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Samantha Turner, 36, has been jailed after she admitted trying to hand over the items

Samantha Turner, 36, has been jailed after she admitted trying to hand over the items when she went to hug prisoner Stephen Benson in the Salford prison

Samantha Turner, 36, has been jailed after she admitted trying to hand over the items when she went to hug prisoner Stephen Benson in the Salford prison

The girlfriend of a prisoner at Forest Bank tried to smuggle in £33,000 worth of cocaine as well as Spice and mobile phones during a prison visit, a court heard.

Samantha Turner, 36, has been jailed after she admitted trying to hand over the items when she went to hug prisoner Stephen Benson in the Salford prison.

They both stood up and hugged each other, but prison staff noticed that Benson put his hands under the coat Turner was wearing as if he was fumbling for something, Manchester Crown Court heard.

Benson then took a black package, a taped up box the size of a child’s shoe box, and stuffed it down his tracksuit trousers.

The package was seized and was found to contain 10.96g of high purity cocaine, which prosecutors said could be worth anything from £16,000 to £33,200 inside prison.

There was also 14.22g of Spice, with a potential value of £1,442 in prison.

Such drugs can be worth anywhere up to 10 times their normal value inside the custodial environment, the court was told.

It also contained two iPhones, four small Xanco mobile phones, nine sim cards as well as phone chargers.

The court heard Turner said she thought the package contained a phone battery, Rizla papers and some tobacco.

Judge Richard Mansell QC said he couldn’t accept this claim, ‘given the size of the package concerned and the common knowledge that drugs and phones are the two most highly prized commodities for prisoners’.

The judge added: “It simply wouldn’t have been worth the risk to smuggle tobacco and a battery into prison and the size and weight of the package you received was clearly inconsistent with your claim.

“In any event, you willingly accepted a package which you were unable to examine and agreed to smuggle it to a prisoner, therefore it is neither defence nor mitigation of the seriousness of your offending.”

Defending, Neil Usher said Turner has had a ‘very difficult life’, and that she was emotionally vulnerable at the time.

She had been in an abusive relationship, and believed ‘she had finally met someone who understood and cared about her’.

Mr Usher said her relationship with Benson was ‘abusive and coercive’, and she began to suffer from poor mental health.

They knew each other when they were teenagers and had recently got back in touch on social media, the court heard.

Mr Usher said Turner, who has since moved to Plymouth and is in a new relationship, was asked by Benson to take in the package during the visit, on December 14, 2017.

He said she had been ‘exploited’.

Judge Mansell sentenced Turner to 18 months in prison.

Sentencing, the judge said: “The message must go out loud and clear from these courts that anyone who smuggles illicit items into prison, especially controlled drugs and phones, should expect to receive an immediate custodial sentence regardless of personal mitigation.”

Turner, of Ocean Street, Plymouth, pleaded guilty to two counts of conveying list A articles into prison, and four counts of conveying list B articles into prison.

Manchester Evening News

From 2019

A 30-year-old man who posted “vile and hateful” posts against Jews, Muslims, black and gay people on a Russian social media site has walked free from court.

Luke Crompton, of Brindle Street, Tyldesley, Wigan, pleaded guilty to encouraging terrorism recklessly by posting hundreds of messages over nine months in 2018 that were “dripping with hate and contempt” on VK – a site similar to Facebook.

Crompton, who was said to have a low IQ and possible autism, was handed a two-year community order at Manchester Crown Court after the judge heard that he did not harbour racist or homophobic views, and had been “influenced and exploited” online by “unscrupulous individuals”.

Alaric Bassano, prosecuting, told the court: “He posted extreme material – photographs, images and words – expressing hatred and contempt for, amongst others, homosexuals, Jews, Muslims and black people and those that consorted with them.”

He continued: “Many of the posts called for and encourage extreme activity against such people, such as the destruction of the Jewish and Islamic faiths, the torching of mosques and the murder of black people, Muslims and Jews.”

Mr Bassano said the VK profiles “prominently” displayed symbols of, and allegiance to, white supremacy.

The prosecutor added that Crompton appears to have harboured or sympathised with white supremacist views, with his Facebook “likes” featuring numerous causes of white supremacy, prolific viewing of material with racist and white supremacist title pages on his mobile phone and a draft text message containing pro-white nationalist and anti-Semitic sentiments.

But he told the court that all the experts who spoke to Crompton agreed that there was an “obsessional quality” to what he was doing and that his limitations, including social isolation and inability to form friendships and relationships, were likely to have played a part in his actions.

David Bentley QC, defending, described the posts as “hateful”, but said Crompton was “someone who is functioning effectively as a 10-year-old”.

