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Police searching Peter Morgan’s flat also found an IRA volunteers’ handbook on guerilla warfare, a Ku Klux Klan application form and an Al Qaeda terrorism manual.

Police searching Peter Morgan's Edinburgh flat found bomb-making equipment and far-right literature (Image: Police/Daily Record)

Police searching Peter Morgan’s Edinburgh flat found bomb-making equipment and far-right literature (Image: Police/Daily Record)

A right-wing extremist who was caught with a bomb making kit after emergency services rushed to his home answering a 999 call has been jailed.

Police called in to search 35-year-old Peter Morgan’s flat after a woman collapsed found a glass bottle studded with lead shot and nail gun rounds along with explosive powder, fuses, screws and steel tacks.

An Army bomb disposal expert told the High Court in Edinburgh that a “quite effective, viable” improvised explosive device (IED) could have been made from the items discovered.

Sergeant Liam Davies told prosecution lawyer Ashley Edwards QC: “I believe that this is a bomb in construction or waiting to be constructed.”

The experienced explosive ordnance disposal soldier said the complicated weapon could cause “horrific injury” with severe bleeding and potential death without prompt medical intervention.

He said the potential shrapnel glued to the exterior of the vinegar shaker was telling and if the screws and tacks were put in with an explosive mixture placed inside the bottle that would add to the fragmentation effect.

During the search of Morgan’s home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh, officers also found a Nazi swastika flag, far-right literature and a German World War II dagger.

Police also discovered he downloaded an international application form to become a “loyal white knight of the Klu Klux Klan.”

Morgan had also acquired copies of an Al Qaeda terrorism manual, an IRA volunteers’ handbook on guerilla warfare and works on turning guns into fully automatic weapons as well as guides on improvised explosives and interrogation techniques.

Jurors heard he was “quite proud” that he was part of the Scottish Defence League and travelled with others from the far right group to a white pride rally in Manchester in 2015.

 Peter Morgan, pictured at a white pride rally, had an Al Qaeda terrorism manual at his home (Image: Handout)

Peter Morgan, pictured at a white pride rally, had an Al Qaeda terrorism manual at his home (Image: Handout)

He was photographed attending the march with his hood up carrying a Scottish Saltire flag and holding a “white pride worldwide” poster.

The story emerged on Friday after Morgan, a prisoner of HMP Edinburgh, was convicted of charges under the Terrorism Act.

Jurors convicted Morgan of charges which stated he possessed items and collected information which give “rise to a reasonable suspicion” that he was planning “acts of terrorism.”

Morgan’s offending took place between April 2012 and July 2017.

Experts say a 'quite effective' bomb could have been made from the items at Peter Morgan's home

Experts say a ‘quite effective’ bomb could have been made from the items at Peter Morgan’s home

Judge Lord Boyd remanded Morgan – who has convictions dating back two decades – in custody in order for the court to obtain reports about his character.

He said: “I could sentence you today but I prefer to obtain a full report about your background. I will refrain from making comments about the offences to which you have been convicted of.

“In the meantime, you will be remanded in custody.”

Morgan spent the trial denying any wrongdoing.

During proceedings, the jury heard that police and ambulance personnel had originally attended at the block of flats where Taylor lived on July 2 last year because a woman had collapsed and was found to have no pulse.

A resident said she previously saw the woman at Morgan’s flat and police decided to force entry because of concerns for others and a sergeant kicked the door in.

Fireworks and other bomb making equipment was found at Peter Morgan's Edinburgh flat

Fireworks and other bomb making equipment was found at Peter Morgan’s Edinburgh flat

No one was found in the flat at the time but officers noticed drugs paraphernalia such as needles and scales and the premises were secured. Morgan was later seen nearby.

Search officers were dispatched to the property and right-wing flags, leaflets and stickers were found. PC Paul Nicholson, 46, said as they searched drawers, the vinegar bottle, which had lead shot and cartridges glued to its outside, was found.

A large quantity of commercial fireworks were discovered some of which had been taken apart. A dagger bearing the symbol of an eagle mounted on a swastika was found under a sofa in the living room.

