkintilloch, where there are 38 graves of Commonwealth service personnel.

The Times

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism

A 17-year-old boy from west London has pleaded guilty to terror offences linked to the neo-Nazi group Sonnenkrieg Division.

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism.

He entered guilty pleas during an Old Bailey preliminary hearing.

A court order that prevented his identification was lifted by the judge.

He will be sentenced at a later date and will next appear on 25 February.

The charges state that in August this year Dunn-Koczorowki used accounts on the Gab social media site – including one for the Sonnenkrieg Division itself – to post material that would encourage others to prepare or engage in acts of terrorism.

He will be sentenced at a later date and will next appear the Old Bailey on 25 February 2019.

A co-defendant – Michael Szewczuk, 18, from Leeds – also appeared in court, but has not yet entered pleas.

Mr Szewczuk, a Polish national, is charged with five counts of encouraging terrorism and three of disseminating terrorist publications.

A provisional trial date was fixed for 13 May 2019 at Manchester Crown Court.

Both defendants were granted conditional bail.

BBC News

James Malcolm also painted a Star of David hanging from a gallows on an MSP’s office and knocked over war graves during his campaign of hate.

A vandal scrawled anti-Semitic and neo-Nazi symbols on an MSPs office window.

James Malcom, 18, used red paint to write the symbols, including a Star of David being hung on gallows, at Rona MacKay’s Kirkintolloch office.

He then caused £14,000 of damage to 27 headstones at a cemetery with a Nazi swastika symbol scribbled on broken glass found at one of them.

During his two-month crime spree, Malcolm yelled “Heil Hitler” at a terrified 16-year-old in a park.

He vandalised Lenzie Moss Nature Reserve and Waverly and Luggie Park in Kirkintilloch, East Dunbartonshire, and used his blood to write offensive slogans on the wall of a police cell.

James Malcolm scrawled anti-Semitic and neo-Nazi symbols on an MSPs office window

James Malcolm scrawled anti-Semitic and neo-Nazi symbols on an MSPs office window

Malcolm pled guilty at Glasgow Sheriff Court to four charges of behaving in a threatening or abusive manner, a charge of maliciously damaging headstones and writing offensive slogans on a cell between June 1 and August 9, this year.

The court heard a member of the public spotted graffiti on a glass notice board at Lenzie Moss Nature Reserve on July 17.

He saw “Glory to marches and enemies to the point of no return” in blue paint, along with Nazi slogans and symbols as well as “James M”, scratched on to a sign among the post.

Procurator fiscal depute Mark Allan said the man was “offended and horrified” and took a picture then reported it to the police.

On July 23, Malcolm graffitied in red paint on a bridge above the main path leading to Luggie Park.

Days later a dog-walker saw “Adolf Hitler”, “All N*****s must hang” and “white power” among other phrases.

Mr Allan said: “She was offended and appalled by what she saw, in particular a picture of the Star too David on a hangman’s noose, which reminded her of a personal tragic event.”

She contacted the police who took a note of the full text on the bridge.

The cost of the damage was £500 for the removal of the graffiti.

On July 24, Malcolm was with a group of younger teenagers who ran off when he began to vandalise the window at Miss MacKay’s office with a red paint marker.

Mr Allan said the writing again included anti-Semitic and neo-Nazi symbols.

The following day an employee “felt uncomfortable about the content” of the vandalism and contacted the police.

Investigations lead to Malcolm and officers went to his house to speak to him.

The court heard when they went into his home they saw the walls were covered with anti-Semitic and Nazi slogans including “death to all jews” and “death to all non whites”.

He was taken to London Road police office to be interviewed.

Mr Allan added: “He initially made no comment, however when being asked about the phrases on the bridge he admitted he was responsible and when shown photographs he began to explain the correct phrases, symbols and icons and provided meaning and context.

“He also stated that he was looking to shock people with his messages so that they would wake up and see the truth.

“He didn’t see anything wrong with what he had done however stated that he was getting punished because it was the establishment’s rules.”

Malcolm said he didn’t intend to hurt anybody and only want get his messages out.

