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A MOTHER and her son were injured during a racially aggravated attack in Breightmet earlier this year, which resulted in one of the victims needing brain surgery.

Dale Hart outside Bolton Crown Court

The pair had been walking to a bus stop on their way to church, the 15-year-old son, Ray Nhial, had run ahead to make sure they caught the bus and ran past Dale Hart, who was walking in the opposite direction with his partner and child in a pram.

Bolton Crown Court heard how Hart thought Ray had hit or nudged the pram running past and said “watch where you’re going” or words to that effect.

A scuffle ensued the court was told by Colin Buckle, prosecuting, and Hart punched Ray. In the course of the scuffle Ray’s mother, Nyawig Mantywil Wor may have been struck as well.

Hart admitted in his plea that he had hurled racist abuse at the family.

The court was shown CCTV footage of the incident which happened in Padbury Way, Breightmet on Sunday, June 3 at about 2pm.

From the CCTV it was clear said The Honorary Recorder of Bolton, Judge Martin Walsh that “there was no contact between Ray and the pram.”

Judge Walsh said: “You challenged him and after a verbal exchange, attacked him and punched him to the face.”

He added that: “It is apparent from the footage that you were the aggressor.”

The CCTV shows Mrs Wor stepping in to break the pair up, Judge Walsh said: “It is clear her actions were not aggressive but were designed and intended to bring an end to the scuffle… As the incident was being brought to an end you shouted racist abuse towards Ray Nhial and his family.”

Rosalind Scott Bell, defending, told the court: “He has to and did accept that in the heat of the moment he used language that was deeply offensive and he recognises such language is utterly inappropriate and he is contrite.

“The only matter Mr Hart was really concerned I conveyed was an apology to Mrs Wor and Ray themselves.”

Mrs Scott Bell told the court that Hart had been living in Glasgow with family for six months “for his own protection” and had been unable to return home in the last two weeks before sentencing because of concerning social media posts.

Mrs Scott Bell added: “He did accept he was the aggressor and they were his words.”

Following the incident the family got on the 561 First Bus and it drove away, however Mrs Wor became dizzy on the bus and got off to sit at another bus stop where she collapsed and was drifting in and out of consciousness.

Police officers and paramedics attended her and she was taken to Royal Bolton Hospital. There after a CT Scan it was discovered she hat a two brain bleeds and her brain had shifted inside her skull, requiring emergency surgery to relieve the pressure.

Mr Buckle told the court Mrs Wor was at a greater risk of brain bleeds because of a medical condition.

Yesterday the offender, Hart, aged 29, of Grantchester Way, Breightmet received a 12 month sentence, suspended for two years for affray and racially aggravated assault.

He must also complete 30 days of rehabilitation and carry out 180 hours unpaid work.

Bolton News

A HOODED raider wearing gloves, a face mask and dark glasses was allowed to rob a bank because the manager was worried about offending him in case he had a skin condition.

Simon Jones, 38, queued behind other customers in Bishop Auckland for 15 minutes wearing blue latex gloves, a hooded top pulled up, a face mask and dark glasses. He was also carrying a bottle of Febreze and a hold-all

Simon Jones, 38, queued behind other customers in Bishop Auckland for 15 minutes wearing blue latex gloves, a hooded top pulled up, a face mask and dark glasses. He was also carrying a bottle of Febreze and a hold-all

 

Simon Jones, 38, queued behind other customers in Bishop Auckland for 15 minutes wearing blue latex gloves, a hooded top pulled up, a face mask and dark glasses. He was also carrying a bottle of Febreze and a hold-all.

Not surprisingly customers and some of the staff strongly suspected he was up to no good and another person in the line was so concerned he took a photograph of Jones.

However, Durham crown Court heard that manager Gemma Hughes only asked whether she could help him as he stood in line and was worried about causing offence in case his strange attire was needed for a skin condition.

Jones was able to continue waiting until he reached the front of the line where he handed over a note to cashier Victoria Smith telling her he had acid and a bomb.

