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Police searching Peter Morgan’s flat also found an IRA volunteers’ handbook on guerilla warfare, a Ku Klux Klan application form and an Al Qaeda terrorism manual.

Police searching Peter Morgan's Edinburgh flat found bomb-making equipment and far-right literature (Image: Police/Daily Record)

Police searching Peter Morgan’s Edinburgh flat found bomb-making equipment and far-right literature (Image: Police/Daily Record)

A right-wing extremist who was caught with a bomb making kit after emergency services rushed to his home answering a 999 call has been jailed.

Police called in to search 35-year-old Peter Morgan’s flat after a woman collapsed found a glass bottle studded with lead shot and nail gun rounds along with explosive powder, fuses, screws and steel tacks.

An Army bomb disposal expert told the High Court in Edinburgh that a “quite effective, viable” improvised explosive device (IED) could have been made from the items discovered.

Sergeant Liam Davies told prosecution lawyer Ashley Edwards QC: “I believe that this is a bomb in construction or waiting to be constructed.”

The experienced explosive ordnance disposal soldier said the complicated weapon could cause “horrific injury” with severe bleeding and potential death without prompt medical intervention.

He said the potential shrapnel glued to the exterior of the vinegar shaker was telling and if the screws and tacks were put in with an explosive mixture placed inside the bottle that would add to the fragmentation effect.

During the search of Morgan’s home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh, officers also found a Nazi swastika flag, far-right literature and a German World War II dagger.

Police also discovered he downloaded an international application form to become a “loyal white knight of the Klu Klux Klan.”

Morgan had also acquired copies of an Al Qaeda terrorism manual, an IRA volunteers’ handbook on guerilla warfare and works on turning guns into fully automatic weapons as well as guides on improvised explosives and interrogation techniques.

Jurors heard he was “quite proud” that he was part of the Scottish Defence League and travelled with others from the far right group to a white pride rally in Manchester in 2015.

 Peter Morgan, pictured at a white pride rally, had an Al Qaeda terrorism manual at his home (Image: Handout)

Peter Morgan, pictured at a white pride rally, had an Al Qaeda terrorism manual at his home (Image: Handout)

He was photographed attending the march with his hood up carrying a Scottish Saltire flag and holding a “white pride worldwide” poster.

The story emerged on Friday after Morgan, a prisoner of HMP Edinburgh, was convicted of charges under the Terrorism Act.

Jurors convicted Morgan of charges which stated he possessed items and collected information which give “rise to a reasonable suspicion” that he was planning “acts of terrorism.”

Morgan’s offending took place between April 2012 and July 2017.

Experts say a 'quite effective' bomb could have been made from the items at Peter Morgan's home

Experts say a ‘quite effective’ bomb could have been made from the items at Peter Morgan’s home

Judge Lord Boyd remanded Morgan – who has convictions dating back two decades – in custody in order for the court to obtain reports about his character.

He said: “I could sentence you today but I prefer to obtain a full report about your background. I will refrain from making comments about the offences to which you have been convicted of.

“In the meantime, you will be remanded in custody.”

Morgan spent the trial denying any wrongdoing.

During proceedings, the jury heard that police and ambulance personnel had originally attended at the block of flats where Taylor lived on July 2 last year because a woman had collapsed and was found to have no pulse.

A resident said she previously saw the woman at Morgan’s flat and police decided to force entry because of concerns for others and a sergeant kicked the door in.

Fireworks and other bomb making equipment was found at Peter Morgan's Edinburgh flat

Fireworks and other bomb making equipment was found at Peter Morgan’s Edinburgh flat

No one was found in the flat at the time but officers noticed drugs paraphernalia such as needles and scales and the premises were secured. Morgan was later seen nearby.

Search officers were dispatched to the property and right-wing flags, leaflets and stickers were found. PC Paul Nicholson, 46, said as they searched drawers, the vinegar bottle, which had lead shot and cartridges glued to its outside, was found.

A large quantity of commercial fireworks were discovered some of which had been taken apart. A dagger bearing the symbol of an eagle mounted on a swastika was found under a sofa in the living room.

DC Murray Cairns, 44, said a decision was taken to seize items found in the flat with the assistance of military ordnance personnel.

A selection of fuses that Peter Morgan could have used to create a bomb

A selection of fuses that Peter Morgan could have used to create a bomb

He said a military expert viewed the items found in the bottom drawer of a chest of drawers and added: “He agreed it was potential component parts of an improvised explosive device.”

Computers taken from Morgan’s flat were analysed and it was found he had a PDF of the Turner Diaries , a novel seen as the bible of the racist right in America.

He was also found to have sent a message saying: “I just hate the f*****g Muslims. Don’t want any more of those f*****s up here.”

