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Police searching Peter Morgan’s flat also found an IRA volunteers’ handbook on guerilla warfare, a Ku Klux Klan application form and an Al Qaeda terrorism manual.

Police searching Peter Morgan's Edinburgh flat found bomb-making equipment and far-right literature (Image: Police/Daily Record)

Police searching Peter Morgan’s Edinburgh flat found bomb-making equipment and far-right literature (Image: Police/Daily Record)

A right-wing extremist who was caught with a bomb making kit after emergency services rushed to his home answering a 999 call has been jailed.

Police called in to search 35-year-old Peter Morgan’s flat after a woman collapsed found a glass bottle studded with lead shot and nail gun rounds along with explosive powder, fuses, screws and steel tacks.

An Army bomb disposal expert told the High Court in Edinburgh that a “quite effective, viable” improvised explosive device (IED) could have been made from the items discovered.

Sergeant Liam Davies told prosecution lawyer Ashley Edwards QC: “I believe that this is a bomb in construction or waiting to be constructed.”

The experienced explosive ordnance disposal soldier said the complicated weapon could cause “horrific injury” with severe bleeding and potential death without prompt medical intervention.

He said the potential shrapnel glued to the exterior of the vinegar shaker was telling and if the screws and tacks were put in with an explosive mixture placed inside the bottle that would add to the fragmentation effect.

During the search of Morgan’s home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh, officers also found a Nazi swastika flag, far-right literature and a German World War II dagger.

Police also discovered he downloaded an international application form to become a “loyal white knight of the Klu Klux Klan.”

Morgan had also acquired copies of an Al Qaeda terrorism manual, an IRA volunteers’ handbook on guerilla warfare and works on turning guns into fully automatic weapons as well as guides on improvised explosives and interrogation techniques.

Jurors heard he was “quite proud” that he was part of the Scottish Defence League and travelled with others from the far right group to a white pride rally in Manchester in 2015.

 Peter Morgan, pictured at a white pride rally, had an Al Qaeda terrorism manual at his home (Image: Handout)

Peter Morgan, pictured at a white pride rally, had an Al Qaeda terrorism manual at his home (Image: Handout)

He was photographed attending the march with his hood up carrying a Scottish Saltire flag and holding a “white pride worldwide” poster.

The story emerged on Friday after Morgan, a prisoner of HMP Edinburgh, was convicted of charges under the Terrorism Act.

Jurors convicted Morgan of charges which stated he possessed items and collected information which give “rise to a reasonable suspicion” that he was planning “acts of terrorism.”

Morgan’s offending took place between April 2012 and July 2017.

Experts say a 'quite effective' bomb could have been made from the items at Peter Morgan's home

Experts say a ‘quite effective’ bomb could have been made from the items at Peter Morgan’s home

Judge Lord Boyd remanded Morgan – who has convictions dating back two decades – in custody in order for the court to obtain reports about his character.

He said: “I could sentence you today but I prefer to obtain a full report about your background. I will refrain from making comments about the offences to which you have been convicted of.

“In the meantime, you will be remanded in custody.”

Morgan spent the trial denying any wrongdoing.

During proceedings, the jury heard that police and ambulance personnel had originally attended at the block of flats where Taylor lived on July 2 last year because a woman had collapsed and was found to have no pulse.

A resident said she previously saw the woman at Morgan’s flat and police decided to force entry because of concerns for others and a sergeant kicked the door in.

Fireworks and other bomb making equipment was found at Peter Morgan's Edinburgh flat

Fireworks and other bomb making equipment was found at Peter Morgan’s Edinburgh flat

No one was found in the flat at the time but officers noticed drugs paraphernalia such as needles and scales and the premises were secured. Morgan was later seen nearby.

Search officers were dispatched to the property and right-wing flags, leaflets and stickers were found. PC Paul Nicholson, 46, said as they searched drawers, the vinegar bottle, which had lead shot and cartridges glued to its outside, was found.

A large quantity of commercial fireworks were discovered some of which had been taken apart. A dagger bearing the symbol of an eagle mounted on a swastika was found under a sofa in the living room.

DC Murray Cairns, 44, said a decision was taken to seize items found in the flat with the assistance of military ordnance personnel.

A selection of fuses that Peter Morgan could have used to create a bomb

A selection of fuses that Peter Morgan could have used to create a bomb

He said a military expert viewed the items found in the bottom drawer of a chest of drawers and added: “He agreed it was potential component parts of an improvised explosive device.”

Computers taken from Morgan’s flat were analysed and it was found he had a PDF of the Turner Diaries , a novel seen as the bible of the racist right in America.

He was also found to have sent a message saying: “I just hate the f*****g Muslims. Don’t want any more of those f*****s up here.”