When he was held in custody to attend at court, he smeared swastikas and other symbols on the walls of his cell with his own blood.

Having been bailed at court, Malcolm shouted Nazi phrases at a 16-year-old at Waverly Park and threatened him with a Buckfast bottle.

He left the park after he was told by two passers-by that they had contacted the police.

Mr Allan said that on August 9, police were given information that Malcolm had damaged and pushed over grave stones at Old Aisle Cemetery in Kirkintilloch.

The court heard there are 38 graves of Commonwealth service personnel from the first and second World Wars in the graveyard and this is signposted.

When police arrived they saw several headstones had been pushed over and that the damage appeared fresh with the soil newly turned over.

Mr Allan continued: “A total of 27 headstones within different sections of the cemetery had been damaged.

“Some had been pushed over and some had been broken in two. Two of the headstones appeared to have had glass bottles smashed off them.

“At one of the headstones they found a small piece of broken glass with writing which included a Nazi swastika and Germanic runes.

The court was told the damage is £14,000 although that may go up as some headstones will need more work than others.

When he was later arrested Malcolm told police “I know I shouldn’t have done it, I don’t know why.”

Sheriff Alan MacKenzie deferred sentence until a later date and Malcolm was remanded.

Daily Record

After members of the neo-Nazi group National Action are jailed we look back at the racist member of right wing groups who was convicted of terrorism in Grimsby

He claimed to be a peaceful right wing activist in Grimsby who wanted to stand up for Britain’s “indigenous” people.

But loner Nathan Worrell was the secret neo-Nazi in Cromwell Street, a twisted racist who was trying to build bombs in his kitchen, inspired by a notorious nail bombing killer.

Even 10-years later, the trial of Worrell remains one of the most dramatic and truly horrifying cases that has been heard at Grimsby Crown Court.

And following the jailing of a cell of neo-Nazis and white supremacists last week for terrorism offences – including a couple who named their son Adolf – the similarities to the Worrell case are stark.

Both cases shone a light into the lives of right wing extremists and why anti-terrorism investigators now believe they hold as much of a threat as Islamist terrorist groups like ISIS.

At first, Worrell’s activities appeared to be limited to a vile campaign targeting a mixed race couple in the Willows Estate.

Officers were alerted after Worrell plastered stickers outside the home of a mother-of-one – branding her a “race-mixing slut”.

Flat full of Nazi literature

He focused his hate campaign on her and her husband, who was Bangladeshi born, and put stickers on the couple’s rear gate and on a lamp post near their home, reading: “Only inferior white women date outside their race. Be proud of your heritage. Don’t be a race-mixing slut.”

But, when police visited his flat in Cromwell Street, a much more worrying picture emerged that was to lead to a full blown terrorism investigation.

At first Worrell refused to let officers into his home but they forced their way in.

Inside, they discovered stacks of racist and neo-Nazi material, including five different types of sticker which had appeared outside the couple’s home in the Willows Estate.

Nathan Worrell was a member of a number of right-wing neo-Nazi groups and had expressed support for Soho killer David Copeland in items seized from his flat in Cromwell Road

Nathan Worrell was a member of a number of right-wing neo-Nazi groups and had expressed support for Soho killer David Copeland in items seized from his flat in Cromwell Road

But it was only then that the true horrific nature of what Worrell was doing became apparent.

There were numerous bomb-making manuals and the raw ingredients to make explosive devices. These included instructions on how to make detonators and what ingredients were needed for bombs.

He had bought fireworks and dozens of boxes of matches. What appeared to be an amateur attempt to make explosives actually used similar methods as neo-Nazi David Copeland, a right wing extremist who killed three people, including a pregnant woman, in a series of nail bomb attacks in London in 1999.

In fact among hundreds of Nazi pamphlets, leaflets, stickers and books was one with a chilling reference to the Soho killer. ‘Stand by Dave Copeland’, it said. ‘Leaderless resistance works. Combat 18 in the area!’