DC Murray Cairns, 44, said a decision was taken to seize items found in the flat with the assistance of military ordnance personnel.

A selection of fuses that Peter Morgan could have used to create a bomb

A selection of fuses that Peter Morgan could have used to create a bomb

He said a military expert viewed the items found in the bottom drawer of a chest of drawers and added: “He agreed it was potential component parts of an improvised explosive device.”

Computers taken from Morgan’s flat were analysed and it was found he had a PDF of the Turner Diaries , a novel seen as the bible of the racist right in America.

He was also found to have sent a message saying: “I just hate the f*****g Muslims. Don’t want any more of those f*****s up here.”

Morgan also said Muslims ‘p****d’ him off regardless of them being White, Black or Asian.

A military expert confirmed the items in Peter Morgan's home could make a bomb

A military expert confirmed the items in Peter Morgan’s home could make a bomb

When Morgan, who was on a prescription for the heroin substitute Methodone, was arrested, he said: “How can they get away with charging me for fireworks you can buy out of shops.

“It’s not like a bomb has been made out of them. It’s not like they have injured people.”

However, jurors concluded that Morgan was planning terrorism attacks.

Morgan will be sentenced at the High Court in Edinburgh on August 16, 2018.

Daily Record

A right-wing extremist who was caught with a bomb-making kit during an unrelated call-out to the death of a teenage woman in Edinburgh has been found guilty of terrorism offences.

Peter Morgan’s flat was searched on 5 July 2017 after a woman collapsed.

Police found a glass bottle studded with lead shot and nail gun rounds along with explosive powder, fuses, screws and steel tacks.

Morgan will be sentenced at the High Court in Edinburgh on 16 August 2018.

An Army bomb disposal expert told the High Court in Edinburgh that a “quite effective, viable” improvised explosive device (IED) could have been made from the items discovered.

Sgt Liam Davies told prosecution lawyer Ashley Edwards: “I believe that this is a bomb in construction or waiting to be constructed.”

The experienced explosive ordnance disposal soldier said the complicated weapon could cause “horrific injury” with severe bleeding and potential death without prompt medical intervention.

He said the potential shrapnel glued to the exterior of the vinegar shaker was telling and if the screws and tacks were put in with an explosive mixture placed inside the bottle that would add to the fragmentation effect.

During the search of Morgan’s home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh, officers also found a Nazi swastika flag, far-right literature and a German World War Two dagger.

Police also discovered he downloaded an international application form to become a “loyal white knight of the Klu Klux Klan”.

Morgan had also acquired copies of an Al Qaeda terrorism manual, an IRA volunteers handbook on guerrilla warfare and works on turning guns into fully automatic weapons as well as guides on improvised explosives and interrogation techniques.

Jurors heard he was “quite proud” he was part of the Scottish Defence League and travelled with others from the far-right group to a white pride rally in Manchester in 2015.

Jurors convicted Morgan of charges which stated he possessed items and collected information which give “rise to a reasonable suspicion” that he was planning “acts of terrorism.”

Morgan’s offending took place between April 2012 and July 2017.

Judge Lord Boyd remanded Morgan, who has convictions dating back two decades, in custody in order for the court to obtain reports about Morgan’s character.

Morgan had denied the charges.

During proceedings, the jury heard that police and ambulance personnel had originally attended at the block of flats where Taylor lived on July 2 last year because a woman had collapsed and was found to have no pulse.

A resident said she had previously seen the woman at Morgan’s flat and police decided to force entry because of concerns for others and a sergeant kicked the door in.

The flat was found to be empty but officers noticed drugs paraphernalia such as needles and scales and the premises were secured. Morgan was later seen nearby.

Search officers were dispatched to the property and right wing flags, leaflets and stickers were found.

BBC News

A man found in possession of explosive items and extreme right-wing paraphernalia has been convicted.

At Edinburgh High Court on Friday 13th July Peter Morgan was found guilty of two offences under the Terrorism Act 2000 and one offence under the Explosive Substances Act 1883 after police recovered items linked to the construction of an explosive device from his home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh.