Morgan also said Muslims ‘p****d’ him off regardless of them being White, Black or Asian.

A military expert confirmed the items in Peter Morgan's home could make a bomb

A military expert confirmed the items in Peter Morgan’s home could make a bomb

When Morgan, who was on a prescription for the heroin substitute Methodone, was arrested, he said: “How can they get away with charging me for fireworks you can buy out of shops.

“It’s not like a bomb has been made out of them. It’s not like they have injured people.”

However, jurors concluded that Morgan was planning terrorism attacks.

Morgan will be sentenced at the High Court in Edinburgh on August 16, 2018.

Daily Record

A right-wing extremist who was caught with a bomb-making kit during an unrelated call-out to the death of a teenage woman in Edinburgh has been found guilty of terrorism offences.

Peter Morgan’s flat was searched on 5 July 2017 after a woman collapsed.

Police found a glass bottle studded with lead shot and nail gun rounds along with explosive powder, fuses, screws and steel tacks.

Morgan will be sentenced at the High Court in Edinburgh on 16 August 2018.

An Army bomb disposal expert told the High Court in Edinburgh that a “quite effective, viable” improvised explosive device (IED) could have been made from the items discovered.

Sgt Liam Davies told prosecution lawyer Ashley Edwards: “I believe that this is a bomb in construction or waiting to be constructed.”

The experienced explosive ordnance disposal soldier said the complicated weapon could cause “horrific injury” with severe bleeding and potential death without prompt medical intervention.

He said the potential shrapnel glued to the exterior of the vinegar shaker was telling and if the screws and tacks were put in with an explosive mixture placed inside the bottle that would add to the fragmentation effect.

During the search of Morgan’s home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh, officers also found a Nazi swastika flag, far-right literature and a German World War Two dagger.

Police also discovered he downloaded an international application form to become a “loyal white knight of the Klu Klux Klan”.

Morgan had also acquired copies of an Al Qaeda terrorism manual, an IRA volunteers handbook on guerrilla warfare and works on turning guns into fully automatic weapons as well as guides on improvised explosives and interrogation techniques.

Jurors heard he was “quite proud” he was part of the Scottish Defence League and travelled with others from the far-right group to a white pride rally in Manchester in 2015.

Jurors convicted Morgan of charges which stated he possessed items and collected information which give “rise to a reasonable suspicion” that he was planning “acts of terrorism.”

Morgan’s offending took place between April 2012 and July 2017.

Judge Lord Boyd remanded Morgan, who has convictions dating back two decades, in custody in order for the court to obtain reports about Morgan’s character.

Morgan had denied the charges.

During proceedings, the jury heard that police and ambulance personnel had originally attended at the block of flats where Taylor lived on July 2 last year because a woman had collapsed and was found to have no pulse.

A resident said she had previously seen the woman at Morgan’s flat and police decided to force entry because of concerns for others and a sergeant kicked the door in.

The flat was found to be empty but officers noticed drugs paraphernalia such as needles and scales and the premises were secured. Morgan was later seen nearby.

Search officers were dispatched to the property and right wing flags, leaflets and stickers were found.

BBC News

A man found in possession of explosive items and extreme right-wing paraphernalia has been convicted.

At Edinburgh High Court on Friday 13th July Peter Morgan was found guilty of two offences under the Terrorism Act 2000 and one offence under the Explosive Substances Act 1883 after police recovered items linked to the construction of an explosive device from his home in Taylor Place, Edinburgh.

Officers from the Organised Crime and Counter Terrorism Unit carried out a search of the house on 5th July 2017, supported by colleagues from the EOD.

A number of items, which could be used to construct a bomb were seized along with a number of phones and computer equipment.

Following analysis of the computer equipment and phones, it was established that 35-year-old Morgan had been researching racist content and information on constructing explosives.

Nazi flags and stickers and National Front literature was also found within the address.

Morgan was arrested and has been remanded in custody since 5th July 2017.

Detective Inspector Jackie Gilfillan from OCCTU said: “What our investigation established is that Peter Morgan’s interest in explosives, coupled with his extreme right-wing beliefs, made him a danger to not only himself, but the public.

“None of the items recovered from Morgan’s address had been made into any form of viable explosive and we were able to intervene before he could attempt to construct any device capable of doing harm.

“Whenever such individuals come to our attention, a thorough investigation will be undertaken to gather evidence, which we will then act upon to bring them to justice.

“The Action Counters Terrorism Campaign (ACT), recognises the important role the public have to play in preventing terrorism and whenever such individuals come to our attention a thorough investigation is undertaken to gather evidence and bring them to justice.

“While on this occasion, we were able to take action and prevent any danger to the public, any concerns held by members of the public should be reported to the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321.”

