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A man has been jailed for having explosives, weapons and ammunition following a joint investigation by police in Hertfordshire and Counter Terrorism officers from the Met and the Eastern Region Special Operations Unit (ERSOU).

Warren Snedden, 45 (05.05.73) of Longcroft Lane, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire was sentenced at Woolwich Crown Court on Friday, 15 June to a total of 10 years’ imprisonment and to serve an additional five years’ on extended licence.

Snedden was previously found guilty on Tuesday, 27 March of having an explosive substance. He also previously pleaded guilty to a number of other offences including: possession of documents containing information likely to be useful for terrorist purposes; possession of firearms and ammunition; and, production of cannabis.

Police were alerted to a suspicious transaction on an online auction site in July 2017, where a number of chemicals associated with the production of the explosive TATP were purchased. Further enquiries linked the purchases to Snedden.

A search warrant was carried out on 29 September 2017 by Hertfordshire Constabulary at his address in Welwyn Garden City, where officers found the chemicals in Snedden’s bedroom, along with a number of tilt switches that are often used in the production of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

Police also found component parts of a firearm, an air rifle and over 200 rounds of ammunition – all items Snedden was specifically prohibited from possessing, having previously been convicted of an armed robbery offence in 2001. A small number of cannabis plants were also found growing in his garden.

Snedden’s digital devices were seized and later examined. Detectives found copies of terrorist-related manuals and documents detailing how to make and create home-made ammunition, weapons and explosives.

Snedden was charged and remanded in custody; he appeared at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 2 October 2017, and his case was subsequently referred on to Woolwich Crown Court for trial.

Commander Clarke Jarrett, Head of the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command, said: “Snedden never gave a full explanation as to what he was planning to do with the array of chemicals, weaponry and ammunition he had stockpiled. What is clear is that what he was doing was putting both himself, his neighbours and the public in great danger.

“This was a joint investigation between the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command and colleagues from Hertfordshire Constabulary, as well officers from ERSOU’s counter terrorism policing unit. The excellent work across all three has led to a number of dangerous components and weapons being taken out of circulation.

“The case is also a further reminder of the need to be ever-vigilant and I would urge anyone who sees any suspicious activity or behaviour to ACT and report it to police.”

Any suspicious behaviour or activity can be reported via this online tool or by calling the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321.

Detective Superintendent Rob Bartlett, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing for ERSOU, said: “Although we may never understand why Snedden stockpiled these items and was viewing such material, there is no doubt that he posed a very real threat to society.

“This case was a great example of agencies working together in order to prevent someone from causing harm, and removing dangerous weapons and chemicals from circulation.

“The Action Counters Terrorism campaign urges people to be vigilant to suspicious activity such as the ordering of illegal firearms or the gathering of chemical materials so this is a timely reminder for people to be alert and report anything they find concerning.”

Snedden was convicted of the following offences:

Two counts of having an explosive substance; two counts of possession of a prohibited weapon; two counts of possession of a firearm without a certificate; possession of ammunition without a certificate; possession of ammunition when prohibited; possession of a firearm by a person previously convicted of crime; three counts of possession of a document containing information useful for terrorist purposes; production of cannabis.

Met Police

A 25-year-old man from Banff convicted of planning terrorism attacks on mosques has been jailed for life.

A judge told Connor Ward he must serve at least six years before he is eligible for parole.

His trial heard he acquired components for potential bombs and kept a list of Scottish mosque addresses.

Ward had denied breaching the Terrorism Act but was charged with conduct which showed his intention to commit acts of terrorism.

Police who searched his home found hundreds of ball bearings, which could be used in pipe bombs, and rocket tubes capable of firing projectiles.

‘Catastrophic results’

At the High Court in Glasgow, judge Lord Burns told him: “The jury found you guilty and must have been satisfied you were in the course of preparing acts of terrorism.

“The jury’s view was that you formed an intention to attack a mosque or mosques in Aberdeen and would have acted alone.

“You had reached the stage of identifying your targets and expressed threats against Muslims.”

Lord Burns said that if Ward had carried out the acts of terrorism “it would have had catastrophic results.”

‘Serious public risk’

The judge added: “You had reached the stage of buying materials and you planned to cause serious injury at the least.

“Your obsession with weapons and explosives and your extreme right-wing attitudes presents serious risk to the public.”

Ward showed no emotion as he was led away to begin his sentence.

The trial had been held at the High Court in Edinburgh.

He was previously jailed for three years in 2012 after admitting explosives charges in connection with an incident which saw people evacuated from their homes.

BBC News

A Scots ‘neo-Nazi’ who gathered components to make bombs and kept a list of Scottish mosque addresses has been jailed for life.