Officers from the Organised Crime and Counter Terrorism Unit carried out a search of the house on 5th July 2017, supported by colleagues from the EOD.

A number of items, which could be used to construct a bomb were seized along with a number of phones and computer equipment.

Following analysis of the computer equipment and phones, it was established that 35-year-old Morgan had been researching racist content and information on constructing explosives.

Nazi flags and stickers and National Front literature was also found within the address.

Morgan was arrested and has been remanded in custody since 5th July 2017.

Detective Inspector Jackie Gilfillan from OCCTU said: “What our investigation established is that Peter Morgan’s interest in explosives, coupled with his extreme right-wing beliefs, made him a danger to not only himself, but the public.

“None of the items recovered from Morgan’s address had been made into any form of viable explosive and we were able to intervene before he could attempt to construct any device capable of doing harm.

“Whenever such individuals come to our attention, a thorough investigation will be undertaken to gather evidence, which we will then act upon to bring them to justice.

“The Action Counters Terrorism Campaign (ACT), recognises the important role the public have to play in preventing terrorism and whenever such individuals come to our attention a thorough investigation is undertaken to gather evidence and bring them to justice.

“While on this occasion, we were able to take action and prevent any danger to the public, any concerns held by members of the public should be reported to the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321.”

A Doncaster football fan banned from watching England for three years after he was filmed singing an anti-Semitic song and making Nazi salutes at the World Cup spent time listening to Nazi songs and calling for ‘right wing violence’ ahead of his trip to Russia.

Leeds United fan David Batty, 58, was handed the football ban after appearing in court in Leeds yesterday and was dubbed ‘disgraceful’ by a judge after being filmed shouting ‘sieg hiel’ and singing a song about Auschwitz with other England fans in a Russian bar.

David Batty will not be allowed to attend England football matches for three years. Credit: PA

David Batty will not be allowed to attend England football matches for three years. Credit: PA

Now it has emerged that Batty spent time listening to Nazi anthems, urged ‘right wing violence’ and described Germany as “mein fatherland” ahead of his trip to Volvograd for England’s 2-1 win over Tunisia. In a series of posts on Facebook with links to far right wing songs, Batty wrote: “So p***** off, gonna thrash the night with these tunes, could do with a bit of right wing violence – sieg.”

He then posted a series of clips to songs linked to the Nazis including Horst-Wessel-Lied, the anthem of the Nazi Party and which is banned in Germany and Lore Lore, a German Wehrmacht marching song, popular with soldiers. He also shared a YouTube link to the current German national anthem Deutschland Uber Alles with the comment ‘mein Fatherland’ as well as a song called Hitler by German industrial metal band Rammstein.

German actress and singer Marlene Dietrich, who defected to the US during World War Two and helped rescue Jews, was described as a “sl*g” while another post read: “F*** em. Sieg heil. White power and all that.” And in replying to a British National Party post about a student ‘storming’ into a university talk and disrupting a speech by Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg he wrote: “They can have their view point but no one else is allowed one, left wing commie tossers. Put them in the showers and wash them lol.”

Batty was one of two men handed banning orders after a video showing England fans singing an anti-Semitic song at the World Cup was shared online. The behaviour of Batty and fellow fan Michael Burns in a bar in the Russian city of Volgograd was described as “disgraceful” by district judge Charlotte Holland who added: “I have seen the activity that you were involved in and seen the still images from what you did. “You know that at this time people are getting behind the national team, including children, and your actions are ruining that.”

The city of Volgograd, which was the venue for England’s 2-1 win over Tunisia, was formerly known as Stalingrad – the site of one of the bloodiest battles in history when Soviet soldiers repelled Hitler’s army during the Second World War. The pair both accepted the banning notice, which was served under the 1989 Football Spectators Act, when they appeared at Leeds Magistrates’ Court and it means they will not be able to be within a two-mile radius of any England football matches until 2021.