Terrified Miss Smith bundled £370 into Jones’ hold-all and he was able to escape.

Despite being petrified she had the presence of mind to hand over a decoy £1,000 bundle which contained a Nat West-approved tracking device.

But the bank’s humiliation was complete when the device failed to work and if it had not been for members of the public reporting Jones’ car he may never have been caught.

Prosecutor Jane Waugh told the court that Jones had researched how to rob a bank online and took his girlfriend’s red Ford Fiesta when she went to walk her dog on May 17 this year.

He drove to the Nat West but instead of bursting in and going to the desk he chose to stand in line.

Miss Waugh said: “Suspicions were aroused because of the appearance of the defendant and the fact he was rather obviously trying to avoid the security cameras.

“One customer said he “didn’t look quite right” and the police were called because of their suspicions.

“The manager approached the defendant as he waited in the queue and asked if she could help him. He replied no.”

Judge Christopher Prince questioned Miss Waugh about the manager’s actions.

He asked: “So it was a hot day, he was wearing a coat with the hood up, carrying a big bottle of Febreze, wearing sunglasses, a face mask, blue plastic gloves and yet he was just observed as he made his way to the front of the queue where Victoria Smith was left to be threatened by a man who said he had a bomb and acid?”

After taking advice, Miss Waugh explained: “The manager was concerned he might have had a skin condition because he waited patiently in the queue.

“She went to speak to him to find out if everything was alright.

“She tread a careful line between upsetting someone who might have had to wear such things to protect their skin or have a nasty motive for wearing such a disguise.”

Jones, from West Auckland, County Durham, admitted robbery and taking his girlfriend’s car without consent.

He was jailed for 40 months by Judge Prince who described the robbery as planned but unsophisticated.

The judge said that he did not want to criticise anyone in the bank for their actions that day.

But he added: “Whilst it might be understandable not to want to offend someone with a skin condition, such were the circumstances here it is perhaps only due to time constraints on staff in the bank that a lot more was not done to spare Victoria Smith from the situation that arose.

“She was left to face him one to one over the counter and was left in fear as to what might happen.”

The court heard that Victoria had spent months off work and was only now in the process of returning to duty.

In a statement she said she relived the moment she faced Jones in nightmares which kept her awake.

She said: “I felt like I was in a parallel universe where this was not happening to me. There were children in the bank in pushchairs, other staff and numerous customers. We all could have been hurt by the actions of this person.”

Gemma Hughes also made a statement after the robbery, saying: “My staff were terrified. I feel nervous for the staff and nervous opening up the branch tomorrow.”

Christoper Baker, for Jones, said he’d suffered a brain injury three years ago which had caused him “cognitive difficulties” and the Febreze bottle had actually contained Febreze and not acid as he’d said.

Jones, he said, had addictions to gambling and alcohol but had written letters for the staff to say that he was “genuinely sorry” for what he had done.

PC Andy Denham, from South Durham CID, said afterwards: “This was a planned and thought-out offence which terrified the bank staff and customers and has had a long-term effect on those who witnessed it.

“Fortunately, due to the vigilance of the local community who were in and around the bank that day, along with the help of the community in Coundon, the vehicle used by Jones was identified that same day, along with the clothing worn by Jones and the Febreze bottle.

“We were then able to swiftly identify, locate and arrest him and minimise the long-term effects of the robbery on the bank staff by placing Jones in custody at the earliest opportunity.”

Northern Echo

Drunken Leah Neville, aged 44, called officers after seeing herself on the local news

Racist alcoholic Leah Neville spat and kicked a police officer

Racist alcoholic Leah Neville spat and kicked a police officer

A half-naked racist alcoholic attacked a policeman after seeing herself on the television news, a court heard.

Drunken Leah Neville, aged 44, called officers herself after seeing footage of her abusive behaviour in a takeaway on BBC Spotlight.