Connor Ward, from Banff in Aberdeenshire, acquired hundreds of ball bearings which could be used in pipe bombs and rocket tubes which could be used to fire projectiles.

He also had a stun gun, hundreds of knuckle dusters, knives and metal bars.

The 25-year-old was sentenced to life in prison for breaching the Terrorism Act 2000 and the Terrorism Act 2006. It will be six years before he is eligible for parole.

Ward acquired a mobile phone signal jamming device and a machine for picking up hidden bugs.

He also downloaded tens of thousands of documents on guns and survival techniques. The files also contained extreme right-wing propaganda and military tactics.

Detectives also found a Google Maps-style file containing the postal addresses of five Islamic places of worship in the Aberdeen area on Ward’s computer.

They also found that Ward, who told jurors that he thought Hitler had made mistakes, had started to compose a book called “Combat 18 British Mosque Address Book”.

Lord Burns told him: “The jury found you guilty and must have been satisfied you were in the course of preparing acts of terrorism.

“The jury’s view was that you formed an intention to attack a Mosque or Mosques in Aberdeen and would have acted alone. You had reached the stage of identifying your targets and expressed threats against Muslims.”

Lord Burns said that if Ward had carried out the acts of terrorism “It would have had catastrophic results”.

The judge added: “You had reached the stage of buying materials and you planned to cause serious injury at the least. Your obsession with weapons and explosives and your extreme right-wing attitudes presents serious risk to the public.”

Combat 18 is the name of an extreme British right-wing paramilitary group.

Ward had previously been jailed for three years at the High Court in Edinburgh on another explosives charge.

He was also given a 22-month jail sentence in April 2015 for possessing a stun gun.

Ward was convicted in July 2016 of having an “improvised” knife whilst serving that prison sentence and given another 18 months.

In August 2016, the court heard how Ward was sentenced to another four months in custody for assaulting somebody whilst in custody.

STV

Combat 18 and Adolf Hitler disciple Connor Ward was captured with a stun gun, knuckle dusters, knives, metal bars, ball bearings and rocket tubes.

Neo-Nazi Connor Ward was caught with knuckle dusters, knives, metal bars, ball bearings and rocket tubes

Neo-Nazi Connor Ward was caught with knuckle dusters, knives, metal bars, ball bearings and rocket tubes

A neo-Nazi who acquired components for potential bombs and kept a list of Scottish mosque addresses is behind bars after being convicted of planning terror attacks.

Connor Ward, 25, acquired hundreds of ball bearings which could be used in pipe bombs and rocket tubes which could be used to fire projectiles.

The High Court in Edinburgh heard how the fascist acquired an arms cache which included a stun gun, hundreds of knuckle dusters, knives and metal bars.

Ward, who was previously jailed for three years in 2012 for possessing an explosive substance, also acquired a number of deactivated bullets.

The court heard the ammo could have been reactivated for use in a firearm.

Horrified police discovered the lethal horde after receiving a tip off that Ward had broke strict firearms legislation by buying a stun gun from abroad.

Detectives who searched Ward’s home in Banff, Aberdeenshire, also found he had acquired a mobile phone signal jamming device and a machine for picking up hidden bugs.

And they also discovered that Ward had downloaded tens of thousands of documents from the internet on firearms and survival techniques.

The files also contained extreme right-wing propaganda and documents about military tactics.

Detectives also found a Google Maps-style file containing the postal addresses of five Islamic places of worship in the Aberdeen area on Ward’s computer.

They also found that Ward, who told jurors he thought Hitler had made mistakes, had started to compose a book called “Combat 18 British Mosque Address Book.”

The court heard that Combat 18 is the name of an extreme British right-wing paramilitary group

The court heard how in the title page of the book, the accused had written a dedication which read: “This book is dedicated to all that follow Mohammed and the Islamic faith.”

“You will all soon suffer your demise.”

This prompted the police to fear that Ward was set to launch terrorism attacks.

Ward, a former psychiatric patient, claimed he was suffering from mental illness at the time he downloaded the documents.

He said that he acquired the files because he believed the world was going to end in 2012 and he wanted to survive the apocalypse.

But jurors refused to believe Ward’s claims and returned guilty verdicts on two charges of breaching the Terrorism Act 2000 and the Terrorism Act 2006.

Their verdicts came on the fifth week of proceedings against him.

The first charge which Ward was convicted of stated that between February 26, 2011, and November 21, 2014, he did “with the intention of committing acts of terrorism, engage in conduct in preparation of said acts”.

The second charge stated that on the same date, Ward did “collect or make a record of information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism.”