He said the defendant was targeted on the Internet by people he believed had a genuine interest in him and was “adamant” he did not hold racist or homophobic views.

The barrister said: “He did not present as harbouring racist and offensive views and, in my opinion, would lack the intellect and sophistication to conceal them.”

He added: “He is plainly a vulnerable individual who was targeted online by unscrupulous individuals.”

Judge Patrick Field QC told Crompton: “What you did was to post vile and hateful material on a Russian social media site over a period of about nine months in 2018.

“The individual posts were deeply offensive, dripping with hate and contempt for Jews, Muslims and black people.

“They included praise for those who believed in white supremacy and they, in part, encouraged terrorism against Jews, Muslims and black people, encouraged people to kill them, to attack their religions and to burn their religious buildings.”

The judge added: “It is plain to me that you were influenced and exploited online by others who were considerably more sophisticated than you are.”

Sentencing Crompton to a two-year community order with a requirement of 30 rehabilitation days, Judge Field said: “I am advised, because of your vulnerability, you are liable to exploitation and radicalisation that might well occur in a prison environment and this would reduce the prospect of rehabilitation and increase the risk you pose to others.”

Crompton, who was wearing a dark-coloured coat and jeans, left the courtroom with his father and mother, who sobbed in the public gallery as the judge told her son he would not be jailed.

Lancashire Telegraph

A convicted football hooligan from Portsmouth launched an unprovoked attack on Guardian columnist and left-wing activist Owen Jones because of his sexuality and political views, a judge has ruled.

James Healy, 40, of Laburnum Grove in Portsmouth

James Healy, 40, of Laburnum Grove in Portsmouth

James Healy, 40, of Laburnum Grove, North End, admitted assaulting Mr Jones outside a pub in August last year, but claimed he ‘had the hump’ because the victim had bumped into him and spilled his drink.

But the Chelsea FC fan – who has a string of convictions for football-related violence – denied being motivated by Mr Jones’s sexuality or political campaigning, claiming he didn’t even know who he was.

Assaults deemed to be hate crimes can attract significantly longer sentences from the courts.

Following his arrest, a search of Healy’s home found a number of items connected to far-right ideology including a collection of pin badges linked to white supremacist groups.

Following a two-day hearing to determine Healy’s motive, Recorder Judge Anne Studd QC ruled on Friday that the unprovoked attack could only be motivated by Mr Jones’s media profile as a left-wing polemicist.

She said Healy had ‘plenty of opportunity to remonstrate’ with Mr Jones in the pub if he had unwittingly spilled his drink, and made no attempt to do so.

Instead he followed him outside and kicked him to the floor from behind.

She said: ‘Mr Jones can be seen (on CCTV) to leave the premises followed by Mr Healy and his co-defendants who can be seen looking across – he doesn’t approach him to remonstrate with him about the spilled beer.

This was a deliberate and targeted attack on Mr Jones personally.’

She continued: ‘I don’t find that this was motivated by a drink spillage – this was a brutal, surprise assault with no warning what so ever. It was clearly targeted.

‘I am satisfied so that I am sure that (Healy) holds particular beliefs that are normally associated with the far right wing.’

She added: ‘I therefore propose to sentence Mr Healy on the basis that this was a wholly unprovoked attack on Mr Jones by reason of his widely published left-wing beliefs by a man who has demonstrable right-wing sympathies.’

Mr Jones suffered cuts and swelling to his back and head, and bruises all down his body in the incident outside the Lexington pub on the Pentonville Road in Islington, north London, on August 17.

Among the incriminating items found at Healy’s home was a photograph of him as a teenager allegedly performing a Nazi salute. Healy also had a football hooligan flag adorned with SS symbols.

One of the items bore the name of the Combat 18 neo-Nazi group, whose stated aims include ‘execute all queers’, the court heard.

A birthday card featuring a St George’s flag, skull and crossbones and the words: ‘You have been nominated and dealt with by the Chelsea Headhunters’, in reference to the notorious hooligan firm, was also recovered.

Healy said the items dated back to his time in the violent Chelsea Youth Firm.

He claimed he had kept them because he is a hoarder, and that he did not know the memorabilia’s connection to the far-right and white supremacist movements.

Asked if he held homophobic or racist views, he replied: ‘No, it’s 2020.’

Healy said that, in the photograph in which he is allegedly performing a Nazi salute, his arm is held out to the right to show off his Chelsea Youth Firm tattoo.

‘I’ve looked up the Nazi salute online, I’ve never seen a picture where their arm is out to the side – it’s always out in front,’ he said.