Police attended after she threatened to take an overdose but she ended up lashing out at officers, Plymouth Crown Court heard.

Neville had taken off her trousers because she had spilt water over them from a cat’s bowl.

She was jailed for 14 months for a string of offences.

Judge Paul Darlow said: “You unleashed a torrent of foul-mouthed abuse at a businessman in a takeaway simply trying to serve the public.

“Taken together (these offences) demonstrate a clear pattern of alcohol and prescription drug-fuelled violent behaviour. You have come to the end of the road.”

Neville, of Cecil Street, Stonehouse, admitted assaulting a police officer in the execution of his duty on October 14.

She admitted racially-aggravated threatening behaviour at the Stoke Grill on April 16.

The offences put her in breach of a 10-month suspended prison sentence imposed last year for another racially-aggravated threatening behaviour offence.

Hollie Gilbery, for the Crown Prosecution Service, said Neville demanded to be served in the takeaway. But she was told she was banned because of her previous bad behaviour.

She then started to abuse worker Warven Saadi, saying: “I will kill you, I will slice open your throat.”

The court heard she also told him to “go back to your own country”

Miss Gilbery said that Neville twice threw menus at Mr Saadi. He later told police he felt “embarrassed and upset”.

She added that Neville called police on October 14, apparently having seen the takeaway incident on the regional television news.

Miss Gilberry said officers attended but she became violent, spitting and kicking out at one male constable. She also ripped an epaulette from his shoulder.

The barrister said that during the incident she knocked the water from a cat’s bowl over her legs – and insisted on taking off her trousers.

Miss Gilberry said that officers were forced to call a female colleague because of her state of undress.

Nick Lewin, for Neville, said: “She is obviously a very pathetic individual. She is a very confused woman.”

He pointed to a probation report which helped explain her behaviour – factors which were not aired in court.

Mr Lewin said: “It clearly provides an explanation as to why she has an unhealthy relationship with alcohol. She is a classic alcoholic.

“She cannot it seems make that break. She is gradually falling apart physically and mentally.”

He added she had serious and long-term mental health dificulties.

The barrister said the was on a range of different medications.

Mr Lewin said there had been some “limited success” on her community order.

He added: “She is not a bad woman, she really is not a bad woman”.

Mr Lewin asked for a month’s remand in custody to provide her with an “immediate detoxification”. She would then be sentenced in January.

Plymouth Herald

A Barnsley killer who has spent the first night of a life sentence behind bars has shown no remorse for his actions, detectives have revealed.

Ricky Ramsden, aged 27 and formerly of Dodworth Road, was jailed for life yesterday after being found guilty of the murder of 39-year-old Dawid Szubert in Barnsley town centre in June.

He was ordered to serve a minimum of 17 years behind bars for killing Mr Szubert in broad daylight as he lay unconscious near the Civic Gardens after taking the drug Spice.

Ramsden stamped on his victim’s head, triggering a cardiac arrest and Mr Szubert was pronounced dead at the scene.

South Yorkshire Police said the killer had ‘taken exception’ to Mr Szubert having taken Spice and had shown no remorse for the murder.

Detective Chief Inspector Steve Whittaker said: “The brutality and callousness shown by Ramsden is as shocking as it is appalling and throughout our inquiry, he has shown no remorse for his actions and has continued to deny his involvement in Mr Szubert’s death.

“The court heard that on that day Mr Szubert, a Polish national who had lived in Barnsley for approximately two years, had taken the drug spice and was laid unconscious.

“Ramsden took exception to this, walked over to Mr Szubert and stamped on his head, stating that he was sick of seeing spice heads.”

Sheffield Star

A MAN has admitted starting a scuffle which left a mother critically injured with bleeds on the brain.

Dale Hart was due to stand trial at Bolton Crown Court yesterday accused of causing racially aggravated grievous bodily harm to the woman and racially aggravated assault of the woman’s teenage son.

The court heard how the woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, suffers from a disease which affects her kidneys, stops her blood clotting in the usual way and makes her more susceptible to bleeding.

