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After members of the neo-Nazi group National Action are jailed we look back at the racist member of right wing groups who was convicted of terrorism in Grimsby

He claimed to be a peaceful right wing activist in Grimsby who wanted to stand up for Britain’s “indigenous” people.

But loner Nathan Worrell was the secret neo-Nazi in Cromwell Street, a twisted racist who was trying to build bombs in his kitchen, inspired by a notorious nail bombing killer.

Even 10-years later, the trial of Worrell remains one of the most dramatic and truly horrifying cases that has been heard at Grimsby Crown Court.

And following the jailing of a cell of neo-Nazis and white supremacists last week for terrorism offences – including a couple who named their son Adolf – the similarities to the Worrell case are stark.

Both cases shone a light into the lives of right wing extremists and why anti-terrorism investigators now believe they hold as much of a threat as Islamist terrorist groups like ISIS.

At first, Worrell’s activities appeared to be limited to a vile campaign targeting a mixed race couple in the Willows Estate.

Officers were alerted after Worrell plastered stickers outside the home of a mother-of-one – branding her a “race-mixing slut”.

Flat full of Nazi literature

He focused his hate campaign on her and her husband, who was Bangladeshi born, and put stickers on the couple’s rear gate and on a lamp post near their home, reading: “Only inferior white women date outside their race. Be proud of your heritage. Don’t be a race-mixing slut.”

But, when police visited his flat in Cromwell Street, a much more worrying picture emerged that was to lead to a full blown terrorism investigation.

At first Worrell refused to let officers into his home but they forced their way in.

Inside, they discovered stacks of racist and neo-Nazi material, including five different types of sticker which had appeared outside the couple’s home in the Willows Estate.

Nathan Worrell was a member of a number of right-wing neo-Nazi groups and had expressed support for Soho killer David Copeland in items seized from his flat in Cromwell Road

Nathan Worrell was a member of a number of right-wing neo-Nazi groups and had expressed support for Soho killer David Copeland in items seized from his flat in Cromwell Road

But it was only then that the true horrific nature of what Worrell was doing became apparent.

There were numerous bomb-making manuals and the raw ingredients to make explosive devices. These included instructions on how to make detonators and what ingredients were needed for bombs.

He had bought fireworks and dozens of boxes of matches. What appeared to be an amateur attempt to make explosives actually used similar methods as neo-Nazi David Copeland, a right wing extremist who killed three people, including a pregnant woman, in a series of nail bomb attacks in London in 1999.

In fact among hundreds of Nazi pamphlets, leaflets, stickers and books was one with a chilling reference to the Soho killer. ‘Stand by Dave Copeland’, it said. ‘Leaderless resistance works. Combat 18 in the area!’

Shortly before Worrell’s arrest, the High Court in London ruled that Copeland should remain in prison for at least 50 years, ruling out his release until 2049 at the earliest, when he would be 73.

Worrell’s hoard of far-right material also included references to Adolf Hitler, the Nazi Party and the Ku Klux Klan. Extremist groups represented included Combat 18, with the 18 derived from Adolf Hitler’s initials. Other leaflets and flyers mentioned ‘Cleethorpes Combat 18’.

It was later discovered Worrell had also been a member of right-wing groups, the White Nationalist Party, the British People’s Party, the National Front, the Ku Klux Klan and the British National Party. Like Copeland, a fascination with Nazi and right wing ideology had progressed to actively becoming involved with the groups and then researching home made explosive devices and detonators.

Experts told the trial Worrell’s experiments included dismantling the fireworks in a way which could be used to build explosive devices and police suspected he had been starting to assemble a crude pipe bomb in a coffee jar when he was caught.

During the trial, Worrell denied possessing articles for terrorism purposes, including documents for making explosives and incendiary devices, 171 match heads, a large quantity of matches, several tubs of sodium chlorate, fireworks containing black powder, and containers of lighter fluid.

He also denied a racially aggravated public order offence by displaying racist stickers with intent to cause the mixed-race couple harassment, alarm or distress.

The court heard that he held “far-right political views”. When interviewed by police, he described himself as a white nationalist. He said he believed that this country belonged exclusively to white people – and that he was fighting for this country in a peaceful manner.

References to nail bomber David Copeland were found in Nathan Worrell's flat in Grimsby

References to nail bomber David Copeland were found in Nathan Worrell’s flat in Grimsby

But the prosecution claimed: “He was not merely a peaceful right-wing activist. He had more sinister, violent intentions.

