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A man has admitted he was responsible for racist graffiti at a Fulwood mosque.

Gavin Edghill, 47, of Lower Bank Road, Fulwood, pleaded guilty to five counts of racially aggravated criminal damage, one offence of racially aggravated public order and a further five counts of criminal damage.

Police launched an investigation after three separate reports of offensive and racist graffiti at Masjid E Salaam Mosque in Watling Street Road over the weekend.

Similar graffiti was found on an NHS sign nearby.

Edghill was arrested and appeared at Preston Magistrates’ Court today (Tuesday 23 April).

He was remanded in custody and will be sentenced in May.

Blog Preston

Steven Bishop, 41, had become fixated on the youngest victim of Manchester Arena attack

A violent racist with a history of mental health problems who admitted a terrorist offence and stockpiling equipment to bomb a mosque has been jailed for four years, one of the lowest sentences for someone plotting a potentially deadly attack.

Steven Bishop, 41, amassed commercial grade fireworks and other equipment as he formed the intention to build a homemade firebomb he would remotely detonate to attack the Morden mosque, in south London. He may serve just over another year in prison before his release on licence.

He claimed his plot was “revenge” for the Manchester arena bombing in 2017 in which 22 people died, but was stopped in October 2018 after a counsellor he saw for addictions reported Bishop to police after he told her of his plans.

Bishop had pleaded guilty earlier this week at Kingston crown court to two offences, one under the Explosive Substances Act 1883 and the other, having material useful for terrorism.

Concerns have been raised about the length of sentence, as British authorities try to show they take extremist rightwing violence as seriously as Islamist attacks.

Lord Carlile, the former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, told the Guardian: “It is one of the lowest sentences for this kind of offence.

“I would expect the prosecution would consider appealing this sentence on the grounds that it is unduly lenient. I would be surprised if that was not the view of the Crown Prosecution Service.”

A spokesperson for the Muslim Council of Britain said: “There will be deep concern amongst many that this man was given a relatively light sentence even though he was poised to murder people.

“We learned from the case that Mr Bishop was driven by a hatred of Muslims. We hope we will be able to learn how the punishment fits this particularly serious crime.”

The Guardian understands the length of sentence also caused surprise among counter-terrorism investigators.

When detectives from Scotland Yard’s counter-terrorism command searched Bishop’s room in October 2018 they discovered fireworks as well as fuses, a remote control and igniter. He had also ordered a firing device.

He had placed virtual private network (VPN) apps on his phone to hide his online activity, which included researching explosive detonators and the target which was the Morden mosque.

Bishop, who had significant mental health problems, had stashed parts for making improvised incendiary devices at his mother’s home, hidden in a suitcase in the garden shed.

Bishop made notes detailing recipes and methods to make explosive substances.

The sentence was passed by Judge Lodder QC, who is experienced in similar cases.

In 2015 the same judge sentenced Trevor Mulindwa, an Islamist terrorist with mental health problems to six years for wanting to flee abroad. Mulwindwa, who had been treated in a mental health unit, had talked of being a suicide bomber, but had not bought bomb parts.

Sentencing Bishop, Lodder said: “The detonation of one or more of these fireworks at Morden mosque may have risked the lives of those nearby.”
“It is submitted that you are so far out of your depth that it is absurd and that the mosque was never truly in danger. In that context you are contrasted with a determined and dedicated terrorist. But terrorist acts are not limited to those who do not have similar vulnerabilities to you.”

He added: “The seriousness of the offending is reduced by your medical history, but I do not find that your condition at the time of offending was substantially reduced by mental disorder or learning disability.”

Prosecutor Dan Pawson-Pounds told the court: “Much as he never formed the final intent actually to carry out the act against the mosque at any particular point, he accepts that he carried out acts preparatory to it, and in contemplation of it.”

Bishop has had lifelong psychiatric disorders including paranoid schizophrenia, ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, a possible learning difficulty and also has experience of drug abuse. His 18 previous convictions include racially aggravated common assault.

Bishop’s barrister, Timothy Forte, denied his client’s action were fuelled by extremist rightwing beliefs. His web browsing history showed him viewing a pro-Brexit site and one instance of far-right material. Forte said he was moved by a victim of the Manchester attack, Saffie Roussos, aged 8: “It is only ever about Saffie. There is no expression of anti-Islamic feeling.”