The woman and her three children were walking along Padbury Way on June 3 and Hart was heading along the pavement in the opposite direction.

Judge Martin Walsh was told how 29-year-old Hart believed the woman’s son had bumped into the pram being pushed by his partner and the court was shown CCTV, taken from a nearby bus, of the defendant aggressively confronting the boy. Hart swung a punch at the teenager, and made racially insulting remarks, as the mother and the rest of her family tried to intervene.

A scuffle ensued and, shortly afterwards, the woman collapsed with two subdural haematomas, bleeds on the brain, which needed surgery.

After discussions between the prosecution and defence Hart, of Grantchester Way, Breightmet ,pleaded guilty to affray and racially aggravated assault of the boy.

Colin Buckle, prosecuting, said: “It cannot be said with any degree of certainty when, during the incident, that the subdural haematoma began.” But he added that Hart’s behaviour had started the incident.

Rosalind Scott-Bell, defending, said: “He is a man who has previous convictions, albeit non for the last 10 years. It is out of character for him now to behave in such a way. Something quite clearly went wrong that day.”

Judge Walsh adjourned sentencing until Friday to allow pre-sentence reports to be prepared on Hart. “The fact that I am asking for a report and extending his bail is no indication of the sentence,” he added.

Bolton News

An avowed supporter of neo-Nazi beliefs who took part in the violent and chaotic white supremacist “Unite the Right” rally in this city last year was found guilty Friday of first-degree murder for killing a woman by ramming his car through a crowd of counterprotesters.

A jury of seven women and five men began deliberating Friday morning and took just over seven hours to reach its decision that James Alex Fields Jr., 21, of Maumee, Ohio, acted with premeditation when he backed up his 2010 Dodge Challenger and then roared it down a narrow downtown street crowded with counterprotesters, slamming into them and another car. Heather D. Heyer, 32, was killed and 35 others injured, many grievously.

The deadly attack in the early afternoon of August 12, 2017 culminated a dark 24 hours in this quiet college town. It was marked by a menacing torchlight march through the University of Virginia campus the night before, with participants shouting racist and anti-Semitic insults, and wild street battles on the morning of the planned rally between white supremacists and those opposing their ideology.

As the sounds and images of brutal beatings, bloodied faces and hate-filled chants spread across the country and around the world, this city quickly became identified with the emergence of a new order of white supremacy that no longer felt compelled to hide in the shadows or the safety of online anonymity.

Many in their emboldened ranks shouted fascist slogans, displayed Nazi swastikas and Confederate battle flags and extended their arms in Sieg Heil salutes. And many also wore red Make America Great Again hats, saying they were encouraged in the public display of their beliefs by President Trump, who later that week would say that there were “very fine people” on both sides of the demonstration.

Fields’s conviction followed six days of testimony in Charlottesville Circuit Court, where Heyer’s deadly injuries were detailed and survivors of the crash described the chaos and their own injuries. Jeanne Peterson, 38, who limped to the witness stand with the help of bailiffs, said she’d had five surgeries and would have another next year. Wednesday Bowie, a counterprotester in her 20s, said her pelvis was broken in six places. Marcus Martin described pushing his then-fiancee out of the Challenger’s path before he was struck.

Susan Bro, Heyer’s mother, sat near the front of the crowded courtroom every day watching the proceedings overseen by Judge Richard E. Moore. Fields’s mother, Samantha Bloom, sat in her wheelchair on the other side, an island in a sea of her son’s victims and their supporters.

[From wary observer to justice warrior: How Heather Heyer’s death gave her mom a voice]

For both prosecutors and Fields’s defense lawyers, the case was always about intent. Defense attorneys Denise Lunsford and John Hill did not deny Fields drove the car that killed Heyer and injured dozens. But they said it was not out of malice, rather out of fear for his own safety and confusion. They said he regretted his actions immediately, and pointed the jury to his repeated professions of sorrow shortly after his arrest and his uncontrollable sobbing when he learned of the injuries and death he had caused.

