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A KEYLESS reveller is starting 12 months in jail after he tried to get back into his home using a ladder at 2.40am.

An eye-witness thought Andrew John Waterson was a burglar and summoned police to Skelton Court, Clifton, said prosecutor David Garnet,t at York Crown Court.

The 39-year-old, with 105 previous convictions, reacted so badly to the police presence, it took five officers to bring the kicking, screaming man under control.

“You have pleaded guilty yet again to a series of offences that reflect your complete disregard for any ideas in our society for good behaviour,” Judge Jonathan Durham Hall QC told Waterson.

“There is nothing that can be sensibly done by the defence to stop this court from doing its duty. Some court has to.”

He jailed him for three months, plus nine months previously suspended for benefit fraud.

Waterson pleaded guilty to a public order offence and causing criminal damage to a police cell.

For Waterson, Iftikhar Ahmed said his client did not have his house key with him, but had an arrangement to wake up a neighbour who did have a key when he returned from his night out.

“This is something he has adopted in the past,” said Mr Ahmed. “Unfortunately for him, police were called.

“He tried to explain to the police exactly what he was doing, but he felt that the police officers didn’t want to hear anything from him.”

The court was told Waterson regretted his actions.

He had been out with friends for the first time since his 15-year-old daughter had come to live with him and had got drunk. His parental responsibilities had led to him changing his lifestyle and he had got part-time work.

“I have rarely seen a record so bad,” Judge Durham-Hall said.

“I have rarely seen someone treated with such leniency over the years.”

Waterson’s 105 previous convictions included eight for public order offences and ten for damaging property.

He got the suspended sentence at York Crown Court in November for claiming £11,790 in benefit while doing six jobs at different times over a three-year period.

Benefit fraudster

Andrew Waterson claimed a disability living allowance, income support, housing benefit and council tax benefit on the grounds that he had an injured arm that stopped him working.

But the car valet still managed to do six jobs at different times between May 2002 and 2005, thus netting £11,790 of taxpayers’ money he was not entitled to, York Crown Court heard in November.

Defence barrister David Dixon said Waterson had needed the money to support his family and towards the end of the period had been helping his partner fund her drug habit.

The Recorder of York, Judge Stephen Ashurst decided the five benefit offences Waterson admitted, plus 273 similar offences taken into consideration, merited a nine-month prison sentence.

He suspended the sentence because jailing him could mean Waterson’s teenage daughter would have to go into care and because the Department of Work and Pensions had waited 18 months before prosecuting him.

However, once Waterson admitted another offence committed during the two-year suspension period, another judge could jail him – and did.

York Press

From 2008

‘This was a truly shocking incident’ says DC James Payne

Alex Chivers was jailed for 26 and 12 weeks, to be served concurrently Metropolitan Police

Alex Chivers was jailed for 26 and 12 weeks, to be served concurrently Metropolitan Police

A man who abused two Muslim women before striking one of them in the face with a packet of bacon has been jailed.

Alex Chivers made abusive comments to a Muslim teen, who was walking down a road in Enfield, north London, with her mother on 8 June.

After calling her “Isil scum” and shouting “you deserve this”, he then struck her in the face with an open packet of bacon.

“The victim was not injured, but was very distressed,” Scotland Yard said in a statement.

Chivers, of nearby Waltham Cross, was arrested six days later and changed with one count of racially or religiously aggravated common assault and one count of causing racially or religiously aggravated alarm or distress.

After pleading guilty at Highbury Corner Magistrates’ Court, he was sentenced to 26 weeks’ imprisonment for the assault and 12 weeks’ imprisonment for a public order offence – to run concurrently.

Calling the incident “truly shocking”, DC James Payne from Enfield Community Safety Unit, said other people were present at the time of the assault, “including an associate of Chivers’ who filmed the incident”.

He added that enquiries were ongoing to try to identify them.

London’s Metropolitan Police said that hate crimes of this type remain “largely under reported”, adding that it “stands together with policing partners, colleagues and groups to investigate all hate crime allegations, support victims and their families, and bring perpetrators to justice”.

Police figures released in March, showed a considerable rise in hate-related crime in London over the previous year.

The number of victims of religious and racist hate crime had risen by almost 20 per cent, from 14,004 to 16,618, and victims of faith hate have seen an 18 per cent increase from 1,699 to 2,000.

Homophobic incidents had also increased by 12 per cent, from 1,816 to 2,033, while the number of disability hate victims increased by 216 per cent in the last year alone, up from 251 in 2015/16 to 794 in 2016/17.