A man has been jailed for having explosives, weapons and ammunition following a joint investigation by police in Hertfordshire and Counter Terrorism officers from the Met and the Eastern Region Special Operations Unit (ERSOU).

Warren Snedden, 45 (05.05.73) of Longcroft Lane, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire was sentenced at Woolwich Crown Court on Friday, 15 June to a total of 10 years’ imprisonment and to serve an additional five years’ on extended licence.

Snedden was previously found guilty on Tuesday, 27 March of having an explosive substance. He also previously pleaded guilty to a number of other offences including: possession of documents containing information likely to be useful for terrorist purposes; possession of firearms and ammunition; and, production of cannabis.

Police were alerted to a suspicious transaction on an online auction site in July 2017, where a number of chemicals associated with the production of the explosive TATP were purchased. Further enquiries linked the purchases to Snedden.

A search warrant was carried out on 29 September 2017 by Hertfordshire Constabulary at his address in Welwyn Garden City, where officers found the chemicals in Snedden’s bedroom, along with a number of tilt switches that are often used in the production of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

Police also found component parts of a firearm, an air rifle and over 200 rounds of ammunition – all items Snedden was specifically prohibited from possessing, having previously been convicted of an armed robbery offence in 2001. A small number of cannabis plants were also found growing in his garden.

Snedden’s digital devices were seized and later examined. Detectives found copies of terrorist-related manuals and documents detailing how to make and create home-made ammunition, weapons and explosives.

Snedden was charged and remanded in custody; he appeared at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 2 October 2017, and his case was subsequently referred on to Woolwich Crown Court for trial.

Commander Clarke Jarrett, Head of the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command, said: “Snedden never gave a full explanation as to what he was planning to do with the array of chemicals, weaponry and ammunition he had stockpiled. What is clear is that what he was doing was putting both himself, his neighbours and the public in great danger.

“This was a joint investigation between the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command and colleagues from Hertfordshire Constabulary, as well officers from ERSOU’s counter terrorism policing unit. The excellent work across all three has led to a number of dangerous components and weapons being taken out of circulation.

“The case is also a further reminder of the need to be ever-vigilant and I would urge anyone who sees any suspicious activity or behaviour to ACT and report it to police.”

Any suspicious behaviour or activity can be reported via this online tool or by calling the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321.

Detective Superintendent Rob Bartlett, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing for ERSOU, said: “Although we may never understand why Snedden stockpiled these items and was viewing such material, there is no doubt that he posed a very real threat to society.

“This case was a great example of agencies working together in order to prevent someone from causing harm, and removing dangerous weapons and chemicals from circulation.

“The Action Counters Terrorism campaign urges people to be vigilant to suspicious activity such as the ordering of illegal firearms or the gathering of chemical materials so this is a timely reminder for people to be alert and report anything they find concerning.”

Snedden was convicted of the following offences:

Two counts of having an explosive substance; two counts of possession of a prohibited weapon; two counts of possession of a firearm without a certificate; possession of ammunition without a certificate; possession of ammunition when prohibited; possession of a firearm by a person previously convicted of crime; three counts of possession of a document containing information useful for terrorist purposes; production of cannabis.

Met Police

Ian Forman of Birkenhead sentenced to 10 years in prison after making homemade bomb and drawing up list of targets

Nazi sympathiser Ian Forman, who has been jailed for 10 years for preparing for acts of terrorism. Photograph: Greater Manchester Police/PA

Nazi sympathiser Ian Forman, who has been jailed for 10 years for preparing for acts of terrorism. Photograph: Greater Manchester Police/PA

A Nazi sympathiser who planned to blow up mosques in Merseyside has been jailed for 10 years.

Ian Forman, 42, from Birkenhead, was convicted of engaging in conduct in preparation of terrorist acts following an 11-day trial in March.

Forman, who had a “deep hatred” of Muslims, made a list of mosques near his home, which he referred to as his “dreck ziel” – a German phrase literally meaning “filth target”.

He researched how to make bombs online and tested explosives at his home before police discovered chemicals and a homemade explosive device in his bedroom in June last year, Kingston crown court heard.

Forman, who expressed rightwing views on social media and spoke of his admiration of Adolf Hitler and the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik, owned part of an SS officer’s uniform which he planned to display on a mannequin, the court heard.

Police found a film he had made of himself wearing an SS officer’s hat while playing video games.

Sentencing Forman to 10 years, the judge, Paul Dodgson, said the would-be terrorist had acted in a “racist, abusive and extremely offensive manner”.

He added: “You in your perverted way believed that your activities were a continuation of Nazi warfare.”

