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POMPEY football thugs who terrorised Portsmouth city centre ahead of a Plymouth game were shown no mercy by a judge who threw eight hooligans behind bars for a total of nearly 10 years.

The gang of 16 defendants, who appeared at Portsmouth Crown Court throughout the week, were clinging to the hope they may be spared jail for their violent disorder before the League Two clash in April last year.

Stills from body-worn police cameras during violence before the Pompey-Plymouth game in 2017. 'Eight men have now been jailed.

Stills from body-worn police cameras during violence before the Pompey-Plymouth game in 2017. ‘Eight men have now been jailed.

But those hopes were crushed for half of them as one by one they were sent down.

Despite lengthy running battles against police in Guildhall Square and clashes with Plymouth fans, including where one was repeatedly booted like a football, things could have been far worse.

Sentencing the group, Judge Timothy Mousley said: ‘It is a matter of luck there were no serious injuries especially to the man on the floor getting kicked.’

Robbie Fowler, 22, of April Square, Landport, was handed the longest jail term out of the hooligans after he was given two years behind bars and a six year football banning order.

Judge Mousley told Fowler, who was serving a four year banning order at the time, he was the ‘most prominent among the group’ with him seen ‘limbering up’ to fight. Chief among his offences in amongst the constant violent disorder were him kicking out at a police dog and trying to get a policeman to fight him.

Matthew Allinson, 33, of Frogmore Lane, Waterlooville was given 18 months jail and a six year football banning order.

Richard Hampshire, 26, of Tudor Crescent, was given 14 months custody and a six year football banning order.

Ryan Keating, 19, of Oxenwood Green, Havant, was given 13 months in a young offenders institute and a six year football banning order.

Anthony Hopkins, 22, of Langley Road, Buckland, was given 12 months prison and a six year football banning order.

Tommy Russell, 20, of Appleshaw Green, Havant, received 12 months at a young offenders institute and a six year banning order.

Harley Hawkins, 19, of Whitecliffe Avenue, Copnor, was handed the same sentence.

Sean Mitchell, 46, of Chaucer Drive, Chichester, was handed 14 months prison and a six year football banning order.

Simon Hore, 33, of Medina Road, Cosham, was given 13 months prison suspended for 18 months, 250 hours unpaid work, compensation of £250 to Pompey and a four year football banning order.

Louis Glasspool received the same sentence but was given 10 months at a young offenders institute suspended for 18 months.

Harry Jarvie, 21, of Manor Road, Buckland also received the same but was given 12 months jail suspended for 18 months.

Connor Bowen, 19, of Lower Farlington Road, Farlington, was handed eight months in a detention centre suspended for 18 months, was given 250 hours unpaid work, 20 rehabilitation days, told to pay Pompey £250 and given a four year football banning order.

Tommy Houlden, 19, of Hayling Avenue, Copnor, was given the same as Bowen but was given 15 months at a detention centre suspended for 18 months and 15 rehabilitation days.

Asa Palmer, 23, of Sea View Road, Drayton, got nine months jail suspended for 18 months, 250 hours unpaid work, 20 rehabilitation days, told to pay compensation of £250 and a four year football banning order.

Jack Stobart, 23, of April Square, Landport, was given 12 months jail suspended for 18 months, 250 hours unpaid work, a four year football banning order and told to pay Pompey £250.

Shane Bartram, 26, of Goodwood Road, Southsea, got 12 months prison suspended for 18 months, as well as 250 hours unpaid work, told to pay £250 compensation and a four year banning order.
Portsmouth News

A man has been jailed after violence flared during a march and counter demonstration in Sunderland.

Police made three arrests on Saturday afternoon following disorder in the city centre.

The Wearside-based Justice for the Women and Children Group, which campaigns against sexual violence and assault, organised a march through the city centre, which was joined by members of the Democratic Football Lads Alliance (DFLA).

March organiser Tasha Allan defended the group’s involvement in the protest: “The football lads are not racist, they have proved that,” she said.

“Just because somebody has said somebody is racist does not mean they are.”

The two groups marched down Fawcett Street before turning up up High Street West to make their way to the former Crowtree Leisure Centre site for a rally addressed by speakers including UKIP leader Gerard Batten.

Previous Justice for Women and Children Group protests have passed off without incident but trouble erupted on Saturday when the march reached Keel Square, where a counter demo organised by Sunderland Unites and Stand Up To Racism North East was taking place.

Some protesters defied the efforts of march stewards and tried to break through police lines which separated the two groups.

Two of the three men who were arrested were charged with assaulting a police officer.

Lee Graham Parkinson, 36, of no fixed abode, appeared before South Tyneside Magistrates Court this morning and pleaded guilty to the charge.