In February, it was revealed that the number of hate crimes recorded by regional police forces rose by up to 100 per cent in the months following the Brexit vote.

The Independent

A man from Northampton has been banned from all football games in the UK from being abroad when England play away following public order offence at a Northampton Town game.

Gavin Mobley, 27, of Northampton, pleaded guilty and was convicted at Northampton Magistrates’ Court for committing the offence at the Northampton Town v Peterborough United match on Saturday, November 19 at Sixfields.

He was sentenced at Wellingborough Magistrates’ Court yesterday, Wednesday 21 December, where he received a 12 month Community Order, including 100 hours unpaid work and costs of £85.

Mobley was also handed a three-year Football Banning Order, which will restrict his attendance at football matches in the United Kingdom as well as travel outside of the country when England are playing away.

Northampton Chronicle

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Two men associated with the English Defence League have been jailed following a ‘very serious and frightening’ mass brawl at a Sheffield city centre pub.

The fight at The Howard pub on Howard Street near Sheffield railway station involved members of the EDL and Unite Against Fascism and took place in front of frightened onlookers.

It happened at around 3pm on Saturday, May 10, last year, shortly after demonstrations by both groups in Rotherham had finished.

Mark Johnson, 34, and Derek Hemphill, 47, both from Huddersfield, were jailed for 12 months and one day at Sheffield Crown Court today after previously admitting charges of affray.

They were given six months each for affray, with time added to their jail terms for both separately breaching suspended sentences for past offences.

Johnson was caught on camera punching a member of the UAF a number of times, while Hemphill was seen on video delivering several kicks.

Fellow EDL member Adam Storey, 32, from Brushfield Grove in Frecheville, Sheffield, was given a 12 month community order and will have to carry out 60 hours of unpaid work after also admitting affray. He was also ordered to pay £300 compensation to the pub.

Storey was seen on CCTV delivering stamping kicks towards a man being held by others.

Hayley Ellis, 36, from Leeds, admitted a public order offence after being caught on CCTV kicking a member of the UAF in the back. She was given a 12 month community order, will have to carry out 40 hours of unpaid work and ordered to pay £200 compensation.

Glasses, snooker balls and chairs were all thrown during the wider disorder, with one member of the UAF having a glass smashed over his head.

Around £1,000 of damage was caused to the pub, with fighting spilling out on to the street outside the pub.

Witnesses said it had been a scene of ‘chaos’, with members of the public left fearing for their safety as the two groups clashed.

Sheffield Crown Court heard today that the fight had been sparked by members of the UAF coming into the pub with their faces covered while a small group of the EDL, including Johnson, had been inside drinking.

One member of the UAF, who has not been identified, went up to the group and asked them to leave the pub.

Johnson, who is mixed race, claimed when he started to confront the group, one called him a ‘race traitor’ – resulting in the violence starting.

Other members of the EDL who had been by the station ran up to the pub to get involved in the fighting, which spilled out on to the street.

Ian Goldsack, prosecuting, said tables had been overthrown, with chairs, stools, glasses and pool balls all thrown within the pub.

A window was broken and hundreds of pounds worth of damage caused to walls, ceilings and two chairs.

Mr Goldsack said one witness described seeing a member of the UAF having a glass smashed over his head before being dragged outside and assaulted.

The court heard one member of the UAF called Samuel Ross suffered a gash to his head during the fighting. Ross has previously been given a conditional discharge for attempting to pervert the course of justice in relation to the case after he sent text messages to other members of the UAF asking what he should tell the police about what happened.

Sentencing, Judge Robert Moore said it had been a ‘very serious and frightening disturbance’ in which all four defendants had played a part.

But he added that problems had been caused by the UAF provoking the small number of EDL members inside the pub, resulting in the fighting starting.

Investigating officer Police Constable Chris Wright from Rotherham said: “Today marks the culmination of a lengthy investigation into violent disorder and I am pleased with the result at court today.

“Even though the demonstration in Rotherham concluded peacefully, a group of individuals seemed intent on violent disorder.

“These four endangered the safety of members of the public who were enjoying a drink in a Sheffield pub that day. It is lucky that nobody was seriously injured as a result of their reckless actions.

“I hope this case serves as a warning to those individuals who seek to engage in violent disorder that we will not tolerate this behaviour.”

Sheffield Telegraph

The founder and former leader of the English Defence League Tommy Robinson has been fined £200 by magistrates over public order offences.

He appeared at Hammersmith Magistrates’ Court under his real name of Stephen Yaxley-Lennon on Monday.

Yaxley-Lennon, of Luton, was convicted of incitement and behaviour leading to breakdown of order relating to a march in London on 7 September 2013.