Shortly before Worrell’s arrest, the High Court in London ruled that Copeland should remain in prison for at least 50 years, ruling out his release until 2049 at the earliest, when he would be 73.

Worrell’s hoard of far-right material also included references to Adolf Hitler, the Nazi Party and the Ku Klux Klan. Extremist groups represented included Combat 18, with the 18 derived from Adolf Hitler’s initials. Other leaflets and flyers mentioned ‘Cleethorpes Combat 18’.

It was later discovered Worrell had also been a member of right-wing groups, the White Nationalist Party, the British People’s Party, the National Front, the Ku Klux Klan and the British National Party. Like Copeland, a fascination with Nazi and right wing ideology had progressed to actively becoming involved with the groups and then researching home made explosive devices and detonators.

Experts told the trial Worrell’s experiments included dismantling the fireworks in a way which could be used to build explosive devices and police suspected he had been starting to assemble a crude pipe bomb in a coffee jar when he was caught.

During the trial, Worrell denied possessing articles for terrorism purposes, including documents for making explosives and incendiary devices, 171 match heads, a large quantity of matches, several tubs of sodium chlorate, fireworks containing black powder, and containers of lighter fluid.

He also denied a racially aggravated public order offence by displaying racist stickers with intent to cause the mixed-race couple harassment, alarm or distress.

The court heard that he held “far-right political views”. When interviewed by police, he described himself as a white nationalist. He said he believed that this country belonged exclusively to white people – and that he was fighting for this country in a peaceful manner.

References to nail bomber David Copeland were found in Nathan Worrell's flat in Grimsby

References to nail bomber David Copeland were found in Nathan Worrell’s flat in Grimsby

But the prosecution claimed: “He was not merely a peaceful right-wing activist. He had more sinister, violent intentions.

“The very nature of the sticker campaign shows this defendant was not merely a collector of extreme right-wing items, but was active in taking steps to promote his ideology.

“He was plainly targeting ethnic minorities as part of his extreme right-wing views,” the prosecution claimed.

Heil Hitler texts

He had far-right political pamphlets and books – much of it Nazi – in his flat and he signed off text messages with “88”, a code for Heil Hitler. “He is undoubtedly a racist who follows the political views of the National Socialist or Nazi Party,” said the prosecution.

There were books giving two recipes for ‘how to make explosives’ and information on how to buy ordinary products which could be used. He had a large number of fireworks, some of which had been tampered with in order to remove the gun powder.

Other books in Worrell’s bedroom covered subjects including murder, contract killers and hit men, arson as a means of attack, guerrilla warfare, leaderless resistance and more references to nail bomber Copeland.

Worrell sent racist text messages to a friend in reaction to watching two television programmes, Crimewatch, and a documentary featuring David Baddiel about compensation owed to the Jewish Community following the Second World War.

He also had a Death’s Head as the wallpaper on one of his three mobile phones. He told police he supported Combat 18 “in terms of some of their policies”, but did not believe in taking violent action. He denied ever specifically ordering material from Combat 18. Some stickers he had, but claimed not to have ordered, referred to a “Cleethorpes Combat 18”.

He admitted distributing stickers for far-right political groups, sticking them on lamp posts and junction boxes around Grimsby. When asked what he thought the effect of such stickers would be on any minority groups living in the area, he said: “I don’t know. I don’t associate with them.”

One text included an image of Adolf Hitler with a halo round him and another attacked the country’s immigration policies and called Britain a “cesspit for scum”.

Just a sad loner, claimed defence

The defence portrayed Worrell as a “slightly sad loner” who had long standing far-right wing beliefs but could not even drive or afford to go to rallies and meetings.

They claimed his activism was limited to “leafleting” and denied there was any bomb plot.

Grimsby Crown Court heard Nathan Worrell had been trying to assemble bombs using gunpowder from fireworks, pictured here, and chemicals in the same way as Soho nail bomber David Copeland

Grimsby Crown Court heard Nathan Worrell had been trying to assemble bombs using gunpowder from fireworks, pictured here, and chemicals in the same way as Soho nail bomber David Copeland

“He is not a terrorist,” claimed the defence, which branded the prosecution case “completely over the top” and accused it of throwing“ everything, including the kitchen sink” at the case.