In her ruling, Judge Studd accepted that it could not be proven Healy was performing a Nazi salute in the picture.

In his evidence, Mr Jones said: ‘I’m an unapologetic socialist, I’m an anti-racist, I’m an anti-fascist and I’ve consistently used my profile to advocate left-wing causes.’

Mr Jones has almost one million Twitter followers, 125,000 followers on Instagram and 350,000 followers on Facebook.

‘Almost every single day I am the subject of an unrelenting campaign (of abuse) by far-right sympathisers,’ he said.

He added: ‘In January last year, I was informed by an anti-fascist organisation I had become one of the main hate figures of online far-right extreme Facebook groups.’

The level of threat prompted the Guardian to hire security team for him.

Mr Jones denied spilling Healy’s drink, insisting: ‘That absolutely did not happen.

‘If I thought I had accidentally spilled someone’s drink, I would apologise profusely, I would say ‘I’m so sorry’ and I would insist – whether they liked it or not – on buying them another drink.’

The defendant pleaded guilty to affray and assault occasioning actual bodily harm at a previous hearing.

Healy’s co-defendants Charlie Ambrose, 30, from Brighton, and Liam Tracey, 34, from Camden, who have previously pleaded guilty to affray over the incident, are due to be sentence on February 11.

Ambrose and Tracey previously both denied a charge of ABH and the charge was left to lie on file, with prosecutors accepting their actions were not motivated by homophobia.

A date for Healy’s sentencing has yet to be set.

Portsmouth News

‘I am moments away from constructing bombs and weapons, how exciting,’ boy wrote in diary

A teenage neo-Nazi who planned terror attacks on synagogues and other targets in Durham has been jailed.

The 17-year-old, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was sentenced to six years and eight months in prison after writing a manifesto aiming to inspire other terrorists.

He detailed plans to firebomb synagogues and other buildings as part of what he believed was an upcoming “race war”.

Before being arrested, he wrote that his upcoming 12 weeks of study leave would be “showtime”.

“I think I am moments away from constructing bombs and weapons, how exciting,” a diary entry added.

The boy was convicted of six terror offences, including preparing acts of terrorism, disseminating terrorist publications and possessing material for terrorist purposes.

When he was arrested in March, police found a piece of paper in his pocket containing a message on code that said: “Killing is probably easier than your paranoid mind thinks. You’re just not used to it … good hunting Friday.”

During his arrest, the boy was carrying a second piece of paper containing a drawing of a fellow school pupil being beheaded.

Prosecutors said he had called for the student’s death, and had described how he wanted to violently attack a second pupil – who he thought was gay – as “judgement exacted on the lowest of the low, as deserved”.

Michelle Nelson QC told Manchester Crown Court: “Assaults upon fellow students, who had no place in the new world order, was in line with that; it was something he saw as part of generating race war and chaos.”

After reading Norway shooter Anders Breivik’s manifesto, which called for lone wolf terror attacks to fight the “genocide” of white people, the teenager started drafting his own.

The document was entitled: “Storm 88: A manual for practical sensible guerrilla warfare against the kike [offensive term for Jewish] system in Durham city area, sieg hiel.”

It listed proposed attack targets in Durham, including schools, public transport and council buildings.

Manifestos have also been written by far-right terrorists who carried out attacks including Halle, El Paso and Christchurch.

Writing on the Fascist Forge forum, the teenager claimed a race war was “inevitable”, and called himself an “accelerationist”.

Prosecutors said they had not identified a “particular act or acts” of terrorism that the boy was going to commit, but that he had been preparing for some kind of atrocity since October 2017.

He denied all offences, claiming he had adopted the terrorist persona for “shock value” and did not want to carry out attacks, but was convicted unanimously of all charges in November.

The teenager wrote that an extremist contact had warned him of an imminent police raid a month before his arrest, prompting him to start deleting files from his devices.

At his first appearance at Westminster Magistrates’ Court last April, prosecutor Kristel Pous said: “Between February 10 to 14, he was tipped off by the Fascist Forge network that the police raid was imminent, and he proceeded to delete all his files.”

Chief Magistrate Emma Arbuthnot said she was “very concerned” and asked police to investigate the claim.

A spokeswoman for Counter Terrorism Policing North East said no further evidence was found, adding: “Although there is evidence he did delete a number of files around 14 February, there’s no actual evidence to support the fact he was tipped off or implicating a third party. All the files deleted at that time were recovered.”

The teenager demonstrated a fascination with mass killers including Breivik, the Oklahoma bomber, Columbine shooters and Unabomber.