“The very nature of the sticker campaign shows this defendant was not merely a collector of extreme right-wing items, but was active in taking steps to promote his ideology.

“He was plainly targeting ethnic minorities as part of his extreme right-wing views,” the prosecution claimed.

Heil Hitler texts

He had far-right political pamphlets and books – much of it Nazi – in his flat and he signed off text messages with “88”, a code for Heil Hitler. “He is undoubtedly a racist who follows the political views of the National Socialist or Nazi Party,” said the prosecution.

There were books giving two recipes for ‘how to make explosives’ and information on how to buy ordinary products which could be used. He had a large number of fireworks, some of which had been tampered with in order to remove the gun powder.

Other books in Worrell’s bedroom covered subjects including murder, contract killers and hit men, arson as a means of attack, guerrilla warfare, leaderless resistance and more references to nail bomber Copeland.

Worrell sent racist text messages to a friend in reaction to watching two television programmes, Crimewatch, and a documentary featuring David Baddiel about compensation owed to the Jewish Community following the Second World War.

He also had a Death’s Head as the wallpaper on one of his three mobile phones. He told police he supported Combat 18 “in terms of some of their policies”, but did not believe in taking violent action. He denied ever specifically ordering material from Combat 18. Some stickers he had, but claimed not to have ordered, referred to a “Cleethorpes Combat 18”.

He admitted distributing stickers for far-right political groups, sticking them on lamp posts and junction boxes around Grimsby. When asked what he thought the effect of such stickers would be on any minority groups living in the area, he said: “I don’t know. I don’t associate with them.”

One text included an image of Adolf Hitler with a halo round him and another attacked the country’s immigration policies and called Britain a “cesspit for scum”.

Just a sad loner, claimed defence

The defence portrayed Worrell as a “slightly sad loner” who had long standing far-right wing beliefs but could not even drive or afford to go to rallies and meetings.

They claimed his activism was limited to “leafleting” and denied there was any bomb plot.

Grimsby Crown Court heard Nathan Worrell had been trying to assemble bombs using gunpowder from fireworks, pictured here, and chemicals in the same way as Soho nail bomber David Copeland

Grimsby Crown Court heard Nathan Worrell had been trying to assemble bombs using gunpowder from fireworks, pictured here, and chemicals in the same way as Soho nail bomber David Copeland

“He is not a terrorist,” claimed the defence, which branded the prosecution case “completely over the top” and accused it of throwing“ everything, including the kitchen sink” at the case.

Worrell did not give evidence at his trial and in January 2008 he was convicted by the jury in less than four hours.

He was jailed for seven years and three months. It included six years for the terrorist offence, with a consecutive 15 months for the racist public order offence.

Judge John Reddihough told Worrell: “Perhaps the least I say about the extreme views you hold and the way we saw you express them in the documents and other items before the court, the better.

“Maybe the citizens of this country are entitled to hold such views but what they are not entitled to do is embark on criminal offences in furtherance of those extreme views.”

He told Worrell: “You were in possession of a large number of instruction manuals for making explosive and other devices that could be used to harm innocent people.

“You were in possession of other items which appeared to advocate the use of violence to promote the extreme right-wing views you held.

“Courts in this country must make it clear that terrorism, in any form, will not be tolerated.

“Any offence which involves any step towards terrorist acts must be firmly punished.”

Right win extremist Nathan Worrell who was convicted of terrorism offences in Grimsby

Right win extremist Nathan Worrell who was convicted of terrorism offences in Grimsby

After the case, it emerged that Worrell was born in Cleethorpes and grew up in Grimsby with his mother and sister. The last school he attended was Havelock School, Grimsby, and he was believed to have worked for a warehouse in the town as a packer. He also had a job picking cabbages.

At the time of his arrest, he was unemployed and was not believed to have held any long-term employment since leaving school.

After the sentencing, the husband targeted by Worrell’s racist leaflets said: “It is not long enough. He will be out in three or four years. He will probably come out and still hold the same racist beliefs.”

Worrell appealed against his sentence which was rejected.

It is thought Worrell was released in 2011 and his whereabouts are currently unknown.

Grimsby Telegraph

A racist yob who performed a Nazi salute at a Manchester rally against antisemitism has been jailed.

Hundreds of people, including MPs and the UK’s chief Rabbi, were among those taking part in the demonstration in the city centre in September.

