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MEMBERS of a biker gang kicked a man in the face after attacking him in a town centre pub and brandished a knife at customers who tried to come to his aid.

Michael Mckeon and Andrew Stevenson dragged their victim from Porters Ale House before beating him up in an early hours ‘drink and drug fuelled’ attack, Liverpool Crown Court heard on Friday, July 6.

The pair, members of biker gang the Sons of Hell, were drinking in the Buttermarket Street pub at around 2.30am on Saturday, January 27, when Chris Forshaw became involved in a dispute at the bar.

Mr Forshaw claimed that he had dropped some money and was bending down to pick it up, but a female customer accused him of attempting to steal her cash.

He was then dragged outside to the smoking area at the rear of the pub by Mckeon and Stevenson, who were wearing Sons of Hell branded jackets – with CCTV of the ensuing ‘totally unprovoked and unnecessary’ attack played in court.

Mckeon, of West Avenue in Stockton Heath, pushed Mr Forshaw to the floor and kicked him in the face before punching him.

Stevenson, of Lovely Lane in Whitecross, pointed a knife at customers who attempted to come to Mr Forshaw’s aid and elbowed him in the face and chest.

The 34-year-old was also seen taking hold of another unidentified victim by the throat.

Mr Forshaw suffered bruising and bleeding to his eyes after the assault.

On Friday, recorder Stephen Riordan sentenced Stevenson to two years and nine months behind bars but spared Mckeon from serving time in jail after the pair admitted actual bodily harm.

Stevenson also admitted possession of a bladed article and breaching a suspended sentence handed to him for affray in 2016.

The court heard that the Northwest Spartans Ltd business owned by Stevenson, who has 14 previous convictions for 36 offences, which employs six people would fold if he was jailed.

He claimed he had branded a bevel edged work tool in the pub rather than a knife.

Barrister Desmond Lennon, representing Mckeon, told the court that his client had served in the Royal Engineers between 2008 and 2012.

The 28-year-old, who has one previous conviction for being drunk and disorderly, was employed as a welder before being made redundant eight months ago.

He has since trained to work in the security industry.

Mckeon was given a 15-month jail sentence suspended for two years, handed a rehabilitation activity requirement of up to 30 days and ordered to complete 120 hours unpaid work.

Sentencing, recorder Riordan said: “This was a disgraceful incident of violence and a sustained assault.

“For little or no reason, the victim was removed from the bar and attacked by both of you.

“You continued to attack him when he was on the floor, and he received nasty injuries.

“There is one very significant difference between the two of you, a difference which must be reflected in the sentences I pass today.

“Mr Stevenson, you have a quite appalling criminal record while you Mr Mckeon are effectively of previous good character.

“There has to be some disparity in the sentences in this case.”

Warrington Guardian

A MAN who spray-painted swastikas around the city and set fire to buildings including a school and a church over the course of a month has pleaded guilty to all charges.

Austin Ross, 23, of Romney Close in Newport, pleaded guilty to 15 counts in total at a brief hearing in Cardiff Crown Court today.

The charges relate to a series of swastikas and racially aggravated graffiti and two arson attacks in Newport between May 2 and May 31 this year.

Two swastikas appeared on a wall and post at the University of South Wales building in Newport city centre during the late May bank holiday weekend.

Alongside one of the swastikas was a message apparently written in support of far right activist Tommy Robinson, real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, who co-founded the English Defence League.

Today, Ross admitted nine counts of causing racially aggravated damage to property.

He owned up to damaging the windows of the Riverfront Theatre in the city centre on May 3, the front door of the Bethel Baptist Church in Bassaleg and a school sign belonging to Maindee Primary School on May 4, as well as a footbridge belonging to Newport City Council on May 5.

Ross also targeted Maindee Primary school a second time on May 28, the Gwent Probation Service building on Lower Dock Street between May 27 and May 31, the University of South Wales Newport campus and the walls of the Masonic Hall on May 28.

Four other counts of racially aggravated harassment, alarm or distress were admitted by Ross between May 2 and May 5.

The charges read out in court noted his actions were based on the membership or perceived membership of a particular racial group.

He also admitted two counts of arson, setting fire to the front doors and hallway of the Masonic Hall in Lower Dock Street on May 28 and destroying a classroom at Bassaleg secondary school on May 29.