The court heard how the pair both had tickets for upcoming matches at the tournament but the judge said their non-attendance of these fixtures was an “unfortunate consequence of their actions”. The fans were recorded singing to the tune of an old Tottenham Hotspur song called Ossie’s Dream, which had the lyrics, ‘We’re on our way to Wembley’, changing them to, ‘We’re on the way to Auschwitz’.

Batty must not go within two miles of the stadium in which any future games are being played for four hours before and after the game and must report to a police station on the day of the games and must also surrender travel documents.

Yorkshire Post

Michael Burns is one of two men had a three-year football ban. Credit: PA

Michael Burns is one of two men had a three-year football ban. Credit: PA

Two men have been handed three-year football banning orders after a video appeared to show England fans singing an anti-Semitic song at the World Cup.

The behaviour of David Batty and Michael Burns in a bar in the Russian city of Volgograd was described as “disgraceful” by a district judge.

The city of Volgograd, which was the venue for England’s 2-1 win over Tunisia, was formerly known as Stalingrad – the site of one of the bloodiest battles in history when Soviet soldiers repelled Hitler’s army during the Second World War.

Leeds Magistrates’ Court heard how the pair both had tickets for upcoming matches at the 2018 World Cup, but were ordered to return home.

The pair both accepted the banning notice, which was served under the 1989 Football Spectators Act, when they appeared in court on Tuesday.

David Batty will not be allowed to attend England football matches for three years. Credit: PA

David Batty will not be allowed to attend England football matches for three years. Credit: PA

Batty, 58, of Doncaster, and 52-year-old Burns, from Billingham in Cleveland, both looked emotionless as they were told that they would not be able to be within a two-mile radius of any England football matches until 2021.

She added: “I have seen the activity that you were involved in and seen the still images from what you did.

“You know that at this time people are getting behind the national team, including children, and your actions are ruining that.”

Malcolm Christy, prosecuting, told the court how the pair had been involved in “inappropriate singing” and that a three-year ban would be the most suitable punishment.

A third man, 57-year-old Michael Herbert, was handed a five-year banning order at Leicester Magistrates’ Court on Saturday, the NPCC said.

Last Wednesday, a spokesman for the FA said of the footage: “We strongly condemn the actions of the people in this video.

“The disgraceful conduct of the individuals in this video does not represent the values of the majority of English football fans supporting the team in Russia.”

Another man, Paul Johnson, 25, of Banbury, Oxfordshire, was given a three-year football banning order at Oxford Magistrates’ Court on Saturday following a separate incident on a train near Moscow on June 16, the NPCC said.

ITV News

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

An alleged member of the banned neo-Nazi group National Action has admitted to plotting to kill a British MP and making threats to kill a police officer.

Jack Renshaw, 23, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius machete to kill the West Lancashire Labour MP Rosie Cooper last summer.

On the opening day of his trial at the Old Bailey on Tuesday, Renshaw pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism and making threats to kill a police officer, DC Victoria Henderson.

The judge, Mr Justice Robert Jay, directed the jury to deliver a formal guilty verdict on the two charges. Renshaw also faces a third charge of membership of the banned far right group, which he denies.

He is on trial alongside Christopher Lythgoe, 32, from Warrington, who is charged with encouraging Renshaw to murder Cooper on behalf of National Action, believing the act would be committed. He denies the charges.

Four other men – Garron Helm, 24, of Seaforth, Merseyside; Matthew Hankinson, 24, of Newton-le-Willows, Merseyside; Andrew Clark, 33, and Michael Trubini, 35, both of Warrington – are also charged with membership of National Action. They deny the charge.

The court heard that Renshaw had bought the machete to kill Cooper between 5 June and 3 July last year. He made threats while in a pub in Warrington on 1 July last year, it was alleged.

Duncan Atkinson, prosecuting, told the court that National Action had engaged since 2013 in a campaign of “virulently racist, antisemitic and homophobic propaganda through which it sought to stir up a violent ‘race war’ against ethnic minorities and others it perceived as ‘race traitors’.”

He said the group “actively sought to recruit and radicalise young people through the violent imagery and hate-filled language of its social media messages, its provocative street demonstrations and intimidation of local communities”.