However, a court heard Joseph Brogan, 27, performed the ‘outrageous and provocative’ gesture in front of them as well as shouting antisemitic tropes.

He claimed he was ‘just expressing his views about Zionism’ but has now been jailed for six months by a judge who said racism of this kind needed to be ‘nipped in the bud.’

Those taking part in the rally were stood in Cathedral Gardens when Brogan approached them, William Donnelly, prosecuting said.

He was heard to shout ‘child killers’ and ‘you people don’t live in Israel.’

“That was then accompanied by him making the Nazi salute, with his extended arm as he walked past and made those comments,” Mr Donnelly said.

He was seen by two security staff who quickly alerted police and he was apprehended at the scene, as captured by the M.E.N’s photographer.

In his police interview he said he was just ‘expressing his view on Zionism’ and that they were ‘just his opinions’ and that he had freedom of speech, Mr Donnelly added.

He said he didn’t remember making the gesture and that if he did he must have done ‘in the heat of the moment.’

However Shirlie Duckworth, defending, said he now accepted that his freedom of speech ‘was not his absolute right’ and that he had caused upset and offence.

She said: “He didn’t attend that rally with the sole aim of causing that offence.

“He was in the city centre and having seen the rally decided to express his opinions on zionism.

“He was now accepts, by way of his plea, his freedom of speech is not an absolute right and that his behaviour caused people harassment, alarm or distress.

“These people were not attending a Zionist rally but an antisemitism rally.

“His actions were not pre-planned, they were impulsive, and although significant were limited in effect as he was quickly dealt with by the police.”

She added he was a high-valued employee at a catering firm and a reference was read by his mum who said ‘you couldn’t ask for a better son’ as he was helping her support his dad, who has bladder cancer.

Brogan, of Lees Street, Gorton pleaded guilty at the magistrates court to a racially aggravated public order offence.

He already has two other convictions for similar offences, the court was told.

And sending him to prison for six months Judge Martin Rudland said a message needed to be sent that, especially in the current climate, behaviour like this wouldn’t be tolerated.

Passing sentence at Manchester Crown Court he said: “This was targeted specifically at members of the Jewish community at a rally which was lawfully convened in this city.

“Antisemitism is an issue currently for those in authority, not only those in charge of law and order but those in charge of political parties.

“This country has a proud history of tolerance and harmony, and by and large we are good at it.

“There have been difficult times for some minorities and these are difficult times for members of the Jewish community, who have a long and fine tradition of contributing to the fabric of this city.

“What you did was express views which are highly offensive and which you must have known were highly offensive.

“Resorting to the Nazi salute which is an extremely provocative gesture and which has no place in our society, to a community who were peacefully demonstrating, is something the courts must take extremely seriously. It was outrageous.”

“This kind of behaviour must be nipped in the bud.”

Manchester Evening News

A North Tyneside man who racially abused a train guard after refusing to pay his fare has been fined.

Sean Thomas McCurry, 39, of Harlow Avenue, Backworth, pleaded guilty to fare evasion and racially abusing the guard at Penrith station on Friday, January 12.

He was fined £160 by Carlisle magistrates and ordered to pay £115.90 in compensation, a victim surcharge of £30 and costs of £400.

The court heard how McCurry had boarded the late-running Trans Pennine service to Manchester Piccadilly at Penrith and sat in the first class carriage.

Shortly afterwards the guard began a routine ticket inspection. When he approached McCurry, he told him that he didn’t have a ticket and would not be buying one as the train was late. The guard repeatedly told him that he must buy a ticket but McCurry refused.

When McCurry left the train at Penrith, the guard told him that he would not be permitted to travel on any services he was working on in the future because he had refused to pay for his journey. McCurry responded with an expletive-filled racial slur.

The incident was reported to police and McCurry was arrested for fare evasion and a religiously-aggravated public order offence.

In police interview, McCurry boasted of his support for the British National Party and told of his hatred of Muslims.

Investigating officer PC Stuart Bingham said: “This was a loathsome verbal attack on someone who was just doing their job. Any abuse of this nature will not be tolerated whether directed at a member of the public or rail staff. Hate crime is not acceptable in any form.

“Despite everyone else on the service paying for a ticket, McCurry thought he was entitled to free travel – something he will now regret given he must fork out more than £700, a considerably larger sum than the original fare.”