Judge Eleri Rees, addressing Ross’ legal representative Harry Baker, warned that the defendant was “not helping himself” by refusing to cooperate, and added she would order a psychiatric assessment before sentencing.

“A more sinister interpretation can be put on his behaviour because he has not explained his actions,” said Judge Rees.

“It does make it difficult for anybody to second guess that there might be a background that could help explain this.

“He doesn’t help himself in that way.

“I’m going to order a psychiatric assessment and we will set up a time table for sentencing.”

Addressing the defendant, Judge Rees added: “I would encourage you to try to cooperate and reflect upon what could be of assistance to you.”

Ross will now appear in court on August 21 for sentencing.

South Wales Argus.

After a five-year trial, a member of a neo-Nazi gang has been found guilty of 10 racially-motivated murders.

Beate Zschäpe was at the centre of one of the longest trials in modern German history

Beate Zschäpe was at the centre of one of the longest trials in modern German history

Beate Zschäpe was the main defendant on trial over the murder of eight ethnic Turks, a Greek citizen and a policewoman between 2000 and 2007.

The verdict carries an automatic life sentence.

The connection between the murders was only discovered by chance in 2011, after a botched robbery led to the neo-Nazi group’s discovery.

Zschäpe shared a flat in the eastern town of Zwickau with two men, who died in an apparent suicide pact. The bodies of Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Böhnhardt were found in a burnt-out caravan used in the robbery.

Zschäpe, Mundlos and Böhnhardt had formed a cell called the National Socialist Underground (NSU). An explosion at their home – apparently in an attempt to destroy evidence – led to Zschäpe turning herself in.

The NSU’s seven-year campaign exposed serious shortcomings in the German state’s monitoring of neo-Nazis, and led to a public inquiry into how German police failed to discover the murder plot.

Four other defendants were also given jail terms for their role in helping the NSU gang:

Ralf Wohlleben, a former official of the far-right National Democratic Party (NPD), was sentenced to 10 years for procuring the Ceska pistol with silencer used in nine murders. He was convicted of aiding and abetting murder.

Carsten S was given three years of juvenile detention. He is believed to have been a key contact for the Zwickau cell during their secret life, and was found guilty of handing the gang the Ceska pistol and silencer

André E was given two years and six months for helping a terrorist group. He had visited the Zwickau trio often, sometimes with his children, helping to give the neo-Nazis an air of normality.

Holger G received three years for giving his birth certificate and other ID to Uwe Mundlos, to protect him from the police.
BBC News

A man who headbutted a former serviceman in the face after he tried to intervene in an argument between him and a former partner has been jailed for 32 months.

Daniel Sparham, who has been jailed for two-and-a-half years after he headbutted his neighbour so hard he broke a bone Picture: SUFFOLK CONSTABULARY

Daniel Sparham, who has been jailed for two-and-a-half years after he headbutted his neighbour so hard he broke a bone Picture: SUFFOLK CONSTABULARY

Daniel Sparham’s attack on William Stevely – who was in the RAF and had also worked for Norfolk police for seven years – led to the victim suffering a fracture to a bone in his face, Ipswich Crown Court heard.

Marc Brown, prosecuting, said Mr Stevely suffered from osteoporosis, which made him more vulnerable to suffering broken bones, and as a result of falling to the ground during the attack he also suffered two fractures to his pelvis.

The court heard Mr Stevely and Sparham lived in neighbouring flats in Burnham Way, Lowestoft, and on the evening in question Mr Stevely had been in bed in his flat at about 11.30pm when he heard a lot of noise coming from Sparham’s flat.

He heard a man and a woman shouting and shortly afterwards he heard three knocks on his front door.

The victim got out of bed and answered the door and could see a female lying on the grass outside his flat in the recovery position.

Mr Stevely went over to the woman and spoke to her and was calling the police when Sparham came out of his flat.

Sparham became aggressive and as Mr Stevely tried to defuse the situation he was headbutted on the side of the face by Sparham, causing him to fall to the ground, said Mr Brown.

He returned to his flat and was subsequently arrested by police.

Mr Brown said that earlier in the evening there had been an argument between Sparham and his former partner during which he had called the police and officers had taken her to a friend’s house.