Worrell did not give evidence at his trial and in January 2008 he was convicted by the jury in less than four hours.

He was jailed for seven years and three months. It included six years for the terrorist offence, with a consecutive 15 months for the racist public order offence.

Judge John Reddihough told Worrell: “Perhaps the least I say about the extreme views you hold and the way we saw you express them in the documents and other items before the court, the better.

“Maybe the citizens of this country are entitled to hold such views but what they are not entitled to do is embark on criminal offences in furtherance of those extreme views.”

He told Worrell: “You were in possession of a large number of instruction manuals for making explosive and other devices that could be used to harm innocent people.

“You were in possession of other items which appeared to advocate the use of violence to promote the extreme right-wing views you held.

“Courts in this country must make it clear that terrorism, in any form, will not be tolerated.

“Any offence which involves any step towards terrorist acts must be firmly punished.”

Right win extremist Nathan Worrell who was convicted of terrorism offences in Grimsby

Right win extremist Nathan Worrell who was convicted of terrorism offences in Grimsby

After the case, it emerged that Worrell was born in Cleethorpes and grew up in Grimsby with his mother and sister. The last school he attended was Havelock School, Grimsby, and he was believed to have worked for a warehouse in the town as a packer. He also had a job picking cabbages.

At the time of his arrest, he was unemployed and was not believed to have held any long-term employment since leaving school.

After the sentencing, the husband targeted by Worrell’s racist leaflets said: “It is not long enough. He will be out in three or four years. He will probably come out and still hold the same racist beliefs.”

Worrell appealed against his sentence which was rejected.

It is thought Worrell was released in 2011 and his whereabouts are currently unknown.

Grimsby Telegraph

Sirrs was jailed for more than 12 years for his part in horrific racist attacks on Middle Eastern immigrants in Hull

Drug dealer Christopher Sirrs has this week been orders to pay back £3,000 from his ill-gotten gains – but he hides a shocking racist past.

Sirrs, 44, was one of two racist ringleaders who led a violent neo-Nazi campaign against asylum-seekers in Hull 14 years ago.

Sirrs was handed a 14-and-a-half year sentence which was cut to 12-and-a-half years on appeal, while his thug cohort Ben Povey was handed a 19-year sentence reduced to 15 years on appeal.

Bloodthirsty guttersnipes

During sentence, the judge at the time described them as “bloodthirsty guttersnipes”.

Povey and Sirrs mowed down an Iraqi asylum-seeker, sending him flying into the air “like a rag doll” and shattering his leg in three places. Later Povey, when asked about the attack, said to his girlfriend: “They should all die.”

Mugshots of Christopher Sirrs (left) and Ben Povey who was jailed in 2004 for racial violence

Mugshots of Christopher Sirrs (left) and Ben Povey who was jailed in 2004 for racial violence

It was just one of a serious of violent scenes which brought Hull’s racial tensions to melting point in the searing heat of July 2004.

Gang warfare

The city had become a battleground as gangs clashed in the streets, brandishing lead pipes, baseball bats, Samurai swords and planks of wood studded with nails. Cars were set alight with petrol bombs.

Judge Tom Cracknell said at the time the men were sentenced: “I regard Sirrs and Povey as very dangerous young men. They have not shown one moment of remorse about their conduct.”

Christopher Sirrs

Christopher Sirrs

The pair had joined the Hull Cruise Club – a group which spent its evenings driving souped-up cars around the streets.

Sirrs, then 30, was adept at manipulating younger members of a club which until then was described by police as a “nuisance rather than a menace”.

Thug who thinks he has a brain

Detective Inspector Mark Smith, the officer in charge, speaking after the men were sentenced said: “Sirrs is just a thug who thinks he has a brain.

“He likes to have people around him, likes to have muscle, and he seems to command respect among this element. [He] wouldn’t think twice about just petrol-bombing your house or car.”