He was also ordered to pay a £20 victim surcharge and £80 court costs.

Yaxley-Lennon was convicted for mortgage fraud in January and jailed for 18 months.

He was released under licence in June but was recalled to prison in October.

A statement on Facebook from his supporters said: “Tommy Robinson has been recalled to prison for responding to a threat on Twitter.

BBC News

Five people were found guilty of a public order offence after a controversial Irish and trade unionist march through Liverpool city centre.

The four men and one woman had all denied the charge when they appeared before District Judge Richard Clancy at Liverpool magistrates’ court.

But after a two-day trial, Mr Clancy found Paul Harrison, 31, of Windbourne Road, Aigburth ; Jason Aspinall, 41, of Cherry Lane, Walton ; Jonathan Halvorsen, 22, of Wentworth Drive, Everton ; and married couple Margaret Anders, 24, and Paul Anders, 26, of Northumberland Street, Toxteth , guilty of the charge.

They were arrested after failing to comply with a notice which required counter-protesters at the James Larkin march last July to assemble in a designated spot away from the route of the parade.

Demonstrators were told at the start of the march that they would be liable for arrest if they protested during the procession, which in previous years had been marred by scenes of public disorder.

All five of the accused were warned by officers on separate occasions during the course of the march, culminating in their arrest as it made its way along Hanover Street and The Strand.

In the case of Harrison, Aspinall, and Halvorsen, they were “chanting and gesticulating” towards the marchers in Hanover Street.

Paul and Margaret Anders, meanwhile, shouted abuse towards the parade as it made its way along The Strand.

The James Larkin march has attracted controversy from some factions who claim it is a front for Irish republicanism.

Mr Clancy said in his summing-up: “Clearly there are some feelings in this matter. You weren’t happy with the situation and you wanted to protest.

“People have the right to protest, but it has to be peaceful. We are dealing with a potential disorder situation.”

After a means assessment was carried out, Harrison and Halvorsen were each fined £100 for the offence, while Aspinall, Margaret and Paul Anders were each fined £75.

They were also ordered to pay prosecution costs.

Chief Superintendent Jon Ward, Area Commander for Liverpool North, said: “Merseyside Police is committed to ensuring that people have the right to conduct legitimate marches in the city without fear of interference, or prejudice.

“In the past marches by some groups have attracted interest from opposition groups intent on causing problems and disrupting peaceful marches through the city through the use of intimidation.

“When the Larkin March took place earlier this year we were determined to ensure that the event would take place without incident and invested significant resources in to policing the march. The force used the Section 14 powers for the first time to prevent any problems and as a result a number of people who refused to adhere to the conditions were arrested and charged.

“The sentencing at court today supports the actions taken by Merseyside Police on the day of the march and hopefully sends out a strong message for similar marches in the future.”

Liverpool Echo

David camp - banned from Cambridge Islamic centres

David camp – banned from Cambridge Islamic centres

A man has been issued an Asbo banning him from going near a number of Islamic premises in Cambridge after he threatened to burn down a mosque.

David Camp, 35, of Thorpe Way, off Ditton Lane, Cambridge, was made subject of an anti-social behaviour order at Cambridge Magistrates’ Court yesterday after he was convicted of several racially aggravated offences..

Camp had previously admitted to posting a large number of offensive anti-Islamic messages on Twitter between April 1 and June 5. He had also admitted to three further public order offences following a drunken outburst in Mill Road on June 30 during which he shouted abuse at members of the public. During that incident Camp threatened to burn down a mosque, he continued to shout abuse at the officers who then arrived and arrested him.

He was sentenced to a 12-month supervision order with alcohol treatment requirement on July 12.

Following an application by police, a two year criminal Asbo was granted, banning Camp from entering parts of Mawson Road, Tenison Road, Devonshire Road, Mill Road or Whitechapel Road, in London. He is also banned from entering St Paul’s Road or Darwin Drive in their entirety, or from going within 50 metres of Omar Farouk Mosque in Kirkwood Road.

Sgt Matt Gadsby said: “We enjoy a rich and diverse mix of cultures and religions in Cambridge and David Camp has caused considerable distress through his behaviour so we are pleased to have secured the order in full.

“This Asbo is fundamentally about promoting public safety and protecting the rights of the community, and will hopefully provide reassurance that we will not tolerate either racism or anti-social behaviour in any form.

“Camp has now been given clearly defined boundaries by the court, and is aware of the penalty should he choose to ignore them. In publicising this matter we are now seeking the support of the community in promoting the effective reporting and enforcement of the order.”

Cambridge News