She had returned to Sparham’s flat and there had been a second argument during which Mr Stevely was attacked.

Sparham, 34, admitted inflicting grievous bodily harm on Mr Stevely in May last year.

Jailing him for 32 months, Judge John Devaux said Mr Stevely was more vulnerable than was obvious to Sparham because of his osteoporosis.

Matthew McNiff, for Sparham, said his client felt genuine remorse for what happened to Mr Stevely.

He said despite a bad record Sparham had made positive changes to his life and was in employment.

Eastern Daily Press

A THUG with ‘entrenched racist views’ has been jailed for lashing out at a colleague just after he was sacked for months of ‘bullying and intimidation’.

Portsmouth Crown Court heard Charlie Jeans, 23, pictured right, used a racial slur towards his colleague and answered the work phone to his boss saying ‘white boys’ only’

Charlie Jeans, 23, of Thruxton Road, Havant, was jailed for 10 months at Portsmouth Crown Court for a racist attack

Charlie Jeans, 23, of Thruxton Road, Havant, was jailed for 10 months at Portsmouth Crown Court for a racist attack

A shocked line manager at his work, Havant Borough Council contractor Norse South East, reported the racism and Jeans was sacked. But the dad-of-two, of Thruxton Road, Havant, ‘lost control’ when he saw the target of his racist abuse sitting in a works van with a colleague near the depot – and smashed the vehicle with a baton.

Judge Jane Rowley said: ‘This was an incident which was ugly where you deliberately approached the (victim)’s vehicle, you called him racist abusive names which I do not care to repeat. ‘You returned to your vehicle to arm yourself with a weapon – a foot-long cosh. You set about causing maximum damage to his vehicle.’ Shards of glass flew from smashed windows of the van at the two occupants during the incident on November 22 in Southmore Lane, Havant.

Jailing him for 10 months, the judge said: ‘A clear message needs to go out to people like you who harbour such views. ‘Your views will not be tolerated in 21st century multicultural Britain where our successes as a country have been forged by the endeavours of people of many cultures, races and religions.’

Jeans, who has 18 convictions for 32 offences, was charged with having an offensive weapon, racially-aggravated common assault, assault, racially-aggravated criminal damage, criminal damage and racially-aggravated causing fear of violence. ‘I see this behaviour at the highest level of racism. There can be no excuses for your actions,’ the judge said.

Jeans admitted the racist offences only on the second day of his trial in May, after two people from the company had given evidence. The judge added: ‘You chanced your arm in this case, you had an expectation that you were living on borrowed time, that quite possibly work friends or colleagues would not turn up to give evidence – witness summonses had to be issued. ‘When they did the decent thing it was clear to me that they were significantly embarrassed by your racism and bullying, intimidating behaviour towards the victim over the many months leading up to you losing your control and smashing up his vehicle and causing him great fear when you assaulted him in November 2017.’

Damian Haye, for unemployed Jeans, said: ‘This should be treated as an isolated incident, reflecting the loss of control and not a return to former ways.’

Portsmouth News

Andrew Emery, of Bentilee, ‘let his fingers run away with him’ on day of the Ariana Grande One Love tribute concert

Drunken Andrew Emery has been jailed after he made public posts on Facebook calling for ‘mosques to be burned’ in the aftermath of the Manchester bombing.

The 45-year-old dad ‘let his fingers run away with him’ on the day of the One Love tribute concert organised by singer Ariana Grande last summer.

He posted, ‘It is time we started to fight back. The Government won’t do **** because of the PC brigade. Every time we have a terrorist attack we should burn a mosque’.

Three hours later he posted, ‘To all the British murderers and serial killers out there, do us all a favour and concentrate on the Muslim community’.

A further post read, ‘Burn a mosque today and feel better’.

His posts could be read by the wider public and he was arrested after a complaint was made to Humberside Police.

Andrew Emery was jailed after admitting stirring up religious hatred on Facebook

Andrew Emery was jailed after admitting stirring up religious hatred on Facebook

Now Emery has been jailed for two years at Stoke-on-Trent Crown Court.