Trouble flared in 2004 when a group of immigrants began driving their cars around the same area as the club. A minor clash led to a series of battles with cars being rammed or smashed up with baseball bats.

In mid-July Povey smashed the windscreen of a Vauxhall car driven by immigrants while Sirrs threw a petrol bomb at the vehicle. They pursued it with Povey swinging a Samurai sword from the open sunroof.

Mowed down

A few days later, two immigrants made the mistake of parking their car in the area before going out to a nightclub.

They returned in the early hours to be met by a gang hurling racist abuse because they believed they were among a group of Kosovans who had damaged the club’s cars.

One was hit with a baseball bat and the two fled up the street, with Sirrs and Povey in pursuit.

The car being driven by Sirrs, with Povey as passenger, crossed the central reservation and ploughed into the other man, sending him flying into the air, before driving off. Other members of the gang stayed to abuse the Iraqi with racist taunts as he lay there injured and in pain.

The attack led to further tension as members of the local immigrant community clashed violently with the gang members.

Witness intimidation

Sirrs and Povey had also tried to intimidate witnesses. Povey fire-bombed a car belonging to the family of a witness while both telephoned him to get him to change his statement.

Povey was convicted of causing Mr Mohammed grievous bodily harm with intent by a jury at Hull Crown Court. He was also jailed for making petrol bombs, intimidating witnesses, arson, violent disorder and possession of an offensive weapon.

Sirrs was jailed for grievous bodily harm, which he admitted, and convicted of possession of a Samurai sword and nail-embedded pickaxe handle, making an explosive substance, violent disorder and perverting the course of justice.

Others were also jailed following that summer of madness for assaults, arson, making explosives and violent disorder.

Sirrs has continued his life of crime and is back in jail after admitting possession of amphetamine with intent to supply and possessing criminal property.

Hull Daily Mail

A SOLDIER jailed for hate crimes after taunting a woman with racially abusive WhatsApp messages has been revealed to be an Irishman from Dublin.

Graham Bolger, a 23-year-old British Army Guardsman, sent a number of racially abusive comments about Turkish people and Muslims to a woman between July 2017 and November 2017.

The shamed soldier was thrown out of the Army after his messages were exposed in court.

The Sun reports that Bolger, who talked about killing Muslim children and claimed to be a Nazi, is originally from Clondalkin in west Dublin.

He was sentenced to 24 weeks in prison at Uxbridge Magistrates’ Court in January after admitting two offences of intentionally causing harassment, alarm or distress which was racially or religiously aggravated.

His sentence was later uplifted from 16 weeks to 24 weeks after the CPS convinced the court that Bolger’s actions amount to a hate crime.

Videos played at Bolger’s trial showed the Dubliner performing a Nazi salute in his army uniform at the Infantry Training Centre in North Yorkshire.

Graham Bolger making a Nazi salute in uniform, and right, back home in Dublin last year (Image: CPS)

Graham Bolger making a Nazi salute in uniform, and right, back home in Dublin last year (Image: CPS)

His messaging of the woman was described as a campaign of hate – in one instance telling her that he joined the Army to “wipe out” Muslims.

He also told her that Hitler was “brilliant” and praised the Holocaust, branding Jews “money-grabbing c***s”.

After an internal review was ordered by General Sir Nick Carter, Bolger was promptly kicked out of the British Army.

“The Army has concluded its considerations in relation to this case, but we are not prepared to release any personal information about this individual,” said an Army spokesperson.

“We have a common law and Data Protection Act duty to protect the personal information of our employees and there is no good reason to release personal information in this case.”

CPS prosecutor Joyce Kerrins said Bolger’s conduct was “made worse” by his racially abusive comments.

She added: “Where a hate crime has been committed the CPS will always apply to the court to apply the law and give an ‘uplifted’ sentence which properly fully reflects the nature of the crime.

“The evidence provided by the prosecution, following a thorough police investigation, included social media messages and witness testimony and was pivotal to him pleading guilty to his crimes.

“I hope this prosecution empowers other victims of hate crimes to come forward and stop others from also being subjected to vile abuse.”

Irish Post