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A 16-YEAR-OLD Bradford boy has been warned that all sentencing options remain open after he was found guilty of making a potential bomb filled with shrapnel.

A jury was told by prosecutors how the teenager, who cannot be named, had researched bomb-making extensively and constructed a device that, with the addition of gunpowder and a fuse, could have been a “viable CO2 bomb” of the type used “to cause maximum harm and death to civilians”.

He will be sentenced at Leeds Crown Court next month after he was convicted on Thursday of one count of making an explosive substance and three counts of possession of a document likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism.

A jury of four women and eight men found the boy guilty of the offences after three days of deliberation but cleared him of the more serious offence of making an explosive substance with intent.

Judge Geoffrey Marson QC told the teenager: “I’m going to adjourn sentence for the preparation of reports and you’ll be brought back to court for sentence some time in the week beginning June 10.

“All sentencing options remain open.”

The jury was told that the teenager told fellow pupils he was going to “go on a rampage” and “kill many people” just weeks after making the device.

He had also told students a year previously that he was going to carry out a school shooting and had praised Adolf Hitler, Leeds Crown Court heard.

Prosecutors said the boy developed an interest in extremist far-right ideology and his searches on the internet became “progressively dark”, accessing videos and information about murder, torture and mutilation.

Paul Greaney QC, prosecuting, said: “He actually constructed a device that, with the simple addition of gunpowder, such as might have been obtained from fireworks, and a basic fuse would have been a viable CO2 bomb.

“Furthermore, he had loaded that device with shrapnel, such as is commonly used by bomb-makers to cause maximum harm and death to civilians.”

The boy first came to the attention of police aged 13 and was referred to Prevent, the Government’s counter-terrorism strategy, just a year later in 2017, the court heard.

In July 2018, Prevent received information that the boy had told fellow pupils he was going to go on a rampage, aiming to kill many people and then be shot by the police or kill himself, and this led to a search of his home in Bradford, where items were found including two carbon dioxide canisters joined together and an assortment of nails, tacks and panel pins.

The court heard that he searched for and watched videos about the English Defence League, attacks on Muslims, the Columbine High School massacre and murder and mutilation.

Giving evidence in his defence, the boy told the jury that he made extreme comments because he was showing off and “being stupid”.

He said that the device found in his bedroom was a fake bomb he had made to show off to his friends.

The teenager, who stood in the dock with three security guards and wearing a suit, showed no emotion when the jury foreman returned the verdicts and as he was taken down to the cells.

Telegraph & Argus

Jack Coulson will be sentenced on Thursday after admitting possessing a document for terrorist purposes

Jack Coulson will be sentenced on Thursday after admitting possessing a document for terrorist purposes


A teenager with a previous conviction for making a pipe bomb in his Nazi memorabilia-filled bedroom has admitted a terror offence.

Jack Coulson was previously convicted of constructing an explosive device and given a youth rehabilitation order.

At Leeds Crown Court, the 19-year-old admitted possessing a document for terrorist purposes.

Coulson, of Mexborough, South Yorkshire, was remanded in custody and is due to be sentenced on Thursday.

Coulson admitted possessing The Big Book Of Mischief between 3 and 20 January.

Photo issued by North East CTU of Nazi memorabilia in the bedroom of teenager Jack Coulson

Photo issued by North East CTU of Nazi memorabilia in the bedroom of teenager Jack Coulson

The court was told the document contained information of a kind likely to be useful to a person looking to commit an act of terrorism.

During his previous trial, Coulson, who lived in Bradford and was 17 at the time, was not named after he was granted anonymity due to his age.

Coulson, who praised the killer of MP Jo Cox, was arrested after he put a photo of the pipe bomb online.

He was also associated with the “secretive neo-Nazi” organisation National Action, which is now a proscribed terror group, the court was told.

In the trial early last year, Coulson was found guilty of making explosives but acquitted of the preparation of terrorist acts.

Jack Coulson at a previous National Action demonstration (front row second from right)

Jack Coulson at a previous National Action demonstration (front row second from right)

The teenager told the court he had never intended to use the pipe bomb, and was given a three-year youth rehabilitation order.