“He’s not seeking to obtain a white Britain or a Muslim-free country. He was seeking in his non-functioning manner to exact revenge for the death of an eight-year-old girl and the crown can’t demonstrate an ideological cause.”

Bishop received benefits of around £1,200 a week and used the money to buy and consume drugs.

Bishop pleaded guilty to possession of an explosive substance with intent, in breach of the Explosives Act. The charge he admitted said that Bishop had by “29 October 2018, unlawfully and maliciously made or had in his possession or under his control an explosive substance with intent by means thereof to endanger life, or cause serious injury to property”. He received four years imprisonment for that charge, and an additional one year on licence because the offence was connected to terrorism.

Bishop also admitted an offence under section 58 of the Terrorism Act 2000. He accepted he had “made a record of information of a kind likely to be of use to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism”. He received two years for that count, to run at the same time as the explosives offence.

The Guardian

An investigation by the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command has led to the conviction of a man who was gathering together fireworks and other components to make an improvised incendiary device he was planning to use to target a mosque in south London.

Steven Bishop, 41 (28.11.77) of south London pleaded guilty at Kingston Crown Court on 8 April to possession of an explosive substance with intent, contrary to section 3 of the Explosive Substances Act 1883.

He previously pleaded guilty to collection or making a record of information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism, contrary to section 58 of the Terrorism Act (TACT) 2000. He is due to be sentenced on 10 April.

Bishop was arrested by Counter Terrorism detectives on Monday, 29 October 2018, at his address in south London. Officers attended the address after police were contacted by one of Bishop’s key workers when he showed her images of items he was collecting for the purpose, he said, to build ‘a bomb’, and told her that he was intending to target a mosque.

Commander Clarke Jarrett head of the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command said: “From our investigation it was clear Bishop stockpiled a quantity of fireworks and other component parts with the intention of creating a device that he was intending to use to target a mosque. Thanks to the diligence of his key worker in alerting us we were able to intervene before he could progress with his plans any further and crucially, nobody came to any harm.

“This example shows that information we get from the public really can help to protect the public and save lives. If you have any information about suspicious or terrorist activity, then please ACT and call police on 0800 728 321.

“Given Bishop was focussed upon a mosque, and in light of recent events in New Zealand, we also know that Muslim and other faith communities may be feeling particularly concerned and vulnerable. Specialist officers continue to provide support and protective security advice to mosques, and indeed all places of worship across the UK on how to best keep their buildings and visitors safe.”

After the concerns over Bishop were raised to police, officers initially attended his address and Bishop claimed he was just planning to let fireworks off at his mother’s address in south-west London. However, further enquiries were carried out and on 29 October 2018 Bishop was arrested at his mother’s home address. When detectives searched his address, they found several fireworks – some of which had been tampered with, as well as other equipment associated with making homemade incendiary devices, including fuses and remote control and ignitor. A firing device was also delivered to Bishop’s address two days after his arrest.

Officers identified that Bishop had bought a smartphone on 18 October 2018. The first searches made on the phone were for instructions on how to access the ‘dark web’ and he carried out research on how to conduct covert internet searches.

Further analysis of his device showed Bishop visited sites and viewed videos about the Manchester, London Bridge and Paris terrorist attacks. Detectives found a comment Bishop had posted on 24 October 2018 in relation to a video on Facebook about the victims of the Manchester Arena attack which ended with him saying: “don’t worry something bad is going to happen soon mark my words”.

Two ‘VPN’ apps were downloaded on to the phone – the apps are designed to hide which internet sites and online information the user has been accessing. However, when they opened one of the apps, officers found a page was still open, which showed Bishop had been researching further details on explosives detonators. Bishop had also carried out a number of online searches for Morden mosque.

Police searched Bishop’s mother’s address where they found wrapping that matched the fireworks at his home address. In the garden shed, detectives found a red suitcase inside which they found component parts which could be combined to create an improvised incendiary device.

Furthermore, detectives also found a number of hand-written notes by Bishop with detailed information on how to make various explosive substances, as well as information on how to access the dark web. The notes were deemed to be of use to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism.

After questioning and whilst further enquiries were being carried out, Bishop was charged a week after his arrest on 5 November 2018 and subsequently pleaded guilty to the offences above.