The secretive neo-Nazi had a bug detection device in case he was being spied upon

The secretive neo-Nazi had a bug detection device in case he was being spied upon

Prosecution lawyer Richard Goddard told the court that Ward had been previously jailed at the High Court in Edinburgh on another explosives charge.

He said: “He was convicted at the High Court in Edinburgh on October 30, 2012, on a charge of contravening the 1883 explosives act.

The neo-Nazi had obtained a mobile phone signal jammer

The neo-Nazi had obtained a mobile phone signal jammer

“He collected the chemical constituents of a bomb. His motivation then was to harm his father.”

Mr Goddard also told the court that Ward was given a 22 month jail sentence in April 2015 for possessing a stun gun.

He was also convicted in July 2016 of having an “improvised” knife whilst serving that prison sentence and given another 18 months.

In August 2016, the court heard how Ward was sentenced to another four months for assaulting somebody whilst in custody.

Mr Goddard said the Crown wanted to submit a serious organised crime prevention order.

This would limit the ability of Ward to reoffend following his release from prison.

Lord Burns adjourned sentence on Ward for the court to obtain reports on his character.

He said: “In light of the verdict of the jury and your previous convictions, I am going to call for a report on the risk you pose to members of the public.”

Ward first came to public attention after he was jailed for three years in December 2012. He had pleaded guilty to making threats and possessing an explosive substance in suspicious circumstances.

The High Court in Edinburgh heard that Ward told police that he bore a grudge against his father, who had a child with his previous ex girlfriend.

Ward said “voices in his head” were telling him to kill his dad.

When detectives raided his house, they found chemicals together with items for making bombs.

Nearby houses had to be evacuated.

Passing sentence, judge Lord Uist said: “It is clear that you harbour a deep hatred for your father as you told the police that it was your intention to kill him and also yourself by means of a bomb.”

When Ward was released from that jail term, police continued to monitor him. And in November 2014, officers raided Ward’s property after receiving a tip off that he had purchased a stun gun from abroad.

Upon arriving at the property, detectives found the stun gun, which was disguised as a torch, hundreds of knuckledusters and knives.

Cops searching Ward’s mum’s house in Banff also found dozens of weapons.

PC Richard Roach, 34, was one of the officers who searched Ward’s property.

He told the court that material including deactivated bullets, rocket tubes and 500 steel ball bearings were found there.

When Mr Goddard asked PC Roach about the significance of the ball bearings, the officer replied: “Items like this can be used in pipe bombs – that’s why it was seized.”

Computer expert James Borwick was asked by detectives to search a USB stick and a laptop belonging to Ward.

Police then became alarmed at the discovery of files on the computer.

The white supremacist had a medieval-type flail as part of his cache of weapons

The white supremacist had a medieval-type flail as part of his cache of weapons

Detectives formed the conclusion that Ward was planning to commit terrorist attacks as a so called “lone wolf”.

Mr Borwick found a Google Maps-style document detailing the locations of five mosques in Aberdeen.

The computer expert also said that some of the Google searches made on Ward’s laptop included phrases like ‘fake police warrant cards,’ ‘How to Make a Flash Grenade’ and ‘How to Make Inert Bullets work’.

Mr Borwick told the court that the computer contained the TOR Internet Browser – which he said gave Ward the ability to surf the dark web and to potentially look at sites which sold guns and explosives.

He also downloaded tens of thousands of documents from the internet detailing military and survival techniques.

Some of the files had titles like ‘AK47 Assault Rifle Operator Manual’ and ‘Dragonov 7.62mm SVD.pdf’.

Other titles downloaded by Ward onto his computer included ‘Techniques of Silent Killing’ and the ‘White Resistance Manual’.

Professor Matthew Feldman, 41, was asked by the police to analyse the content found on Ward’s computer.

The academic, who specialises in studying extreme right-wing political groups, said he found that Ward had a total of 2,043 ‘extreme right wing’ punk rock songs on his computer.

Mr Feldman said he found that Ward had downloaded a 214-page copy of Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler.

Ward also had a copy of book called the Turner Diaries which tells a story about white people who start a war against other races.

The court heard that David Copeland read the book before starting a bombing campaign in London in 1999 and that the FBI consider the novel to be the “bible” of neo-Nazism.

Professor Feldman said he believed that Ward was an “exemplary” neo-Nazi.

Officers feared that with the information, Ward was going to launch an attack – perhaps on mosques close to his home in Aberdeen.

Ward admitted in court that he was a “white supremacist” who was “definitely” anti-Jewish.

He also said that he was also against “Jihadi” Islam.