The pipe bomb was found in a drawer in his bedroom after police were alerted through suspicious messages on Snapchat

The teenager told the court he had never intended to use the pipe bomb, and was given a three-year youth rehabilitation order.  The pipe bomb was found in a drawer in his bedroom after police were alerted through suspicious messages on Snapchat

The teenager told the court he had never intended to use the pipe bomb, and was given a three-year youth rehabilitation order.
The pipe bomb was found in a drawer in his bedroom after police were alerted through suspicious messages on Snapchat

One of the messages was a cartoon-like image of a mosque being blown up along with the words: “It’s time to enact retribution upon the Muslim filth.”

The trial also heard the defendant’s “perverted” views led to him celebrating the murder of Labour MP Jo Cox and proclaiming her murderer, Thomas Mair, as a hero.

BBC News

Photo issued by North East CTU of Nazi memorabilia in the bedroom of teenager Jack Coulson

Photo issued by North East CTU of Nazi memorabilia in the bedroom of teenager Jack Coulson

A teenager who already has a conviction for making a pipe bomb which was found in his Nazi memorabilia-filled bedroom has admitted a terror offence.

Jack Coulson, 19, was found guilty last year of constructing the explosive device but avoided jail when he was given a youth rehabilitation order.

On Monday, in a separate prosecution, Coulson admitted an offence of possessing a document or record for terrorist purposes when he appeared at Leeds Crown Court.

Judge Geoffrey Marson QC heard Coulson, of Mexborough, South Yorkshire, admit that between between January 3 and January 20 this year, he possessed a document called The Big Book Of Mischief.

The court heard the document contained information of a kind likely to be useful to a person looking to commit an act of terrorism.

Coulson, who appeared in court wearing black trousers and an open-necked, short-sleeved, pale blue shirt, was remanded in custody by Judge Marson.

He will be sentenced on Thursday.

Coulson was not named in reports of his previous trial, in early 2017, after the court banned his identification because he was 17 years old at the time.

That jury heard how the pipe bomb was found in a desk drawer in his Bradford bedroom after police were alerted through suspicious Snapchat messages.

Prosecutors said one of these messages was a cartoon-like image of a mosque being blown along with words describing ‘retribution’.

Another was a picture of a pipe bomb with an image of the Bradford skyline and the message: “Incendiary explosive and home-made black powder.

The jury heard how officers found the defendant’s bedroom covered in flags, including the swastika and the symbol of the Waffen SS as well as a laptop with wallpaper featuring a Nazi eagle over a swastika and the German phrase: One Nation, One Empire, One Leader.

But the teenager told the court he never intended to use the pipe bomb.

The judge in the trial, Mr Justice Goss, said that the defendant’s “perverted” views led to him celebrating the murder of Labour MP Jo Cox and proclaiming her murderer, Thomas Mair, as a hero.

Sentencing Coulson in February 2017, the judge said: “You are quite unable to articulate why you are now sorry and you continue to express very extreme views.”

He said Coulson was associated with National Action, which is now a proscribed terror group and was described in court as “a small, secretive neo-Nazi British youth nationalist organisation”.

Coulson was found guilty by the jury of constructing the explosive device but not guilty of a terrorism offence.

He was given a youth rehabilitation order to last for three years which would involve him being supervised, attending a preventative intervention programme for a year, staying off the internet and not contacting any proscribed groups.

Yorkshire Post.

Jack Coulson on a National Action demo in York, summer 2016.

Jack Coulson on a National Action demo in York, summer 2016.

A teenager who already has a conviction for making a pipe bomb which was found in his Nazi memorabilia-filled bedroom has admitted a terror offence.

Photo issued by North East CTU of Nazi memorabilia in the bedroom of teenager Jack Coulson

Photo issued by North East CTU of Nazi memorabilia in the bedroom of teenager Jack Coulson

Jack Coulson, 19, was found guilty last year of constructing the explosive device but avoided jail when he was given a youth rehabilitation order.

On Monday, in a separate prosecution, Coulson admitted an offence of possessing a document or record for terrorist purposes when he appeared at Leeds Crown Court.

Judge Geoffrey Marson QC heard Coulson, formerly of Bradford but now of Mexborough, South Yorkshire, admit that between between January 3 and January 20 this year, he possessed a document called The Big Book Of Mischief.

