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A MAN who launched a spray paint attack on homeless man Michael Cash has today been sentenced to an 18 month community order.

Aaron Jones, of Balmoral Road, Middlesbrough, appeared at Teesside Magistrates Court today to face charges of common assault and criminal damage following the attack early last month.

The 33-year-old, who turned up for the hearing with his face hidden by a child’s Frankenstein mask, pleaded guilty to both charges.

Michael Cash, 32, was found dead in a cemetery three days after the assault which happened near Tesco Express in Normanby High Street, Middlesbrough.

Chairman of the bench Stephen Walker sentenced Jones to 18 month community order, 180 hours unpaid work and 20 hours of rehabilitation activity days. He was also ordered to pay £85 court cost, £85 victim surcharge and £100 compensation for the damage.

He said: “We have put this in the highest category of common assault, the reason being is that if the aggravating factors – it was a targeted attack with an element of premedication. He was a vulnerable victim and it was shared on social media.”

Cleveland Police said Mr Cash’s death was not treated as suspicious and was not connected with anything which happened on September 9 outside the store.

Police officers attended court today in case of a disturbance in the public gallery.
Northern Echo

He damaged the vehicle as he attempted to take it from the owner’s Dewsbury home

A man caught trying to steal a van was so drunk he had no recollection of what happened.

Alex Grogan pleaded guilty to offences of taking a vehicle without consent, failing to provide a specimen of breath, using a vehicle without insurance and driving otherwise than in accordance with a licence when he appeared at Kirklees Magistrates’ Court.

The court heard that the victim had parked his Mercedes Sprinter van outside his home on Mitre Street in Dewsbury.

His wife then witnessed it being broken into and called police.

Grogan, of Moorcroft Road, Dewsbury, had broken the glass in the driver’s side window before climbing into the seat.

He had no keys for the vehicle but pulled the handbrake off and it rolled a short distance down the street into the kerb edge.

Police arrived, pulled the 20-year-old from the van and arrested him.

Some damage had been caused to the vehicle as he attempted to start it, with the broken glass and wiring hanging down below the steering wheel.

Grogan then refused to give a breath sample at the police station.

Zahid Majeed, mitigating, said that his client had no recollection of the incident due to drinking.

District Judge Michael Fanning sentenced Grogan to a Dewsbury with 33 days of rehabilitative activities and a 10-week curfew.

He was banned from driving for two years and ordered to pay £130 compensation, £85 costs and £85 victim surcharge.

Huddersfield Examiner

From 2016

A vandal who painted offensive graffiti on a random pub and house ‘has no idea’ why he did so.

Kieron Wright, 23, used black paint to daub slogans onto the wall of a house in Hylton Road, and the nearby Railway Tavern pub, Sunderland magistrates heard.

The court was told the properties were randomly selected, and had nothing to do with what was written on them.

Prosecutor Lee Poppett said: “This case concerns three offences of graffiti, for want of a better term.”

Mr Poppett said a rented property was defaced twice, on July 3, and July 7.

And on July 4, he repeated the offence on an outside wall of the Railway Tavern.

Mr Poppett added: “There is no suggestion that either of the premises were targeted in any way, or racially motivated in any way.

“Mr Wright has taken it upon himself to write on them in black paint.”

He was identified from CCTV footage and when police searched his house, they found a small amount of cannabis bush.

Wright, of Rosedale Street, Sunderland, admitted three counts of criminal damage, possession of cannabis, and breaching two conditional discharges.

He has 33 previous convictions for a total of 47 offences, five of which were criminal damage.

Tony Southwick, defending, said: “The second incident on July 7, he painted over what he had previously painted. He added a little bit extra.

“This was not targeted in any way. It’s not racially aggravated because he would not have known who the landlord was.

“He has no explanation as to why he has done this.

“He accepts that the small quantity of cannabis in the house was for his own personal use. He tells me it’s barely enough to make one joint.

“He was laid off from work in May and he uses cannabis more or less on a daily basis because he is bored.”

Wright was sentenced to a six-month community order with 10 days’ specified activity.

He was told to pay a £50 fine, and £110 in compensation.

Sunderland Echo

Geoffrey Farquharson sent a racist and homophobic voice message to Ben Bradshaw the day before Jo Cox MP was killed

Geoffrey Farquharson, 37, leaves Exeter magistrates court after receiving a 12-week prison sentence, suspended for two years. Photograph: Rod Minchin/PA

Geoffrey Farquharson, 37, leaves Exeter magistrates court after receiving a 12-week prison sentence, suspended for two years. Photograph: Rod Minchin/PA

A man who sent a threatening voice message to senior Labour MP Ben Bradshaw the day before the killing of parliamentary colleague Jo Cox has been given a suspended sentence.

In the two-minute message Geoffrey Farquharson, 37, shouts down the phone, swears repeatedly and makes threats towards the former culture secretary. The racist and homophobic message, which was left on the answerphone of Bradshaw’s parliamentary office, was sent the day before Labour MP Cox was killed in June this year.