“He wasn’t angry, he was scared,” Lunsford told the jury in her closing argument.

Early in the trial the defense said there would be testimony from witnesses concerning Fields’s mental health, but those witnesses were never brought forward.

Prosecutors, though, said Fields was enraged when he drove more than 500 miles from his apartment in Ohio to take part in the rally — and later chose to act on that anger by ramming his two-door muscle car into the crowd. They described Fields “idling, watching” in his Challenger on Fourth Street and surveying a diverse and joyous crowd of marchers a block and a half away that was celebrating the cancellation of the planned rally.

They showed video and presented witnesses testifying that there was no one around Fields’s car when he slowly backed it up the street and then raced it forward down the hill into the unsuspecting crowd. In her final address to the jury Thursday, Senior-Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Nina-Alice Antony showed a close-up of Fields in his car to rebut the idea that he was frightened when he acted.

“This is not the face of someone who is scared,” Antony said. “This is the face of anger, of hatred. It’s the face of malice.”

Jurors were shown a now-deleted Instagram post that Fields shared three months before the crash. “You Have the Right to Protest, But I’m Late for Work,” read the post, accompanied by an image of a car running into a group of people.

As he looked down the crowded street Fields saw a chance, Antony told the jury, to “make his Instagram post a reality.”

Jurors also saw a text exchange shortly before the rally in which Fields told his mother he was planning to attend, and she told him to be careful. “We’re not the one who need to be careful,” Fields replied in a misspelled text message on Aug. 11, 2017. He included an attachment: a meme showing Adolf Hitler.

Lunsford dismissed the significance of the Hitler photo and Fields’s Instagram post and asked the jury to ignore how they felt about Field’s political views when deciding whether to convict him.

“You can’t do that based on the fact that he holds extreme right-wing views,” she said.

April Muñiz, 50, was on Fourth Street when Fields drove into the crowd. She escaped physical injury but is still traumatized by witnessing the violent act and seeing so many people she was celebrating with one moment suffer horrific injuries the next. Muñiz attended every day of the proceedings and said the trial helped her “pull the shattered pieces of that day together.”

The guilty verdict for Fields is not the end of his legal troubles. He still faces a federal trial on hate crimes that carries the possibility of the death penalty.

And the guilty verdict does not bring an end to this city’s misery. The legacy of that hate-filled weekend hangs over the city, a cloud that refuses to blow away. The physical and psychic injuries are slow to fade. The trial surfaced painful memories and emotions for many in this small city who were in the streets that day or have friends and acquaintances who were injured.

The city became the focal point for white supremacists when city council members voted to remove statues of Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson from downtown parks. The statues were erected in the 1920s during the Jim Crow era. After the August violence, the council voted to sell both statues, but they remain in place for now under a court injunction. Confederate heritage supporters sued the city, saying that a Virginia law prohibits removal of the statues.

“A lot of people have worked hard for Aug. 12 not to feel like every day of our lives,” said Seth Wispelwey, a local minister who helped form Congregate Charlottesville, a faith-based group formed in advance of a Ku Klux Klan rally and the Unite the Right rally here last summer. “This trial acutely and minutely relived that weekend, so that has been very difficult for many folks.”

Though Fields’s trial has been the most extensively covered, there are more trials and lawsuits to come, including one against Jason Kessler, a city resident and one of the rally’s organizers. And the fate of the two Confederate statues — the original spark for the violence of 2017 — is scheduled to be decided in a court here in January

Paul Duggan contributed to this report.

Washington Post

James Malcolm also painted a Star of David hanging from a gallows on an MSP’s office and knocked over war graves during his campaign of hate.

A vandal scrawled anti-Semitic and neo-Nazi symbols on an MSPs office window.

James Malcom, 18, used red paint to write the symbols, including a Star of David being hung on gallows, at Rona MacKay’s Kirkintolloch office.