The court heard the document contained information of a kind likely to be useful to a person looking to commit an act of terrorism.

Coulson, who appeared in court wearing black trousers and an open-necked, short-sleeved, pale blue shirt, was remanded in custody by Judge Marson.

He will be sentenced on Thursday.

Coulson was not named in reports of his previous trial, in early 2017, after the court banned his identification because he was 17 years old at the time.

That jury heard how the pipe bomb was found in a desk drawer in his Bradford bedroom after police were alerted through suspicious Snapchat messages.

Prosecutors said one of these messages was a cartoon-like image of a mosque being blown up along with the words: “It’s time to enact retribution upon the Muslim filth.”

Another was a picture of a pipe bomb with an image of the Bradford skyline and the message: “Incendiary explosive and home-made black powder.

“More to come.”

The jury heard how officers found the defendant’s bedroom covered in flags, including the swastika and the symbol of the Waffen SS as well as a laptop with wallpaper featuring a Nazi eagle over a swastika and the German phrase: One Nation, One Empire, One Leader.

But the teenager told the court he never intended to use the pipe bomb.

The judge in the trial, Mr Justice Goss, said that the defendant’s “perverted” views led to him celebrating the murder of Labour MP Jo Cox and proclaiming her murderer, Thomas Mair, as a hero.

Sentencing Coulson in February 2017, the judge said: “You are quite unable to articulate why you are now sorry and you continue to express very extreme views.”

He said Coulson was associated with National Action, which is now a proscribed terror group and was described in court as “a small, secretive neo-Nazi British youth nationalist organisation”.

Coulson was found guilty by the jury of constructing the explosive device but not guilty of a terrorism offence.

He was given a youth rehabilitation order to last for three years which would involve him being supervised, attending a preventative intervention programme for a year, staying off the internet and not contacting any proscribed groups.

Telegraph & Argus

A man has been jailed for having explosives, weapons and ammunition following a joint investigation by police in Hertfordshire and Counter Terrorism officers from the Met and the Eastern Region Special Operations Unit (ERSOU).

Warren Snedden, 45 (05.05.73) of Longcroft Lane, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire was sentenced at Woolwich Crown Court on Friday, 15 June to a total of 10 years’ imprisonment and to serve an additional five years’ on extended licence.

Snedden was previously found guilty on Tuesday, 27 March of having an explosive substance. He also previously pleaded guilty to a number of other offences including: possession of documents containing information likely to be useful for terrorist purposes; possession of firearms and ammunition; and, production of cannabis.

Police were alerted to a suspicious transaction on an online auction site in July 2017, where a number of chemicals associated with the production of the explosive TATP were purchased. Further enquiries linked the purchases to Snedden.

A search warrant was carried out on 29 September 2017 by Hertfordshire Constabulary at his address in Welwyn Garden City, where officers found the chemicals in Snedden’s bedroom, along with a number of tilt switches that are often used in the production of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

Police also found component parts of a firearm, an air rifle and over 200 rounds of ammunition – all items Snedden was specifically prohibited from possessing, having previously been convicted of an armed robbery offence in 2001. A small number of cannabis plants were also found growing in his garden.

Snedden’s digital devices were seized and later examined. Detectives found copies of terrorist-related manuals and documents detailing how to make and create home-made ammunition, weapons and explosives.

Snedden was charged and remanded in custody; he appeared at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 2 October 2017, and his case was subsequently referred on to Woolwich Crown Court for trial.

Commander Clarke Jarrett, Head of the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command, said: “Snedden never gave a full explanation as to what he was planning to do with the array of chemicals, weaponry and ammunition he had stockpiled. What is clear is that what he was doing was putting both himself, his neighbours and the public in great danger.

“This was a joint investigation between the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command and colleagues from Hertfordshire Constabulary, as well officers from ERSOU’s counter terrorism policing unit. The excellent work across all three has led to a number of dangerous components and weapons being taken out of circulation.

“The case is also a further reminder of the need to be ever-vigilant and I would urge anyone who sees any suspicious activity or behaviour to ACT and report it to police.”

Any suspicious behaviour or activity can be reported via this online tool or by calling the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321.