Prosecutor Harpreet Sandhu said the comments came on June 4 last year, the day of a tribute concert following the Manchester MEN Arena bombing on May 22 in which 22 concert-goers were killed.

Mr Sandhu said: “The defendant posted, ‘It is time we started to fight back. The Government won’t do **** because of the PC brigade. Every time we have a terrorist attack we should burn a mosque, preferably when it is full’.

“Three hours later the defendant posted, ‘To all the British murderers and serial killers out there, ‘Do us all a favour and concentrate on the Muslim community’.

“He later posted in capital letters, ‘Burn a mosque today and feel better’.”

Mr Sandhu said the defendant’s posts were not confined to his 157 Facebook friends and could be seen by the wider public. The posts led to a member of the public contacting Humberside Police on June 4.

Mr Sandhu added that the posts were not isolated and Emery had made comments on previous dates including, ‘Trump had the right idea trying to stop Muslims entering his country. Maybe we should do it so we would only have to worry about the scum already here’.

The defendant told police he had posted ‘stupid comments’ on Facebook. He added he was not a racist.

Emery, of Aylesbury Road, Bentilee, pleaded guilty to three charges of publishing or distributing written material intending to stir up religious hatred.

Brian Williams, mitigating, conceded the defendant’s comments were ‘abhorrent’.

He said Emery is a hard-working family man and has a teenage daughter who is an Ariana Grande fan.

Mr Williams said: “She wanted to go to the concert but they could not afford to send her.

“At the time he drank too much and his father had just been diagnosed as terminally ill. These offences post date the terrible explosion in Manchester and there was the added factor his daughter could have been there.

“Without thinking rationally he allowed these appalling comments to pour out. He would not have gone in a pub or stood on a street corner and said such things.

“His fingers ran away with him. They were faster than his brain.”

Recorder John Butterfield QC told Emery his posts did a great disservice to those injured and killed in the arena bombing.

He said the defendant’s previous posts demonstrated that the three charges he pleaded guilty to were not isolated or uncharacteristic.

Recorder Butterfield QC said the offences were aggravated by the fact the posts advocated fatal violence, they were widely available to the public and they occurred at such a sensitive time.

He added: “They were hot on the heels of the London Bridge/Borough Market incident on June 3, the day before the tribute concert.”

Stoke Sentinel

A RACIST who once tried to evade justice by fleeing to America has been jailed for nine months for a hate crime against his neighbour.

Judge Paul Worsley QC told Simon Guy Sheppard, who has several convictions for hate crimes, he had expressed such ‘vitriolic’ and racially aggravated views that he merited the sentence.

The judge also imposed a five-year Criminal Behaviour Order to try to prevent the council tenant repeating such comments.

Sheppard, 61, of Cockrett Court, Selby, had told a jury at York Crown Court he was unhappy that a black man had been allocated a flat in his block of flats.

He said he had “barracked” a Sky engineer working on a satellite dish at the neighbour’s flat about the neighbour’s conduct on June 16, 2017, and used a racist word to describe the neighbour ‘because I was being as nasty as I could be.’

He denied intending the neighbour to overhear, using the same word with a swear word to describe his neighbour and running a hate campaign of racist taunts and actions.

The jury convicted him of using racially aggravated words to the engineer but acquitted him of a two-year racial harassment campaign. Sheppard had denied both charges.

His barrister Stephen Grattage said in mitigation that Sheppard had not offended for a protracted period of time and had medical difficulties.

Opening the prosecution, Martin Robertshaw alleged Sheppard persistently used the racist word whenever he saw the neighbour and matters came to a head on June 16.

Giving evidence, Sheppard agreed with Mr Robertshaw the only objection he had against the neighbour was that he was black and not British, adding he “had ‘taken over a white man’s wife.’

He objected to the “taboo” on using the racist word, claimed being called a “racist” was worse and alleged the “system was completely geared” in favour of black people.

Sheppard was convicted last year of a hate crime by complaining to a Selby council officer that the authority was “fly tipping” by “dumping Africans all over”

In 2008, Sheppard claimed asylum in the USA under freedom of speech law when he skipped bail partway through a trial at Leeds Crown Court for publishing racially inflammatory material.

His asylum bid failed and he was deported back to the UK, where he had been convicted in his absence, and was jailed for nearly four years.

York Press