The FBI consider the Turner Diaries to be the "bible" of neo-Nazism

The FBI consider the Turner Diaries to be the “bible” of neo-Nazism

But he denied suggestions that he was planning a terrorism attack.

Ward claimed that he was suffering from mental illness at the time he downloaded 19,000 documents about firearms and another 22,000 files on ‘survivalist’ techniques.

He told defence advocate Drew McKenzie that he did this because of his poor mental health.

He added: “I believed the world was coming to an end on December 21, 2012.

“I stockpiled weapons. I taught myself survival techniques.”

When Mr McKenzie asked him why he needed to learn these techniques, Ward replied: “If the end of the world was gonna come, I was gonna be a survivor – there would be other people trying to survive as well.

“We’ve all seen films about the apocalypse. Violence is rife. It would be either kill or be killed.”

In cross examination, Mr Goddard pointed out that one of documents found on Ward’s computer was called “Combat 18 British Mosque Address Book”.

The dedication on the book read: “The book is dedicated to all that follow Mohammed and the Islamic faith. You will all soon suffer your demise.”

Mr Goddard said this indicated that Ward wanted to carry out a terrorism act.

Mr Goddard said: “What do you think of Adolf Hitler?”

Ward replied: “I think he made mistakes. He wasn’t right in every aspect.”

But Ward denied he was planning to carry out terrorism attacks.

Speaking about the Combat 18 book, Ward said the title was a “working one”.

He added: “That’s how it sounded in my head. To me at the time that phrase was not a threat in the way you are making it sound.”

In the end, the jurors refused to believe Ward’s story.

Ward is expected to be sentenced at the High Court in Glasgow on April 11.

Daily Record

Connor Ward, 25, gathered bomb components and kept list of Scottish mosques.

An ‘exemplary Neo-Nazi’ gathered components to make bombs and kept a list of Scottish mosque addresses.

Connor Ward, 25, acquired hundreds of ball bearings which could be used in pipe bombs and rocket tubes which could be used to fire projectiles.

The High Court in Edinburgh heard he also had a stun gun, hundreds of knuckle dusters, knives and metal bars.

He was found guilty on Wednesday after a five-week trial of breaching the Terrorism Act 2000 and the Terrorism Act 2006.

Detectives who searched Ward’s home in Banff, Aberdeenshire, found that he had acquired a mobile phone signal jamming device and a machine for picking up hidden bugs.

They also discovered that Ward had downloaded tens of thousands of documents on firearms and survival techniques. The files also contained extreme right-wing propaganda and military tactics.

Detectives also found a Google Maps-style file containing the postal addresses of five Islamic places of worship in the Aberdeen area on Ward’s computer.

They also found that Ward, who told jurors that he thought Hitler had made mistakes, had started to compose a book called “Combat 18 British Mosque Address Book”.

The court heard that Combat 18 is the name of an extreme British right-wing paramilitary group.

Prosecution lawyer Richard Goddard told the court that Ward had been previously jailed for three years at the High Court in Edinburgh on another explosives charge.

Mr Goddard also told the court that Ward was given a 22-month jail sentence in April 2015 for possessing a stun gun.

He was also convicted in July 2016 of having an “improvised” knife whilst serving that prison sentence and given another 18 months.

In August 2016, the court heard how Ward was sentenced to another four months in custody for assaulting somebody whilst in custody.

On Wednesday, he was convicted of two charges of preparing terror attacks.

Ward is expected to be sentenced at the High Court in Glasgow in April.

Police Scotland reaction

Detective Chief Superintendent Gerry Mclean, of Police Scotland’s Organised Crime and Counter Terrorism Unit, said: “Following Ward’s arrest a vast amount of material was seized by officers who invested a significant amount of time into quantifying the scale of Ward’s interest in terrorism.

“Although he operated alone, the weapons, manuals and downloads he possessed had the potential to cause serious harm.

“While we may never know the full extent of Ward’s intentions thanks to the early intervention of police, we do know that we cannot underestimate the dangerous nature of any behaviour or activity linked to terrorism.

“These acts are very rare, not least in the North East of Scotland, and while concerted action takes place every day alongside our partners to protect the public it is crucial that communities remain vigilant.”

STV

A 25-year-old man from Banff has been convicted of planning terrorism attacks.

Connor Ward had denied breaching the Terrorism Act, and faced trial at the High Court in Edinburgh charged with conduct which showed his intention to commit acts of terrorism.

The jury heard he acquired components for potential bombs and kept a list of Scottish mosque addresses.

Sentence was deferred after the verdict following a five-week trial.

Ward, a former psychiatric patient, claimed he was suffering from mental illness at the time he downloaded the documents.