Following the guilty plea, Bishop was remanded in custody and is due to be sentenced on Wednesday, 10 April at Kingston Crown Court.

Met Police

Britain First supporter David Davis shouted ‘vile’ racist and religious abuse during a far-right demonstration.

The 22-year-old hurled the insults during the Burslem protest – which was organised by Stoke-on-Trent Infidels – and featured Britain First leaders Paul Golding and Jayda Fransen.

Magistrates at North Staffordshire Justice Centre heard he has already been prosecuted 13 months ago for assaulting a police officer during the October, 2017 demonstration.

But two further charges have now been brought following analysis of footage captured on police body-cams.

It recorded Davis shouting racial abuse at a group of Pakistani men and him also making a derogatory comment about the Muslim faith.

He pleaded guilty to a charge of intentional harassment, alarm or distress that was racially-aggravated, and a further charge of the same offence that was religiously-aggravated.

David Davis being arrested at the demo in 2017

David Davis being arrested at the demo in 2017

Scott Ashdown, representing Davis, said his client had already successfully undergone work with the probation service to address his behaviour.

He said: “There have been no further offences committed by Mr Davis since this occasion. If this had been prosecuted in a timely fashion with the other matter 13 months ago, he would still have received the community order he was given then.

“He did not attend this demonstration, he got caught up in it after he had been to watch Port Vale and was walking through the area.

“His words were said in response to a firework being thrown which exploded close to a woman and child. He is not a racist.”

Davis, of Alexandra Road, May Bank, has been handed a four-month prison sentence, suspended for 12 months, for the latest offences. That includes a 20-day rehabilitation activity requirement and a 42-day curfew which means he must stay in between 7pm and 7am.

District Judge Kevin Grego told Davis: “I don’t accept it was a complete accident that you were there. You shouted vile religious and vile racist abuse at people of Pakistani origin.

“You have been before the court nine times before for offences including racist assault, affray, battery and public order. That is the record of somebody who is a thoroughly unpleasant, unsociable racist.”

Davis must also pay £185 court costs and a £115 victim surcharge.

Stoke Sentinel

Steven Bishop changed his plea as his trial had been due to start

Steven Bishop changed his plea as his trial had been due to start


A man has admitted planning a bomb attack on a south London mosque.

Steven Bishop, 41, admitted buying fireworks and possessing instructions on how to make an explosive.

Bishop, of Thornton Heath, was believed to have been targeting Morden Mosque when his home was raided by police on 29 October last year.

He will be sentenced on Wednesday after changing his plea on the opening day of his trial at Kingston Crown Court.

He had originally been charged with preparing an act of terrorism, but prosecutors accepted a plea to a charge of possession of an explosive substance with intent to endanger life or property on Monday.

Bishop previously pleaded guilty to possession of information likely to be useful to a person preparing an act of terrorism, specifically a handwritten note on how to make explosives.

When he was arrested he told the police he wanted revenge for the death of eight-year-old Saffie Roussos who died in the Manchester Arena bombing in 2017.

The court heard Bishop has a history of mental health problems and a number of psychiatric reports had been prepared ahead of his trial.

He was remanded in custody until Wednesday,

BBC News

A dad hurled racist abuse at his child’s school teacher after they were injured in a playground accident, before returning to the school the next day armed with an axe, a court heard.

Stephen Cosgrove, 36, targeted the teacher, who is black, verbally attacking him with racist and homopohobic slurs after his child’s arm was broken.

The next day, on February 8, he turned up at the gates of Brownhills School in Walsall, West Midlands and continued his rant towards teachers while holding the terrifying weapon.

Stephen Cosgrove has been jailed for a year for racially abusing his child’s black teacher at school and turning up at the gates with an axe

Stephen Cosgrove has been jailed for a year for racially abusing his child’s black teacher at school and turning up at the gates with an axe

Unemployed Cosgrove, of Walsall, has been jailed for a year and handed a restraining order for the public order offences.

He has been ordered not to contact any employee of Brownhills School and not to go within 100 yards of the building.

n a victim impact statement, the teacher, who has not been named, said: ‘I am a black teacher and this is my fifth year in my teaching career.

‘I have never experienced extreme racial abuse, violent threatening behaviour and intimidating far right views from parents at school, as demonstrated by Cosgrove.

‘The constant thought of his threatening acts of violence has caused me to avoid going out publicly due to the overwhelming fear of being injured or assaulted, which has left me feeling vulnerable.’