He was jailed for 12 weeks, with a further 12 weeks to run consecutively imposed for breach of a suspended sentence.

Fifty-eight-year-old Thomas Allen, of Hartside Road, Sunderland, who was also charged with assaulting a police officer, will appear before South Tyneside Magistrates on Monday, October 15.

A third man, aged 24, has been served with a fixed penalty notice for disorderly behaviour.

Sunderland Echo

A DAD and son were beaten unconscious on the way home from a day out at Sunderland Airshow.

Thomas and David Surtees had been on a trip with relatives, including the family’s 86-year-old great-grandfather and a new baby, to watch the seafront displays when they were attacked without reason.

Newcastle Crown Court heard Thomas Surtees’ face and head were kicked and stamped on, leaving him with a serious nose injury which required surgery and may never be fully fixed.

His son David was punched and kicked and left covered in cuts and bruises.

Prosecutor Christopher Rose told the court the attackers had initially shouted abuse at the family before the violence started last July.

He said: “David recalls being kicked from behind. He was knocked to the ground and while on the floor he was kicked and punched until he lost consciousness. His father Thomas tried to intervene and he himself was attacked.

“He was either kicked or stamped to the face, and suffered a significant injury to his nose which involved the internal dorsal collapsing.”

Thomas Allen
, of Wylam Grove, Hendon, admitted causing grievous bodily harm and assault.

The court heard he had Mr Surtees Snr’s blood on his shoes when he was arrested.

The 25-year-old also admitted causing grievous bodily harm to a woman, whose arm was broken when a brick was thrown at her, after violence flared in Borough Road after the Tyne-Wear derby in January.

Judge Roger Thorn sentenced him to a total of 32 months.

Stuart Halliday, 24, of Redwood Court, Sunderland, admitted affray on the basis he was with the group which carried out the attack on the Surtees family, but did not throw any punches or kicks.

He was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment, suspended for two years, with probation supervision and programme requirements.

Judge Thorn said: “This was violence involving a group attack on a family unit, including a father and son, and more particularly a grandfather who was 86 and a young baby.

“There were women in that group. People are entitled to enjoy themselves and expect to have fun without any violence or apprehension of violence.

“This was the most disgraceful attack.”

Defence barristers said both men plan to stay out of trouble in future.

Sunderland Echo

From 2011

Michael McDougall.

Michael McDougall.

A killer who murdered a takeaway boss has been found guilty of perverting the course of justice after claiming to be a gunman responsible for a nightclub shooting.

Michael McDougall, 50, previously of Hylton Avenue, Marsden, South Shields and now an inmate of HMP Wakefield, has been found guilty of the charge following a trial at the Old Bailey in London.

The offence relates to a drive-by shooting outside Tup Tup Palace in Newcastle, on June 6, 2015.

A 24-year-old doorman was shot in the arm when a gunman on a motorbike opened fire using a sawn-off shotgun.

McDougall was jailed for a life sentence of 34 years in April 2016 after he was found guilty of shooting Sunderland dad-of-two Tipu Sultan.

The 32-year-old businessman had run the Herbs & Spice Kitchen takeaway in Lake Avenue, Marsden, South Shields, with his family.

McDougall was also found guilty of two charges of possessing a firearm with intent to endanger life following a trial at Newcastle Crown Court.

His co-accused Michael Mullen, 24, of Hawthorne Avenue, Cleadon Park, South Shields, who had taken McDougall to and from the murder scene on the back of a motorbike, was cleared of murder but found guilty of manslaughter.

He was jailed for 12 years.

Just weeks after he was jailed McDougall launched an appeal against his conviction, which was denied by a judge.

Today, McDougall was found guilty of perverting the justice over a false statement made in 2017 as part of the inquiry into the Tup Tup incident.

The court heard the convicted murderer told “a pack of lies” by trying to claim he was the gunman, jurors heard.

He was jointly charged and stood trial alongside John Henry Sayers, 54, of Fossway, Walker, Newcastle, and Michael Dixon, 50, of no fixed address, who were accused of conspiracy to murder and conspiracy to possess a firearm.

Sayers, a well-known hard man, has been cleared of ordering the ride-by shooting of a bouncer because his son had been thrown out of a nightclub, but has been told he still faces a prison term for perverting the course of justice.

The court heard doorman Matthew McCauley was lucky to survive the shooting, which also left two other members of staff injured.

Sayers was accused of ordering Dixon to carry out the shooting after his son was ejected from the club weeks before.

An Old Bailey jury deliberated for more than 30 hours to find Sayers and Dixon, both from Walker in Newcastle, not guilty of conspiracy to murder.