David Mason QC, in mitigation, said Forman was “not your average terrorist” and had struggled in Belmarsh prison alongside a large number of inmates from ethnic minorities.

“Everything this man did was geared towards his hate towards the ethnic community,” he said.

“It is consistent with someone who thought about it for a very long time but actually never stepped out of his front door to do it. He perhaps came across as someone rather pathetic, very bright, holding appalling views but not your average terrorist.”

Forman came to the attention of police in April 2013 while he worked as a receptionist at a glass recycling firm in Ellesmere Port.

Colleagues found that he had been researching chemicals and explosive substances on the internet during work hours – a breach of company policy.

He was called in for internal disciplinary meetings, during which he claimed his research was for his hobby of making fireworks.

Unconvinced, the company called Merseyside police, prompting his arrest.

After the sentencing on Thursday, DS Matt Findell of the north-west counter-terrorism unit said: “Thankfully, we will never know how far Forman was prepared to go in acting out his racist fantasies.

“However, we do know that Forman had carefully selected a number of targets to meet his own means. Had he carried them out, his attacks could have caused considerable damage to both property and people at several mosques.

“The north-west counter-terrorism unit has extensive experience of investigating individuals and groups who hope to threaten, intimidate and attack people for their own twisted political ends.

“We have demonstrated once again with today’s result that we will use every means at our disposal to protect our communities.”
The Guardian

From 2014

A 25-year-old man from Banff convicted of planning terrorism attacks on mosques has been jailed for life.

A judge told Connor Ward he must serve at least six years before he is eligible for parole.

His trial heard he acquired components for potential bombs and kept a list of Scottish mosque addresses.

Ward had denied breaching the Terrorism Act but was charged with conduct which showed his intention to commit acts of terrorism.

Police who searched his home found hundreds of ball bearings, which could be used in pipe bombs, and rocket tubes capable of firing projectiles.

‘Catastrophic results’

At the High Court in Glasgow, judge Lord Burns told him: “The jury found you guilty and must have been satisfied you were in the course of preparing acts of terrorism.

“The jury’s view was that you formed an intention to attack a mosque or mosques in Aberdeen and would have acted alone.

“You had reached the stage of identifying your targets and expressed threats against Muslims.”

Lord Burns said that if Ward had carried out the acts of terrorism “it would have had catastrophic results.”

‘Serious public risk’

The judge added: “You had reached the stage of buying materials and you planned to cause serious injury at the least.

“Your obsession with weapons and explosives and your extreme right-wing attitudes presents serious risk to the public.”

Ward showed no emotion as he was led away to begin his sentence.

The trial had been held at the High Court in Edinburgh.

He was previously jailed for three years in 2012 after admitting explosives charges in connection with an incident which saw people evacuated from their homes.

BBC News

A Scots ‘neo-Nazi’ who gathered components to make bombs and kept a list of Scottish mosque addresses has been jailed for life.

Connor Ward, from Banff in Aberdeenshire, acquired hundreds of ball bearings which could be used in pipe bombs and rocket tubes which could be used to fire projectiles.

He also had a stun gun, hundreds of knuckle dusters, knives and metal bars.

The 25-year-old was sentenced to life in prison for breaching the Terrorism Act 2000 and the Terrorism Act 2006. It will be six years before he is eligible for parole.

Ward acquired a mobile phone signal jamming device and a machine for picking up hidden bugs.

He also downloaded tens of thousands of documents on guns and survival techniques. The files also contained extreme right-wing propaganda and military tactics.

Detectives also found a Google Maps-style file containing the postal addresses of five Islamic places of worship in the Aberdeen area on Ward’s computer.

They also found that Ward, who told jurors that he thought Hitler had made mistakes, had started to compose a book called “Combat 18 British Mosque Address Book”.

Lord Burns told him: “The jury found you guilty and must have been satisfied you were in the course of preparing acts of terrorism.

“The jury’s view was that you formed an intention to attack a Mosque or Mosques in Aberdeen and would have acted alone. You had reached the stage of identifying your targets and expressed threats against Muslims.”

Lord Burns said that if Ward had carried out the acts of terrorism “It would have had catastrophic results”.

The judge added: “You had reached the stage of buying materials and you planned to cause serious injury at the least. Your obsession with weapons and explosives and your extreme right-wing attitudes presents serious risk to the public.”

Combat 18 is the name of an extreme British right-wing paramilitary group.

Ward had previously been jailed for three years at the High Court in Edinburgh on another explosives charge.

He was also given a 22-month jail sentence in April 2015 for possessing a stun gun.

Ward was convicted in July 2016 of having an “improvised” knife whilst serving that prison sentence and given another 18 months.

In August 2016, the court heard how Ward was sentenced to another four months in custody for assaulting somebody whilst in custody.

STV