Detective Superintendent Rob Bartlett, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing for ERSOU, said: “Although we may never understand why Snedden stockpiled these items and was viewing such material, there is no doubt that he posed a very real threat to society.

“This case was a great example of agencies working together in order to prevent someone from causing harm, and removing dangerous weapons and chemicals from circulation.

“The Action Counters Terrorism campaign urges people to be vigilant to suspicious activity such as the ordering of illegal firearms or the gathering of chemical materials so this is a timely reminder for people to be alert and report anything they find concerning.”

Snedden was convicted of the following offences:

Two counts of having an explosive substance; two counts of possession of a prohibited weapon; two counts of possession of a firearm without a certificate; possession of ammunition without a certificate; possession of ammunition when prohibited; possession of a firearm by a person previously convicted of crime; three counts of possession of a document containing information useful for terrorist purposes; production of cannabis.

Met Police

A 25-year-old man from Banff convicted of planning terrorism attacks on mosques has been jailed for life.

A judge told Connor Ward he must serve at least six years before he is eligible for parole.

His trial heard he acquired components for potential bombs and kept a list of Scottish mosque addresses.

Ward had denied breaching the Terrorism Act but was charged with conduct which showed his intention to commit acts of terrorism.

Police who searched his home found hundreds of ball bearings, which could be used in pipe bombs, and rocket tubes capable of firing projectiles.

‘Catastrophic results’

At the High Court in Glasgow, judge Lord Burns told him: “The jury found you guilty and must have been satisfied you were in the course of preparing acts of terrorism.

“The jury’s view was that you formed an intention to attack a mosque or mosques in Aberdeen and would have acted alone.

“You had reached the stage of identifying your targets and expressed threats against Muslims.”

Lord Burns said that if Ward had carried out the acts of terrorism “it would have had catastrophic results.”

‘Serious public risk’

The judge added: “You had reached the stage of buying materials and you planned to cause serious injury at the least.

“Your obsession with weapons and explosives and your extreme right-wing attitudes presents serious risk to the public.”

Ward showed no emotion as he was led away to begin his sentence.

The trial had been held at the High Court in Edinburgh.

He was previously jailed for three years in 2012 after admitting explosives charges in connection with an incident which saw people evacuated from their homes.

BBC News

A Scots ‘neo-Nazi’ who gathered components to make bombs and kept a list of Scottish mosque addresses has been jailed for life.

Connor Ward, from Banff in Aberdeenshire, acquired hundreds of ball bearings which could be used in pipe bombs and rocket tubes which could be used to fire projectiles.

He also had a stun gun, hundreds of knuckle dusters, knives and metal bars.

The 25-year-old was sentenced to life in prison for breaching the Terrorism Act 2000 and the Terrorism Act 2006. It will be six years before he is eligible for parole.

Ward acquired a mobile phone signal jamming device and a machine for picking up hidden bugs.

He also downloaded tens of thousands of documents on guns and survival techniques. The files also contained extreme right-wing propaganda and military tactics.

Detectives also found a Google Maps-style file containing the postal addresses of five Islamic places of worship in the Aberdeen area on Ward’s computer.

They also found that Ward, who told jurors that he thought Hitler had made mistakes, had started to compose a book called “Combat 18 British Mosque Address Book”.

Lord Burns told him: “The jury found you guilty and must have been satisfied you were in the course of preparing acts of terrorism.

“The jury’s view was that you formed an intention to attack a Mosque or Mosques in Aberdeen and would have acted alone. You had reached the stage of identifying your targets and expressed threats against Muslims.”

Lord Burns said that if Ward had carried out the acts of terrorism “It would have had catastrophic results”.

The judge added: “You had reached the stage of buying materials and you planned to cause serious injury at the least. Your obsession with weapons and explosives and your extreme right-wing attitudes presents serious risk to the public.”

Combat 18 is the name of an extreme British right-wing paramilitary group.

Ward had previously been jailed for three years at the High Court in Edinburgh on another explosives charge.

He was also given a 22-month jail sentence in April 2015 for possessing a stun gun.

Ward was convicted in July 2016 of having an “improvised” knife whilst serving that prison sentence and given another 18 months.

In August 2016, the court heard how Ward was sentenced to another four months in custody for assaulting somebody whilst in custody.

STV