The court heard that the boy had been an “adherent of a right-wing ideology” since the age of 13, and that his views became more extreme as he immersed himself in fascist websites and forums.

By 2017, he was describing himself as a neo-Nazi and operated a since-deleted Twitter account.

His racist and homophobic tweets drew the attention of police but when he was interviewed in September that year, he claimed they were posted “for a laugh”.

The boy claimed he was not an extremist, but started another Twitter account and continued communicating with contacts, while accessing a “large quantity of extreme right-wing literature”.

The court heard he had steeped himself in antisemitic conspiracy theories and ranted about Jewish school governors, MPs and the press.

In August 2018, he described himself as a “radical national socialist” and follower of Adolf Hitler, saying he had read Mein Kampf and had a photo of the Nazi leader on his phone.

Prosecutors said the boy obtained and shared terror manuals on making explosives and firearms on the Ironmarch and Fascist Forge online forums, but also drew on jihadi propaganda.

He had searched for Isis execution videos and used al-Qaeda literature, and a jihadi guide on making deadly poisons, including ricin.

By November 2018, he had progressed to extreme occult neo-Nazism, which has gained traction in branches of the UK’s banned National Action terrorist group, and voiced support for satanism.

The teenager declared his support for the “siege” ideology, which was started by an American neo-Nazi and advocates the use of terror attacks to trigger a race war and chaos.

“Democracy is very much a dead system; political violence therefore, can only help us,” he wrote. “The white race is being silently genocided, the west is dying.”

Counterterror police have named right-wing extremism as the fastest-growing terror threat to the UK, although Islamists still make up the largest proportion of investigations.

The largest group of people referred to the Prevent counter-extremism programme are individuals with a “mixed, unstable or unclear ideology”, including obsessions with violence and massacres.

Of the 24 terror plots foiled by security services since March 2017, 16 were Islamist and eight were far right.

The Independent

There were shouts of “democracy is dead” and “shame on you” from Amy Dalla Mura and a packed public gallery when Chief Magistrate Emma Arbuthnot gave her sentencing remarks on Monday.

A Brexiteer who repeatedly harassed Anna Soubry before standing against her in the general election has been jailed for 28 days.

Amy Dalla Mura, 56, targeted Ms Soubry between January and March this year, turning up at events and calling her a “traitor” on live television, Westminster Magistrates’ Court heard.

Former MP Ms Soubry, a Remainer who lost her Broxtowe seat while standing for the Independent Group for Change, said she was left “frightened” following the incidents.

Dalla Mura, of Eton Villas, Hove, claimed that her behaviour was politically motivated and did not accept it was frightening, despite standing in the general election in the same constituency as Ms Soubry.

There were shouts of “democracy is dead” and “shame on you” from Dalla Mura and a packed public gallery when Chief Magistrate Emma Arbuthnot gave her sentencing remarks on Monday.

“Ever since the murder of Jo Cox, MPs no longer feel able to put up with sustained intimidation,” she said.

“You showed an obsession and fixation with Ms Soubry which has led you to bullying and intimidating, and harassing, this now-ex MP for Broxtowe.”

Judge Arbuthnot said the actions “stop ordinary, decent people” becoming MPs.

“This damages our democracy. Because who wants to put up with this sort of harassment?” she added.

Frightening

Ahead of the sentencing, Judge Arbuthnot questioned why Dalla Mura had chosen to stand in Broxtowe, Nottinghamshire, just days after Ms Soubry told the trial she feared for her safety following the defendant’s actions.

“It was hard to see how (Dalla Mura) couldn’t have understood it was frightening,” Judge Arbuthnot said.

“Your client then stood against her in Broxtowe. That was the most serious point, that someone had been fixated not with Brexit but with Ms Soubry.

“Most people go and wave flags and shout. They don’t intimidate people right in their faces.”

She added: “Anyone with any sense would say it’s not a good time. I don’t mind standing in Hove but certainly not in Broxtowe.”

English Democrats

Ms Soubry, who became a target for Brexiteers after quitting the Tory party earlier this year, lost her seat to Conservative candidate Darren Henry after coming third in the general election, receiving some 4,668 votes.

Dalla Mura stood for the English Democrats and received 432 votes.

On January 23, Dalla Mura disrupted an event where Ms Soubry was speaking, repeatedly interrupting her and live streaming the event on Facebook.

Dalla Mura had to be escorted from the premises – the Radisson Blu Edwardian Hotel in central London – before the event could continue.

A second incident involved the 56-year-old branding Ms Soubry a “traitor” as she gave a live television interview to BBC’s Newsnight in Parliament’s Central Lobby, while once again using her mobile phone to video her.