Morgan also said Muslims ‘p****d’ him off regardless of them being White, Black or Asian.

A military expert confirmed the items in Peter Morgan's home could make a bomb

A military expert confirmed the items in Peter Morgan’s home could make a bomb

When Morgan, who was on a prescription for the heroin substitute Methodone, was arrested, he said: “How can they get away with charging me for fireworks you can buy out of shops.

“It’s not like a bomb has been made out of them. It’s not like they have injured people.”

However, jurors concluded that Morgan was planning terrorism attacks.

Morgan will be sentenced at the High Court in Edinburgh on August 16, 2018.

Daily Record

A right-wing extremist who was caught with a bomb-making kit during an unrelated call-out to the death of a teenage woman in Edinburgh has been found guilty of terrorism offences.

Peter Morgan’s flat was searched on 5 July 2017 after a woman collapsed.

Police found a glass bottle studded with lead shot and nail gun rounds along with explosive powder, fuses, screws and steel tacks.

Morgan will be sentenced at the High Court in Edinburgh on 16 August 2018.

An Army bomb disposal expert told the High Court in Edinburgh that a “quite effective, viable” improvised explosive device (IED) could have been made from the items discovered.

Sgt Liam Davies told prosecution lawyer Ashley Edwards: “I believe that this is a bomb in construction or waiting to be constructed.”

The experienced explosive ordnance disposal soldier said the complicated weapon could cause “horrific injury” with severe bleeding and potential death without prompt medical intervention.

He said the potential shrapnel glued to the exterior of the vinegar shaker was telling and if the screws and tacks were put in with an explosive mixture placed inside the bottle that would add to the fragmentation effect.

During the search of Morgan’s home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh, officers also found a Nazi swastika flag, far-right literature and a German World War Two dagger.

Police also discovered he downloaded an international application form to become a “loyal white knight of the Klu Klux Klan”.

Morgan had also acquired copies of an Al Qaeda terrorism manual, an IRA volunteers handbook on guerrilla warfare and works on turning guns into fully automatic weapons as well as guides on improvised explosives and interrogation techniques.

Jurors heard he was “quite proud” he was part of the Scottish Defence League and travelled with others from the far-right group to a white pride rally in Manchester in 2015.

Jurors convicted Morgan of charges which stated he possessed items and collected information which give “rise to a reasonable suspicion” that he was planning “acts of terrorism.”

Morgan’s offending took place between April 2012 and July 2017.

Judge Lord Boyd remanded Morgan, who has convictions dating back two decades, in custody in order for the court to obtain reports about Morgan’s character.

Morgan had denied the charges.

During proceedings, the jury heard that police and ambulance personnel had originally attended at the block of flats where Taylor lived on July 2 last year because a woman had collapsed and was found to have no pulse.

A resident said she had previously seen the woman at Morgan’s flat and police decided to force entry because of concerns for others and a sergeant kicked the door in.

The flat was found to be empty but officers noticed drugs paraphernalia such as needles and scales and the premises were secured. Morgan was later seen nearby.

Search officers were dispatched to the property and right wing flags, leaflets and stickers were found.

BBC News

A man found in possession of explosive items and extreme right-wing paraphernalia has been convicted.

At Edinburgh High Court on Friday 13th July Peter Morgan was found guilty of two offences under the Terrorism Act 2000 and one offence under the Explosive Substances Act 1883 after police recovered items linked to the construction of an explosive device from his home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh.

Officers from the Organised Crime and Counter Terrorism Unit carried out a search of the house on 5th July 2017, supported by colleagues from the EOD.

A number of items, which could be used to construct a bomb were seized along with a number of phones and computer equipment.

Following analysis of the computer equipment and phones, it was established that 35-year-old Morgan had been researching racist content and information on constructing explosives.

Nazi flags and stickers and National Front literature was also found within the address.

Morgan was arrested and has been remanded in custody since 5th July 2017.

Detective Inspector Jackie Gilfillan from OCCTU said: “What our investigation established is that Peter Morgan’s interest in explosives, coupled with his extreme right-wing beliefs, made him a danger to not only himself, but the public.

“None of the items recovered from Morgan’s address had been made into any form of viable explosive and we were able to intervene before he could attempt to construct any device capable of doing harm.

“Whenever such individuals come to our attention, a thorough investigation will be undertaken to gather evidence, which we will then act upon to bring them to justice.

“The Action Counters Terrorism Campaign (ACT), recognises the important role the public have to play in preventing terrorism and whenever such individuals come to our attention a thorough investigation is undertaken to gather evidence and bring them to justice.

“While on this occasion, we were able to take action and prevent any danger to the public, any concerns held by members of the public should be reported to the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321.”