He then caused £14,000 of damage to 27 headstones at a cemetery with a Nazi swastika symbol scribbled on broken glass found at one of them.

During his two-month crime spree, Malcolm yelled “Heil Hitler” at a terrified 16-year-old in a park.

He vandalised Lenzie Moss Nature Reserve and Waverly and Luggie Park in Kirkintilloch, East Dunbartonshire, and used his blood to write offensive slogans on the wall of a police cell.

James Malcolm scrawled anti-Semitic and neo-Nazi symbols on an MSPs office window

James Malcolm scrawled anti-Semitic and neo-Nazi symbols on an MSPs office window

Malcolm pled guilty at Glasgow Sheriff Court to four charges of behaving in a threatening or abusive manner, a charge of maliciously damaging headstones and writing offensive slogans on a cell between June 1 and August 9, this year.

The court heard a member of the public spotted graffiti on a glass notice board at Lenzie Moss Nature Reserve on July 17.

He saw “Glory to marches and enemies to the point of no return” in blue paint, along with Nazi slogans and symbols as well as “James M”, scratched on to a sign among the post.

Procurator fiscal depute Mark Allan said the man was “offended and horrified” and took a picture then reported it to the police.

On July 23, Malcolm graffitied in red paint on a bridge above the main path leading to Luggie Park.

Days later a dog-walker saw “Adolf Hitler”, “All N*****s must hang” and “white power” among other phrases.

Mr Allan said: “She was offended and appalled by what she saw, in particular a picture of the Star too David on a hangman’s noose, which reminded her of a personal tragic event.”

She contacted the police who took a note of the full text on the bridge.

The cost of the damage was £500 for the removal of the graffiti.

On July 24, Malcolm was with a group of younger teenagers who ran off when he began to vandalise the window at Miss MacKay’s office with a red paint marker.

Mr Allan said the writing again included anti-Semitic and neo-Nazi symbols.

The following day an employee “felt uncomfortable about the content” of the vandalism and contacted the police.

Investigations lead to Malcolm and officers went to his house to speak to him.

The court heard when they went into his home they saw the walls were covered with anti-Semitic and Nazi slogans including “death to all jews” and “death to all non whites”.

He was taken to London Road police office to be interviewed.

Mr Allan added: “He initially made no comment, however when being asked about the phrases on the bridge he admitted he was responsible and when shown photographs he began to explain the correct phrases, symbols and icons and provided meaning and context.

“He also stated that he was looking to shock people with his messages so that they would wake up and see the truth.

“He didn’t see anything wrong with what he had done however stated that he was getting punished because it was the establishment’s rules.”

Malcolm said he didn’t intend to hurt anybody and only want get his messages out.

When he was held in custody to attend at court, he smeared swastikas and other symbols on the walls of his cell with his own blood.

Having been bailed at court, Malcolm shouted Nazi phrases at a 16-year-old at Waverly Park and threatened him with a Buckfast bottle.

He left the park after he was told by two passers-by that they had contacted the police.

Mr Allan said that on August 9, police were given information that Malcolm had damaged and pushed over grave stones at Old Aisle Cemetery in Kirkintilloch.

The court heard there are 38 graves of Commonwealth service personnel from the first and second World Wars in the graveyard and this is signposted.

When police arrived they saw several headstones had been pushed over and that the damage appeared fresh with the soil newly turned over.

Mr Allan continued: “A total of 27 headstones within different sections of the cemetery had been damaged.

“Some had been pushed over and some had been broken in two. Two of the headstones appeared to have had glass bottles smashed off them.

“At one of the headstones they found a small piece of broken glass with writing which included a Nazi swastika and Germanic runes.

The court was told the damage is £14,000 although that may go up as some headstones will need more work than others.

When he was later arrested Malcolm told police “I know I shouldn’t have done it, I don’t know why.”

Sheriff Alan MacKenzie deferred sentence until a later date and Malcolm was remanded.

Daily Record