The defendant was asked to stop filming in the premises, as it is not permitted, and left after police officers attended.

A week later, on March 22, Dalla Mura tried to intercept the MP outside the Cabinet Office in Westminster saying she wanted to “have a word”, but did not manage to find her.

London Economic



A man who amassed an arsenal of weapons including explosives, knives and rocket mortars has been jailed for 30 months.

Simon Flint was arrested after a row with youths near Bishop Auckland, County Durham, in June in which he pointed a loaded crossbow at them.

He had earlier admitted affray and possessing a prohibited weapon.

Teesside Crown Court heard the 42-year-old, of Meadowfield Drive, Eaglescliffe, had a fixation with weapons.

After his arrest, police searched a camper van in which he was living and found a “significant collection” of weapons, which also included swords, pepper spray and chemicals that could be used to make improvised explosive devices.

Jolyon Perks, prosecuting, told the court police searched his electronic devices and found videos of him blowing up an apple, a cucumber and a laptop computer.

He told police he thought the effect was “hilarious”, but he understood it may be illegal.

The court heard he told officers he had a fascination with “making things go bang”.

‘Unorthodox interests’

Flint had got into a row with some youths and when a dog walker went to be a peace-maker, the defendant pointed his crossbow at them, Mr Perks said.

Mr Perks said Flint was found to possess a number of stab vests, adding: “I think these acquisitions stem from a skewed sense of his need to defend himself.”

Mark Styles, defending, said: “His unorthodox interests have led to the situation he is now in.

“We have to concede he is certainly eccentric but he is not mentally ill.”

Judge Howard Crowson jailed him for two-and-a-half years, giving Flint credit for his guilty pleas.

Outside court, Gary Fotherill of the Crown Prosecution Service said: “Flint appears to have been motivated by a compulsion to master the technical process of constructing improvised explosive devices and to use these to blow up inanimate objects for his own entertainment.”

BBC News

‘I do apologise, I’m actually a married man with kids, but City fans just rub me up the wrong way’

A ‘married man with kids’ who went on a racist, foul-mouthed rant on the tram on derby day faces Christmas behind bars.

Video footage of Ryan John Healey shouting that Manchester City is a ‘tiny club with a tiny stadium, run by p**i’s with p***i money’ was shared widely on social media at the weekend.

The clip was taken by a passenger on a tram travelling on the Bury Metrolink line at 5.45pm on Saturday (December 7), shortly after the game kicked off at the Etihad Stadium.

In the video, Healey, 29, can be heard shouting ’20 times… 20′ – a reference to how many times Manchester United have won the top-flight title.

He is later heard saying: “I do apologise, I’m actually a married man with kids, but City fans just rub me up the wrong way.

“With their s**t stadium and s**t fans.”

In the footage, passengers can be heard repeatedly asking Healey to be quiet.

One is heard telling him ‘you’re a racist’ and ‘you’re disgusting’.

Healey then appears to say: “Nah, it’s run by p**i money.

“You like blowing up the arena do you? That’s what funds you.”

He later adds: “We’ve got more class in the Stretford End than the entire s*******e you can’t fill.

“You’re a f*****g embarrassment to Manchester. You haven’t even got any points to back it up.

“If this was a Salford tram with United fans, you’d have got f****** leathered by now.

“All the tourists on here can take your shopping bags, take your f******g empty seats and f*** off.”

The game, which kicked off at 5.30pm, ended in a 2-1 win for United.

Healey, of Porchester Drive, Radcliffe, Bury, appeared at Manchester and Salford Magistrates’ Court on Thursday (December 12).

He pleaded guilty to a racially-aggravated public order offence and was sentenced to five weeks in prison and ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £122.

An application was also made for a Criminal Behaviour Order and Football Banning Order. The court will deal with those matters on January 24.

Chief Inspector Matt Bailey-Smith, of GMP’s Transport Unit, said: “We do not tolerate any form of racism or hate crime and will deal with incidents like this accordingly.”

Healey’s arrest was one of a handful by the force’s new, dedicated transport team.

Chf Insp Bailey-Smith added: “One of the aims of the Transport Unit is to improve public confidence and reduce criminality and anti-social behaviour across the transport systems of Greater Manchester.

“These results prove that even within the first month of being established, the unit are already making a huge impact in improving safety and increasing confidence to those who use public transport.

“The unit works in partnership with local authorities and TfGM to ensure an effective and proactive police presence that can provide a response function to deal with ongoing crimes and incidents affecting public transport.

“My officers are there to keep the public safe, so if you are concerned about anyone acting suspiciously or you require help, don’t be afraid of approaching them.”

Manchester Evening News