Adam Swallow, British Transport Police liaison manager for TransPennine Express, said: “Any form of hate crime is totally unacceptable and instances of abuse towards our staff will not be tolerated. Everyone that travels by train should have a valid ticket or pass.

“We continue to work with the British Transport Police to ensure our colleagues and customers are safe and secure.”

News Guardian

James Forrest, aged 22, of Tilbury Grove, Leeds.

James Forrest, aged 22, of Tilbury Grove, Leeds.

A man who head-butted a British Transport Police (BTP) officer before racially abusing another official while drunk at Leeds Station during a Bank Holiday weekend has been jailed.

James Forrest, aged 22, of Tilbury Grove, Leeds, appeared before a West Yorkshire Magistrates’ court on October 5 and was handed an 18-week prison sentence.

Forrest was highly intoxicated at Leeds railway station and was acting in a highly anti-social manner shortly after 11pm on August 31.

A BTP officer on patrol at the station then approached Forrest and told him to leave.

But the defendant became aggressive and verbally abusive, calling officers “rats” and other derogatory terms.

As Forrest was being arrested for being drunk and disorderly, he then attacked the BTP officer by head-butting him.

When more officers were called to assist, Forrest “unleashed a torrent of verbal and racist abuse both at the station and at custody,” according to BTP.

He was caught on a body camera saying “I am racist and proud”, the force added.

Forrest pleaded guilty after he was charged with being drunk and disorderly, assaulting a constable in the execution of their duty, a racially aggravated public order offence and for failing to return from police bail.

As part of his sentence, Forrest was also ordered to pay a £115 victim surcharge.

Sergeant James Finch from BTP, said: “Forrest’s behaviour and language was completely disgusting and I am pleased the judge handed him a prison sentence. Not only did he racially abuse some of my officers, he also assaulted one of them by violently head-butting him.

“Thanks to the overwhelming evidence against Forrest, including body-worn footage, he was forced to plead guilty to the four charges.”

Yorkshire Post

A man who smashed his former partner’s head against a coffee table and punched her more than 20 times has been locked up for ten years.

Jonathan Youthed, 31 of Hungarton Court, Peterborough, turned up at the woman’s house covered in blood and bragging about having assaulted another man on 25 March this year.

Earlier that day, Youthed had texted his ex-partner asking what she was doing later but it was obvious from his messages that he was drunk, Peterborough Crown Court heard.

Youthed then turned up at her house at about 10pm, but an argument began after he told her he had attacked another man.

The woman asked him to leave – but he refused, sitting on the sofa.

His victim tried to make him move – which is when he then launched the brutal attack, smashing her head against the table, an aquarium and other furniture.

The assault left the woman thinking she was going to be killed – and was only stopped when her teenage son kicked Youthed in the head.

Neighbours called 999 after hearing the victim screaming during the attack – and she was described as looking like something out of a horror film by neighbours when she left the house, because of the bruising she had suffered.

When he was arrested, Youthed made racially offensive comments to a police officer.

Today (Friday) he sat head bowed in the dock has he was jailed for ten years by Judge Sean Enright.

Judge Enright said it was a ‘sustained assault’ lasting several minutes, and said: “Her breath was being squeezed out of chest and she thought she was going to die.

“There was sustained bruising and some bleeding. Part of her hair had been torn out.”

The court also heard how he had also attacked a previous partner a number of years ago.

Youthed was charged with attempted murder and wounding with intent, and denied both charges. He was convicted of wounding with intent but cleared of the more serious charge at a trial earlier this year.

He was also convicted of making threats to kill, and causing racially aggravated alarm or distress.

In a statement read to the court, the victim said three months after the attack she had only left the house twice, and described herself as a ‘recluse’ because she felt she could not trust anyone anymore.

She said: “I truly felt he was going to kill me that night. I want him to be punished.”

Emma Rance, defending, said Youthed had shown remorse. She said: “He says if there was any way he could make amends, he would.

“He clearly needs some help, and hopes to get that in custody.”

DC Tania Weston said: “This was an horrific attack, which was only stopped because the victim’s son showed incredible bravery.

“I hope this prison sentence brings the victim some closure and helps her to move on with her life as best she can.

“I also want to thank her and all the other witnesses for having the strength to give evidence during the course of the trial.”

Youthed was given an eight year sentence for wounding with intent, two years for making threats to kill, to be served consecutively, and four months for causing racially aggravated alarm or distress, to be served concurrently.