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

An alleged member of the banned neo-Nazi group National Action has admitted to plotting to kill a British MP and making threats to kill a police officer.

Jack Renshaw, 23, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius machete to kill the West Lancashire Labour MP Rosie Cooper last summer.

On the opening day of his trial at the Old Bailey on Tuesday, Renshaw pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism and making threats to kill a police officer, DC Victoria Henderson.

The judge, Mr Justice Robert Jay, directed the jury to deliver a formal guilty verdict on the two charges. Renshaw also faces a third charge of membership of the banned far right group, which he denies.

He is on trial alongside Christopher Lythgoe, 32, from Warrington, who is charged with encouraging Renshaw to murder Cooper on behalf of National Action, believing the act would be committed. He denies the charges.

Four other men – Garron Helm, 24, of Seaforth, Merseyside; Matthew Hankinson, 24, of Newton-le-Willows, Merseyside; Andrew Clark, 33, and Michael Trubini, 35, both of Warrington – are also charged with membership of National Action. They deny the charge.

The court heard that Renshaw had bought the machete to kill Cooper between 5 June and 3 July last year. He made threats while in a pub in Warrington on 1 July last year, it was alleged.

Duncan Atkinson, prosecuting, told the court that National Action had engaged since 2013 in a campaign of “virulently racist, antisemitic and homophobic propaganda through which it sought to stir up a violent ‘race war’ against ethnic minorities and others it perceived as ‘race traitors’.”

He said the group “actively sought to recruit and radicalise young people through the violent imagery and hate-filled language of its social media messages, its provocative street demonstrations and intimidation of local communities”.

It was such activities, culminating it its support of the murder of the Labour MP Jo Cox in June 2016, that led to its proscription by the home secretary in December 2016.

The court heard how a significant amount of evidence came from a former member of National Action called Robbie Mullen. Mullen, the prosecution said, told how the group, under the leadership of Lythgoe, continued to function post-proscription, with the primary desire to start a race war and to free “white Britain”.

Other sources of evidence included material found at the defendants’ addresses and on their electronic devices, including communications with each other. All of the defendants are alleged to be part of the north-west area groups, which met at a pub in Warrington called the Friar Penketh.

The prosecution said Renshaw planned to engage in politically motivated murder, and sought the approval of the organisation and hoped to advance its cause through this killing. His motivation was also personal, the court heard.

Renshaw was arrested on 11 January 2017 on suspicion of stirring up racial hatred. He was interviewed by an officer called DC Victoria Henderson and a male police officer, before being released pending further investigation.

On Renshaw’s arrest, a phone was recovered and analysed, revealing what police considered to be evidence of child sex offences (grooming), the court heard. Renshaw was again arrested and interviewed in respect of those allegations on 19 May 2017, again by a team including Henderson.

On 1 July 2017, the prosecution said there was a meeting at the Friar Penketh pub attended by most of the defendants. Mullen was also there.

At this meeting, Renshaw told the group he was planning to kill his local member of parliament, Cooper. “She was of the same party, Labour, as Jo Cox MP had been: she was therefore perceived to have the same support for immigration to this country that has been advanced as a reason for Jo Cox’s death, and more especially for National Action’s support for the actions of her murderer,” Atkinson said.

During the meeting Renshaw said that after killing Cooper he would take some people hostage and would demand that DC Henderson attended the scene. “His plan then would be to kill the officer who was, he said, his real target,” Atkinson said.

Renshaw said he had already purchased the machete that he would use to carry out the killing. The weapon, marketed online as offering “19 inches of unprecedented piercing and slashing power at a bargain price”, was later found by police hidden in an airing cupboard.

Renshaw’s internet search history also related to wounding and his identified target, Cooper.

The court heard how nothing of significance would happen without Lythgoe’s approval, and that was why Renshaw brought up the plan. Lythgoe’s alleged response was to give his consent by saying “don’t fuck it up”. He also advised Renshaw to take precautions to ensure his media devices were not linked to other members in the group, the court heard.

Atkinson, prosecuting, said: “The politically and racially motivated killing of an MP would be an act of terrorism, and Renshaw is charged with preparing to carry out just an act.”

Mullen, believing that Renshaw was serious and there was a real and imminent threat to life, reported what had been said to his contacts at Hope Not Hate, after which Cooper was warned of the threat and a police investigation was launched.

National Action was the first extreme rightwing group to be proscribed since the second world war, and the 85th group to be proscribed in the UK overall.
The Guardian

Jack Renshaw, 23, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius Machete to kill Rosie Cooper last summer

Jack Renshaw has admitted plotting to kill the MP

Jack Renshaw has admitted plotting to kill the MP

An alleged National Action member has admitted plotting to murder an MP.