The pair gave audible sighs of relief in the dock as they were cleared of the offence.

Sayers was also acquitted of conspiring to possess a shotgun with intent to endanger life, while Dixon was found guilty by a majority of 11 to one.

Judge Mark Lucraft QC told serving prisoner Dixon he would take into account that he had already been convicted of another offence committed around the same time.

A fourth defendant – Russell Sturman, 26, from Gosforth, Newcastle – hugged his co-accused in the dock after being cleared of assisting an offender.

Before the trial started, there had been an unsuccessful application by the prosecution to try the case without a jury and it was held well away from Sayers’ home turf in the North East.

Sayers had already been cleared of ordering another murder – the doorstep shooting of a man in 2000 – and subsequently cleared of nobbling the Leeds jury in that case.

However, he is a convicted armed robber and tax-evader and said to be a name to be feared on Tyneside.

Sayers’ son had been thrown out of the trendy Tup Tup Palace and was punched by a doorman weeks earlier.

Prosecutor Simon Denison QC said Sayers had “acquired and promoted a reputation”, and he wouldn’t allow his name to be “disrespected”.

Sayers’ reputation “as a man to be feared” meant “doors are opened for his family”, he added.

“Of course, that only lasts as long as the reputation is believed to be justified – which means that if his family is disrespected, violence has to follow.”

The family was given free entry to clubs without having to queue and free access to VIP areas “just to avoid serious trouble”.

The convicted defendants were remanded into custody to be sentenced at the Old Bailey on Friday, September 21.

A Northumbria Police spokesman said: “This case was thoroughly investigated by a team of dedicated detectives.

“The evidence was subjected to careful scrutiny before a decision was taken to charge and it was only right that this evidence was put in front of a jury.

“We respect the decision the jury has made.”

Sunderland Echo

Michael McDougall was convicted of murder in 2016 and details of that murder can be found here

A MAN has been told to keep his bulldog muzzled after it attacked a spaniel in the Coppergate Centre.

Sam Rogers, prosecuting, said David Tysall and his wife were out shopping with their cocker spaniel Larry when they saw a white and brown dog run up to it, leap on to its back, pin it to the ground and grip the back of its neck.

A group of people, including the attacking dog’s owner, ran up and pulled it off.

Mr Tysall told the owner: “Your dog tried to kill mine.”

Ms Rogers told York magistrates when Mr Tysall said he would phone the police the owner “became quite aggressive towards him, appearing to be drunk. It made the situation worse.”

Andrew John Waterson, of Hardisty Mews, off Leeman Road, York, admitted not keeping his dog under proper control, theft of alcohol, theft of £7.95 of food from the Spar store in Lowther Street on April 8, and obstructing police.

Ms Rogers said in separate incidents on the same day, Waterson had stolen alcohol from the Spar store on Heslington Road and struggled when police arrested him at 9.50pm on Walmgate for aggressive behaviour.

Waterson was ordered to do 12 months’ supervision, including work on controlling his drinking, 100 hours’ unpaid work, to pay £7.95 compensation to the Spar shop in Lowther Street, and to pay £85 prosecution costs. In addition to the muzzle order he was ordered to keep his dog on a lead within the city’s Bar Walls.

His solicitor, Martin Hawes, said Waterson’s dog Tofu had been on a lead in Coppergate Centre on April 27, but it had snapped when it pulled on it.

Tofu was an “Irish breed bull dog”, not a pit bull terrier, and was very good with people. However, it didn’t get on with other dogs. It had not gone for the front of the spaniel’s neck. He had since bought a muzzle for the dog.

Waterson had depression and drank to cope with emotional family issues he was facing. He had a damaged right arm and the police had caused pain when they grabbed it to arrest him.

York Press

Freddie Farnie, 25, and Karl Laslett, 24, were arrested for separate incidents

Two men have been convicted of being drunk and disorderly in Tunbridge Wells after England’s World Cup quarter-final win over Sweden.

Freddie Farnie, 25, and Karl Laslett, 24, were arrested for separate incidents in the town centre on July 7.

Both men were unrepresented when they appeared before Sevenoaks Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday (July 24).

Fruit farm worker Farnie, of Holmewood Road in High Brooms, pleaded guilty to being drunk and disorderly in a public place, as well as causing criminal damage to a property valued under £5,000.

Prosecution

Prosecuting, Debbie Jones, said: “On 7th July at 5pm, officers were deployed in Tunbridge Wells town centre to deal with any public order incidents, as there was World Cup football on.”

Officers were stationed outside the Opera House, when 10 people walked out.

Ms. Jones continued: “One was the defendant and he was standing in the road. He was asked to move and said ‘I can do what I f****** want, it’s a free country.'”