PC Paul Watts, from West Midlands Police, said after the case: ‘Both the aggressive incidents were witnessed by students at the school, who heard the swearing and racist language.

‘What Cosgrove did was unacceptable and created fear for not only pupils, but the teachers who had to face him.

‘I am glad we have brought this man to justice and hope it can serve as an example that we will not tolerate this type of abuse in our community.’

Metro

Philip Kenny told his victim to ‘go back to the jungle’ before he hit him in the face with a glass

A thug told a doorman to “go back to the jungle” in a torrent of racial abuse before he hit him in the face with a glass.

Philip Kenny was jailed for six years after he was convicted of racially aggravated wounding with intent following the incident at Fountains in Llandudno .

The 42-year-old, of Charlton Street, Llandudno, had denied the charge but was convicted by a jury at Mold Crown Court on Friday afternoon.

Judge Niclas Parry told him: “You are clearly a violent and aggressive man and a danger to the public, including males and females.”

The judge said Kenny had used “vile racial abuse” in the cowardly attack which could be seen “as clear as day” on CCTV footage.

But he said he took into account that the defendant himself suffered serious injuries “by way of summary justice” at the bar.

Judge Parry said the sentence would have been one of five years, but an additional 12 months had been imposed to reflect the racial element of the offence.

The court heard the defendant had a number of previous convictions for violence, including racially aggravated offences, and had been jailed for robbery in 2004.

In 2007, he had received an indeterminate sentence for GBH upon his then girlfriend, which meant that he was effectively “on life licence” and had been recalled.

Prosecuting barrister Elen Owen said the victim was Sarjo Manneh, a British citizen who was black African by descent and had worked as a licensed doorman for about 13 years.

On April 14, 2018, he was working at Fountains and the defendant was there with a friend of his and the friend’s wife, having been out drinking since mid-afternoon.

Mr Manneh became aware of an argument between the couple inside the pub, and then went outside to man the entrance door.

He saw the defendant’s friend come outside with what appeared to be his wife’s handbag, which he placed on a table.

The defendant came out and both men were drinking from glasses which they brought outside with them.

The woman then came out, picked up the bag and walked away, shouting and swearing at her husband.

The court heard this appeared to make her husband angry, and he appeared to want to follow her.

Mr Manneh told him he could not leave with the glass, but the man told him that he couldn’t tell him what to do and racially abused him.

Kenny then joined in, saying “f*** you”, and used the N-word.

He told Mr Manneh: “You can’t f***ing come to my country and tell us what to do. Go back to the jungle.”

The defendant said the doorman should Google his name and that he was from Manchester.

When Mr Manneh said he wasn’t interested, the defendant’s response was another torrent of racial abuse, including reference to him being a cannibal.

Mr Manneh was holding a hot drink which he decided at that point to put down.

As he had his face turned away from the defendant, he felt what he described as a spark on the left side of his face, causing his vision to go blurry.

The defendant had used his glass to hit Mr Manneh, and he was then restrained by another doorman, said Miss Owen.

Kenny himself was badly injured during what followed and later made a complaint that he had been unlawfully assaulted, which was investigated but no charges were brought.

Mr Manneh returned to the bar and saw that he had cuts to his left cheek and his left ear.

Police officers went to the scene after CCTV operators informed them of an ongoing disturbance outside the bar.

On arrival, they were told the two men had left and that Mr Manneh had gone after them in the direction of Wetherspoons.

The officers saw Mr Manneh outside the pub and noticed cuts to his cheek and ear.

Shortly afterwards, the defendant and his friend were seen walking further down Madoc Street.

Kenny was arrested and taken to Ysbyty Glan Clwyd, where he was said to be extremely abusive to hospital staff and police.

He was described as “shaking with rage” and refused treatment, saying that he would spit in the face of anyone who tried to treat him.

During interview, he denied racially abusing Mr Manneh, and said he had thrown the contents of his glass at him but denied hitting him with the glass.

He said his recollection was affected by the head injury he sustained after the incident when he claimed he was assaulted by the complainant.

Defending barrister Martine Snowdon said that, following the conviction, Kenny had been recalled to prison because of the earlier indeterminate sentence and had served the equivalent of a 20-month sentence, which would not count against the sentence now to be imposed.

Daily Post