The message made Bradshaw fearful for the safety of his staff, Exeter magistrates court heard. District Judge Stephen Nichols sentenced Farquharson to 12 weeks’ imprisonment, suspended for two years.

He was also given a 25-day community order, banned indefinitely from contacting Bradshaw or attending his constituency office, and ordered to pay £85 prosecution costs.

The judge told him: “The message was clearly homophobic, Islamophobic and racist and there was clearly a death threat to Mr Bradshaw.

“You accept through your guilty plea that the message you sent to Mr Bradshaw was highly offensive. In the message, your voice became extremely angry and you make threats and use highly offensive and abusive language.”

In the message, which was played to the court, Farquharson starts by giving his full name and address and says he has just watched a video on Facebook about Muslim extremism.

Farquharson then launches a homophobic tirade against Bradshaw, who is gay, and repeatedly goads the MP to call the police. The defendant uses highly offensive language throughout, and describes Bradshaw as “evil”.

The call was picked up by a member of the MP’s staff, who raised the alarm. After Bradshaw reported the matter to the police, Farquharson was arrested the following day.

The court heard that the MP had made a victim impact statement, in which he said: “Having had death threats before I was not unduly concerned about myself and more concerned about my staff, particularly in Exeter, who have borne the brunt of Mr Farquharson.”

He went on to say that public servants should not have to put up with threats and abuse from members of the public and that his concerns had been heightened because of the killing of Cox.

At a previous hearing, Farquharson, of Exeter, had pleaded guilty to sending an indecent or grossly offensive message. Farquharson, who suffers from mental health issues, was accompanied by his carer when he returned to court to be sentenced.

The judge heard that Farquharson had autism and a difficult upbringing. Rob Jacobs, defending, said Farquharson’s “anger and annoyance” had been building up at what he saw as “concerns for others” and he had “lost his temper”.

Jacobs said: “Mr Farquharson is both very vulnerable and probably a very lonely individual. I don’t think he would mind me saying that that he has too much time to think and ruminate on his political views. It is true that his political views are strongly held.

“He would say that he does not hold homophobic or racist views himself and the words he used were a manifestation of his anger and frustration, rather than him holding any anti-social views.”

Last week, Bradshaw said the abuse dished out to politicians on social media had got worse since the death of Cox. He told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire show he believed it was now “socially acceptable” to use Facebook and Twitter to abuse politicians and he hoped the killing would lead to a “deeper reflection” about the political culture in the UK.

The Guardian

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An impatient man made racist remarks and gave a Nazi salute while he was at Blackpool police headquarters.

Darren Dale was annoyed because he thought the wait to see whether police would recommend he got a peddlars licence was too long,

Dale, , 37, of Reads Avenue, Blackpool, pleaded guilty to racially aggravated threatening behaviour.

He was sentenced to a 12 months community order with up to 20 days rehabilitation to be supervised by the probation service, put on an eight weeks curfew and ordered to pay £85 costs with £85 victims’ surcharge by Blackpool magistrates.

Prosecutor, Martine Connah, said Dale went into Blackpool police station to ask about a peddlars certificate on July 15. An inquiry assistant told him an inspector was considering the matter. He replied the country was done for and kept making racist remarks under his breath.

The assistant said his remarks were inappropriate considering the recent events in France. Dale gave a Nazi salute and said: “I’m going to change my religion and kill people.”
Peter Cave, defending, told the court Dale had been waiting for six weeks for his peddlars license and became distressed.

Blackpool Gazette

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A man who made more than 100 nuisance calls to Sussex Police has been convicted.

David Peapell, of Dyke Road in Brighton, made a total of 108 calls to the 101 non-emergency number and sent 56 text messages to an officer between 30 July and 2 September.

This was despite him being issued with a warning letter about his unnecessary number of calls in October 2014.

The 48-year-old, who is unemployed, pleaded guilty to persistently making use of a public electronic communications network for the purpose of causing annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety to employees of Sussex Police when he appeared at Brighton Magistrates’ Court on Thursday (3 December).

Contact centre investigator Sarah-Louise Gliddon said: “Mr Peapell has been a persistent caller for a number of years and was given a warning by the local policing team in October 2014 to only make contact with police to report a new incident or an emergency which required police response.

“He ignored the warning and continued to make excessive calls to police on the 101 non-emergency number, and excessively text the police officer who had dealt with him.

“The volume and the frequency of Peapell’s calls impacted the contact centre’s ability to provide a service to the public, who genuinely needed police assistance or attendance whilst he was calling.

“We now actively peruse persistent callers, issuing them with warnings about how their unnecessary contact affects our ability to service other members of the public trying to report police incidents on the 101 number and 999 emergency lines.

“People who contact us persistently will be dealt within the context of an offence of wasting police time and face court if they continue to make unnecessary contact stopping us dealing with the public that do need our assistance.”

Peapell was sentenced to a 12-month community order. He was also fined £40, and ordered to pay a £60 victim surcharge, £50 in costs and a £150 criminal court charge.

Juice Brighton

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