‘You can’t touch me’

Farnie reportedly also approached an officer and said: “You can’t touch me, that’s f****** assault,” before being pulled away by friends when police asked him to move.

Ms Jones continued: “He stood in the road shouting at another officer. The officer approached with the intention of arresting him but he ran off.”

A short while later, Farnie had made his way to The Barn on Mount Pleasant Road, where he was abusive to members of staff before being spotted hot-footing it back up the hill in the direction of the Trinity Theatre, the court heard.

The arrest

Ms Jones added: “Police made their way to York Road and detained the defendant and arrested him for being drunk and disorderly.”

While in his cell at Tonbridge police station in the early hours of July 8, the court heard how Farnie spat on the wall and at the CCTV camera, as well as tearing up the reading material and flushing it down the toilet.

Regarding his behaviour that evening, Farnie said: “It was a one off on that day because of the football. I used to have a few problems a few years ago but I’ve grown up a bit. It was just a bad day.”

Conditional discharge

Sentencing, magistrate Abigail Brennan said: “We are going to make a conditional discharge for 12 months. If you commit any offence, however, I will stress, any offence, then you will be brought back to court and not only with that offence but this will be put back again.

“You are required to pay £80 for a deep clean [of the cell], together with a victim surcharge of £20, plus £85 costs.”

Laslett

Also on that Saturday afternoon, Laslett, a labourer, who lives on Grange Road, was outside The Rose and Crown pub on Grosvenor Road.

Police attended the pub after they became aware of an altercation involving a group of males in the street.

Prosecuting, Debbie Jones said: “[Members of staff] went outside and informed police that [Laslett] had been refused service and been asked to leave.

“He said he was upset about being asked to leave, as he was banned from everywhere else in town.”

She added: “He went to the opera house [Wetherspoon’s] and caused further problems.

“At that point, the officers made the decision to arrest him.”

‘I wasn’t that drunk’

Laslett, who pleaded guilty to the charge of being drunk and disorderly, said: “To be fair I wasn’t that drunk because I was only in the cell for four hours.

“If I was that bad don’t you think I would have been in overnight?”

He added: “It was the World Cup on so there was around 1,000 people in town doing as I was and they chose me. That’s my luck isn’t it?”

Sentencing, Magistrate Brennan said: “We’re going to deal with this by way of a fine. The fine will be £160. You must pay costs of £85 and the victim surcharge will be £35.”

Kent Live

A MAN who spray-painted swastikas around the city and set fire to buildings including a school and a church over the course of a month has pleaded guilty to all charges.

Austin Ross, 23, of Romney Close in Newport, pleaded guilty to 15 counts in total at a brief hearing in Cardiff Crown Court today.

The charges relate to a series of swastikas and racially aggravated graffiti and two arson attacks in Newport between May 2 and May 31 this year.

Two swastikas appeared on a wall and post at the University of South Wales building in Newport city centre during the late May bank holiday weekend.

Alongside one of the swastikas was a message apparently written in support of far right activist Tommy Robinson, real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, who co-founded the English Defence League.

Today, Ross admitted nine counts of causing racially aggravated damage to property.

He owned up to damaging the windows of the Riverfront Theatre in the city centre on May 3, the front door of the Bethel Baptist Church in Bassaleg and a school sign belonging to Maindee Primary School on May 4, as well as a footbridge belonging to Newport City Council on May 5.

Ross also targeted Maindee Primary school a second time on May 28, the Gwent Probation Service building on Lower Dock Street between May 27 and May 31, the University of South Wales Newport campus and the walls of the Masonic Hall on May 28.

Four other counts of racially aggravated harassment, alarm or distress were admitted by Ross between May 2 and May 5.

The charges read out in court noted his actions were based on the membership or perceived membership of a particular racial group.

He also admitted two counts of arson, setting fire to the front doors and hallway of the Masonic Hall in Lower Dock Street on May 28 and destroying a classroom at Bassaleg secondary school on May 29.

Judge Eleri Rees, addressing Ross’ legal representative Harry Baker, warned that the defendant was “not helping himself” by refusing to cooperate, and added she would order a psychiatric assessment before sentencing.

“A more sinister interpretation can be put on his behaviour because he has not explained his actions,” said Judge Rees.

“It does make it difficult for anybody to second guess that there might be a background that could help explain this.

“He doesn’t help himself in that way.

“I’m going to order a psychiatric assessment and we will set up a time table for sentencing.”

Addressing the defendant, Judge Rees added: “I would encourage you to try to cooperate and reflect upon what could be of assistance to you.”

Ross will now appear in court on August 21 for sentencing.

South Wales Argus.