Jack Renshaw, 23, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius Machete to kill Rosie Cooper last summer.

On the opening day of his trial, Renshaw pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism as well as making a threat to kill police officer Victoria Henderson.

Judge Mr Justice Jay directed the jury to deliver a formal guilty verdict on the first two charges Renshaw faces.

He is on trial alongside Christopher Lythgoe, 32, from Warrington, who denies giving Renshaw permission to murder the West Lancashire MP on behalf of National Action on July 1 last year.

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

The pair, along with Garron Helm, 24, of Seaforth, Merseyside, Matthew Hankinson, 24, of Newton-le-Willows, Merseyside, Andrew Clarke, 33, and Michal Trubini, 35, both of Warrington, also deny membership of the banned far right group.

The case continues in court.

 Court sketch of the accused sat in the Old Bailey (Image: Julia Quenzler / SWNS.com)

Court sketch of the accused sat in the Old Bailey (Image: Julia Quenzler / SWNS.com)

Daily Mirror

James Swindlehurst

James Swindlehurst



A ‘HORRIFIC’ South Yorkshire paedophile who raped two vulnerable young children after buying them sweets has been jailed for 20 years.

James Andrew Swindlehurst, 43, of Rockingham Street, Honeywell, Barnsley was sentenced at Leeds Crown Court after being found guilty of 13 non-recent counts of rape and indecent assault of a child.

Swindlehurst denied the offences against two victims that spanned a five-year period during the 1990s and 2000s.

He was found guilty by a jury following a trial at Sheffield Crown Court in October.

Detective Constable Elinor Duke, leading the investigation, said: “This man took advantage of the fact that the children were vulnerable.

“He gained their trust by building a friendship with them and making them feel ‘needed’.

“He would buy them sweets and take them out before carrying out a prolonged period of sexual abuse, telling them that there was no point telling anyone as nobody would believe them.”

The victims made a disclosure to police in April 2014 and Swindlehurst was arrested and a full investigation was carried out.

DC Duke added: “The bravery that the victims have shown in coming forward is exceptional.

“They did it with the motivation to prevent Swindlehurst hurting any other children.

“It is testament to the courage of the victims that he is now facing 20 years behind bars and I hope today’s sentencing sends a message that we will take action and catch those responsible for such horrific acts.”

Yorkshire Post



A CASTLEFORD man found to be a member of the now-banned neo-Nazi group National Action been jailed for four-years-and-three-months for posting racist and anti-Semitic messages.

Wayne Bell, age 37, of Mount Walk, Castleford, posted an image on a Russian social media site showing a man being hung by a rope with a Star of David on his forehead, the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said.

In another post he described Jewish people as “destructive” and “vile”.

Prosecutors said Bell was also behind hate-filled graffiti.

A CPS spokesman said that Bell posted in August 2016, “The only way,” below a photo of a police officer’s foot raised above the head of an unarmed black man, lying on the ground.

The spokesman said that in late 2016 he posted a number of messages on Twitter continuing his campaign of stirring up hatred against Jewish and black people.

Bell was a prominent member of National Action before its was banned 18 months ago and he featured in two posters used in a recruitment campaign.

The spokesman said 13 videos were found on Bell’s mobile phone and featured an unseen man – believed to be Bell – directing others who were daubing anti-Semitic graffiti, including swastikas and references to the Holocaust.

A rucksack found at his workplace in Leeds contained National Action stickers.

Bell pleaded guilty at Leeds Crown Court to two counts of stirring up racial hatred and three counts of possession of items with intent to destroy or damage property.

Last year he was sentenced to 30 months in prison after clashes between members of National Action and anti-fascist groups in Liverpool in February 2016.

Head of the Counter-Terrorism Division in the CPS, Sue Hemming, said: “Wayne Bell is a committed racist who posted messages on social media intending to stir up racial hatred against Jewish and black people.

“He was also behind graffiti that promoted his Neo-Nazi views and his deep rooted-hatred of all non-Aryan races.”

Detective Chief Superintendent Martin Snowden, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing North East, said: “Activity like this has the potential to both influence vulnerable people and threaten the stability of our communities by inciting hatred and threatening public safety and security.

“We will not tolerate any action which attempts to undermine or divide our communities and will continue to counter extremism and terrorism in all its forms.”

Chief Superintendent Mabs Hussain, district commander of Wakefield Police, said: “We welcome Bell’s sentence today for what are serious offences intended to cause to cause disharmony between communities, and I am very pleased with the investigation conducted by colleagues at Counter Terrorism Policing North East.

“The Wakefield district overwhelmingly enjoys good and positive relationships between its various communities and I am pleased that extremists such as Bell are in a very small minority indeed.”

Yorkshire Evening Post