Peterborough Today

Glynn Fairclough was jailed for 12 weeks during a hearing held at Sheffield Magistrates' Court held today, after he admitted to racially aggravated harassment against his neighbour

Glynn Fairclough was jailed for 12 weeks during a hearing held at Sheffield Magistrates’ Court held today, after he admitted to racially aggravated harassment against his neighbour

A Sheffield man, who tormented his neighbour by making monkey noises and displaying racist signs and dolls, has been put behind bars.

During this period, Fairclough, of Retford Road, Handsworth displayed signs that used racist language and a golly doll in a landing window that faced her house.

“There was clear planning. The defendant actually went out and bought a golly doll and intentionally placed it in his window,” said Kate Reikstina, prosecuting.

Ms Reikstina described how Fairclough, 52, also made monkey noises at the woman and left onions and rotting shrimp strewn all over her property.

She said police warned Fairclough to stop, thereby informing him of the ‘distress’ being caused to his neighbour, but he persisted in his abusive behaviour.

He was finally arrested by South Yorkshire Police on August 26.

In a victim personal statement read out in court, the woman described how Fairclough’s behaviour had caused her a great deal of stress and anxiety.

“It makes me worried to leave the house and I don’t want to go into the garden. I’ve even considered moving,” said the woman.

The court heard how Fairclough was jailed in 2011 for the harassment of his ex-wife.

He pleaded guilty to a charge of racially aggravated harassment without violence at a hearing held last month.

Joanne Robinson, defending, said: “He was cooperative with the police…he accepted a very large degree of what happened.

“He accepts that the language he used was unacceptable.”

She added: “What he would say is that most of these incidents happened while he was under the influence of alcohol.”

Ms Robinson told the court that Fairclough was in the process of moving into his girlfriend’s home in Bramley, and would therefore soon be living a ‘sizeable’ distance away from the complainant.

District Judge Paul Heeley jailed Fairclough for 12 weeks during this morning’s hearing.

“Your behaviour was deeply shocking and distressing. It’s appalling conduct, in my view,” said Judge Heeley, adding: “Your neighbour has a right to be treated with respect in her own home and to live her life in peace.”

Judge Heeley also granted a restraining order, banning Fairclough from contacting the complainant.

He said: “I must make it abundantly clear: if you display any signs aimed at the defendant I will treat that as conduct which puts you in breach of the restraining order.”

Judge Heeley said he was minded to order Fairclough to pay his victim compensation, but Ms Riekstina said the woman had not put in a claim for it.

Yorkshire Post.

A 79-year-old election candidate who called for ‘new and better death camps’ and likened Jews and immigrants to termites has been jailed.

Barbara Fielding-Morriss, whose manifesto praised Adolf Hitler, was given a 12-month prison sentence after a judge condemned her lack of remorse for the ‘vile’ offences.

Fielding-Morriss, who stood as a candidate in Stoke-on-Trent Central during last year’s by-election and general election, was convicted in June of three offences of stirring up racial hatred between September 2016 and February last year at Stafford Crown Court.

Passing sentence, Recorder Julian Taylor said Fielding-Morriss, who represented herself in court, had ‘not helped her cause’ by offering anti-Semitic mitigation.

he pensioner, who accused the judge of curtailing her freedom of speech, submitted three written statements to the court and in the witness box claimed she was protecting ‘my white nation’ from ‘annihilation’ by immigrants.

After saying she believed an ‘infestation’ of Jews had invaded Britain, Fielding-Morriss returned to the dock and was told she would serve six months of her one-year prison term in custody, and the remainder on licence. Recorder Taylor told Fielding-Morriss: ‘The background to this case is that you stood as a parliamentary candidate. ‘Your manifesto, which was published on a website and in a blog, contained material that formed the subject of the three counts on the indictment.

‘What I found particularly sinister during the trial was your attitude. You showed no remorse whatsoever. ‘Indeed even today, when I gave you a final opportunity to address me, you started to repeat some of the matters you put forward to the jury during your trial.’

The judge added: ‘The fact of the matter is you intended to stir up racial hatred. ‘The fact you were standing in a general election as a parliamentary candidate aggravates this case, because you were putting views forward to an electorate.’ The judge said the defendant’s age was not of itself a barrier to imprisonment, adding: ‘This matter is so serious that it crosses the custody threshold – an immediate sentence of custody is appropriate.’

Metro