It was such activities, culminating it its support of the murder of the Labour MP Jo Cox in June 2016, that led to its proscription by the home secretary in December 2016.

The court heard how a significant amount of evidence came from a former member of National Action called Robbie Mullen. Mullen, the prosecution said, told how the group, under the leadership of Lythgoe, continued to function post-proscription, with the primary desire to start a race war and to free “white Britain”.

Other sources of evidence included material found at the defendants’ addresses and on their electronic devices, including communications with each other. All of the defendants are alleged to be part of the north-west area groups, which met at a pub in Warrington called the Friar Penketh.

The prosecution said Renshaw planned to engage in politically motivated murder, and sought the approval of the organisation and hoped to advance its cause through this killing. His motivation was also personal, the court heard.

Renshaw was arrested on 11 January 2017 on suspicion of stirring up racial hatred. He was interviewed by an officer called DC Victoria Henderson and a male police officer, before being released pending further investigation.

On Renshaw’s arrest, a phone was recovered and analysed, revealing what police considered to be evidence of child sex offences (grooming), the court heard. Renshaw was again arrested and interviewed in respect of those allegations on 19 May 2017, again by a team including Henderson.

On 1 July 2017, the prosecution said there was a meeting at the Friar Penketh pub attended by most of the defendants. Mullen was also there.

At this meeting, Renshaw told the group he was planning to kill his local member of parliament, Cooper. “She was of the same party, Labour, as Jo Cox MP had been: she was therefore perceived to have the same support for immigration to this country that has been advanced as a reason for Jo Cox’s death, and more especially for National Action’s support for the actions of her murderer,” Atkinson said.

During the meeting Renshaw said that after killing Cooper he would take some people hostage and would demand that DC Henderson attended the scene. “His plan then would be to kill the officer who was, he said, his real target,” Atkinson said.

Renshaw said he had already purchased the machete that he would use to carry out the killing. The weapon, marketed online as offering “19 inches of unprecedented piercing and slashing power at a bargain price”, was later found by police hidden in an airing cupboard.

Renshaw’s internet search history also related to wounding and his identified target, Cooper.

The court heard how nothing of significance would happen without Lythgoe’s approval, and that was why Renshaw brought up the plan. Lythgoe’s alleged response was to give his consent by saying “don’t fuck it up”. He also advised Renshaw to take precautions to ensure his media devices were not linked to other members in the group, the court heard.

Atkinson, prosecuting, said: “The politically and racially motivated killing of an MP would be an act of terrorism, and Renshaw is charged with preparing to carry out just an act.”

Mullen, believing that Renshaw was serious and there was a real and imminent threat to life, reported what had been said to his contacts at Hope Not Hate, after which Cooper was warned of the threat and a police investigation was launched.

National Action was the first extreme rightwing group to be proscribed since the second world war, and the 85th group to be proscribed in the UK overall.
The Guardian

Jack Renshaw, 23, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius Machete to kill Rosie Cooper last summer

Jack Renshaw has admitted plotting to kill the MP

Jack Renshaw has admitted plotting to kill the MP

An alleged National Action member has admitted plotting to murder an MP.

Jack Renshaw, 23, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius Machete to kill Rosie Cooper last summer.

On the opening day of his trial, Renshaw pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism as well as making a threat to kill police officer Victoria Henderson.

Judge Mr Justice Jay directed the jury to deliver a formal guilty verdict on the first two charges Renshaw faces.

He is on trial alongside Christopher Lythgoe, 32, from Warrington, who denies giving Renshaw permission to murder the West Lancashire MP on behalf of National Action on July 1 last year.

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

The pair, along with Garron Helm, 24, of Seaforth, Merseyside, Matthew Hankinson, 24, of Newton-le-Willows, Merseyside, Andrew Clarke, 33, and Michal Trubini, 35, both of Warrington, also deny membership of the banned far right group.

The case continues in court.

 Court sketch of the accused sat in the Old Bailey (Image: Julia Quenzler / SWNS.com)

Court sketch of the accused sat in the Old Bailey (Image: Julia Quenzler / SWNS.com)

Daily Mirror