He was previously jailed for three years in 2012 after admitting explosives charges in connection with an incident which saw people evacuated from their homes.

‘Suffer your demise’

Judge Lord Burns adjourned sentence on Ward to the High Court in Glasgow on 11 April to obtain reports on his character.

Ward acquired hundreds of ball bearings which could be used in pipe bombs and rocket tubes which could be used to fire projectiles.

Police discovered that Ward had downloaded tens of thousands of documents from the internet on firearms and survival techniques.

The files also contained extreme right wing propaganda and military tactics.

The court heard Ward had written a dedication in a book which read: “This book is dedicated to all that follow Mohammed and the Islamic faith.

‘Serious harm’

Defence advocate Drew McKenzie told the court that he would reserve his mitigation until the sentencing hearing.

After the case, Det Ch Supt Gerry Mclean, of Police Scotland’s organised crime and counter terrorism unit, said: “Following Ward’s arrest, a vast amount of material was seized by officers who invested a significant amount of time into quantifying the scale of Ward’s interest in terrorism.

“Although he operated alone, the weapons, manuals and downloads he possessed had the potential to cause serious harm.

“While we may never know the full extent of Ward’s intentions, thanks to the early intervention of police we do know that we cannot underestimate the dangerous nature of any behaviour or activity linked to terrorism.”

BBC News

TWO friends obsessed with Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik plotted a far-right hate campaign in Torbay, a court was told today.

John Roddy, 20, and Tobias Ruth, 18, daubed racist graffiti on a mosque and spray painted Brixham police station

bomb

The pair styled themselves as Knights Templar in homage to Breivik and sent letters to Islamic centres telling worshippers to leave the country.

At Exeter Crown Court today Ruth, from Brixham, was sent to a Young Offenders Institution for two years and nine months

He had previously admitted conspiracy to cause criminal damage and to send malicious communications.

Roddy, from Torquay, walked away from court with a suspended jail sentence. He admitted the conspiracy charges and possessing a terror manual on his computer.

Their arrests came in January after an area of Lymington Road in Torquay was sealed off by armed police who feared they may be dealing with a terrorist cell.

Exeter Crown Court was told that police had been hunting whoever was responsible for a series of graffiti attacks on various buildings in Torquay and Brixham dating back to July the previous year.

Red spray paint and the initials KT had been daubed on buildings and 72 incidents of criminal damage were later attributed to the pair.

Among the buildings targeted were Brixham police station; a council-owned building in St Mary’s Park; the Union Street car park in Torquay and a children’s play area in Plainmoor.

Racist slogans were sprayed on the Torquay Islamic Centre.

Police arrested Roddy after a large billboard had been daubed by the words ‘Knights Templar’

Police analysed Facebook traffic between Roddy and Ruth and discovered the pair had been in conversation about places to target.

Roddy’s laptop was found to contain an “al-Qaeda training manual” and Breivik’s ‘2083 A European Declaration of Independence’.

Jeremy Atkinson prosecuting, said: “Both developed an obsession with the personality and ideology of Anders Breivik, the convicted Norwegian terrorist and mass murderer.

“The defendants had attempted to act out to some extent their own form of activity under the banner of Knights Templar, an organisation discussed at some length by Anders Breivik and aspired to be part of that organisation or their own version of it.”

He said in July the pair had taken part in an ‘initiation right’ with each of them branding the other on the upper arm with a hot metal cross to signify their allegiance to the Knights Templar.

Letters sent to the Islamic Centre in Torquay included the words ‘Leave this town today or there will be hell to pay.’

Identical letters, shown to have been addressed by Roddy and using cut out letters from newspapers, were also sent to mosques in Brighton and Plymouth.

Lee Brembridge mitigating for Roddy, now of Old Mill Road,said there was no evidence any of the material found in his possession would be used for terrorist purposes and the material had not been distributed.

He said Roddy was shy and had been assessed by a mental health team. He also had Asperger’s and autism.

Roddy, he said, had come under the influence of Ruth after the pair met on a bricklayer’s course at South Devon College, at which point his family had started to notice a behavioural change.

Kevin Hopper, mitigating for Ruth, said his client was a ‘social inadequate’ who was easily influenced by others. He said Ruth had been 17 at the time and compensation claimed for the graffiti only amounted to £500.

But Judge Francis Gilbert QC said the real cost was far higher and ran into thousands of pounds.

“At least one of the acts of criminal damage was motivated by racial hatred,” he added.

“The racial element of the offences is obvious.”

Roddy was given 23 months in a Young Offenders Institution, suspended for two years and 18 months supervision.

Torquay Herald Express