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Mark Grogan had been drinking and admitted giving son a “good hiding”

A father has been given a suspended jail sentence after he assaulted his son with a baseball bat and threatened him with a machete.

Leeds Crown Court heard Mark Grogan had been out earlier drinking with his son Alex without any problem on January 15.

His son and a friend had returned with Grogan to his flat in Dewsbury where the drinking continued until the early hours. After the friend left both men fell asleep.

Bashir Ahmed, prosecuting, said the problems began when Grogan woke up and realised two treasured air rifles had gone and blamed his son or the son’s friend.

That led to an argument which culminated in Grogan pinning his son against a wall. He managed to get free and said he was leaving.

He had brought his dog with him and put it on the lead but as they were going Grogan partly shut the door trapping the dog’s paw. His son told him to leave the dog alone but Grogan then picked up the baseball bat and began to hit his son with it in the hall.

“At one point he hit him on the left leg causing him to fall over in pain,” said Mr Ahmed. He was also shouting: “I’m going to sort you out good and proper.”

His victim was struck again until he was crying and crawling on the floor towards the door only to be dragged back by Grogan.

He only managed to get away when his father went into the living room and as he got out saw Grogan was behind him waving a machete shouting: “When I get my hands on you I’m going to kill you.”

Alex Grogan, 20 at the time, managed to ring a relative for help and the police. When his father was arrested and interviewed he accepted giving his son “a good hiding, I just flipped.” He said if he had been sober it would never have happened.

Anastasis Tassou, representing Grogan, said his client had been drinking and he was upset about the air rifles but accepted he should have handled things differently. It was an isolated incident but the result had been a split in the family.

Grogan, 45 of Alexandra Crescent, Dewsbury, admitted assault causing actual bodily harm and threatening with an offensive weapon. He was given a total of 21 months in prison suspended for two years with 175 hours unpaid work and ordered to pay £300 compensation to his son.

Judge Mushtaq Khokhar said it was only his good fortune his son had not suffered even more serious injuries. But if Grogan was jailed immediately and lost his flat and job as a result it could only cause more problems.
Huddersfield Examiner

From 2016

A THUG with ‘entrenched racist views’ has been jailed for lashing out at a colleague just after he was sacked for months of ‘bullying and intimidation’.

Portsmouth Crown Court heard Charlie Jeans, 23, pictured right, used a racial slur towards his colleague and answered the work phone to his boss saying ‘white boys’ only’

Charlie Jeans, 23, of Thruxton Road, Havant, was jailed for 10 months at Portsmouth Crown Court for a racist attack

Charlie Jeans, 23, of Thruxton Road, Havant, was jailed for 10 months at Portsmouth Crown Court for a racist attack

A shocked line manager at his work, Havant Borough Council contractor Norse South East, reported the racism and Jeans was sacked. But the dad-of-two, of Thruxton Road, Havant, ‘lost control’ when he saw the target of his racist abuse sitting in a works van with a colleague near the depot – and smashed the vehicle with a baton.

Judge Jane Rowley said: ‘This was an incident which was ugly where you deliberately approached the (victim)’s vehicle, you called him racist abusive names which I do not care to repeat. ‘You returned to your vehicle to arm yourself with a weapon – a foot-long cosh. You set about causing maximum damage to his vehicle.’ Shards of glass flew from smashed windows of the van at the two occupants during the incident on November 22 in Southmore Lane, Havant.

Jailing him for 10 months, the judge said: ‘A clear message needs to go out to people like you who harbour such views. ‘Your views will not be tolerated in 21st century multicultural Britain where our successes as a country have been forged by the endeavours of people of many cultures, races and religions.’

Jeans, who has 18 convictions for 32 offences, was charged with having an offensive weapon, racially-aggravated common assault, assault, racially-aggravated criminal damage, criminal damage and racially-aggravated causing fear of violence. ‘I see this behaviour at the highest level of racism. There can be no excuses for your actions,’ the judge said.

Jeans admitted the racist offences only on the second day of his trial in May, after two people from the company had given evidence. The judge added: ‘You chanced your arm in this case, you had an expectation that you were living on borrowed time, that quite possibly work friends or colleagues would not turn up to give evidence – witness summonses had to be issued. ‘When they did the decent thing it was clear to me that they were significantly embarrassed by your racism and bullying, intimidating behaviour towards the victim over the many months leading up to you losing your control and smashing up his vehicle and causing him great fear when you assaulted him in November 2017.’

Damian Haye, for unemployed Jeans, said: ‘This should be treated as an isolated incident, reflecting the loss of control and not a return to former ways.’

Portsmouth News

Terence Poxon told police: ‘Yes, I am being racist’

A racist from Derby accused an Asian taxi driver of being responsible for the Manchester bomb then smashed up his cab with a wooden bat.

Terence Poxon said the victim had “firebombed kids,” and racially abused him – less than a week after the concert tragedy that claimed 25 lives.

The 58-year-old had dressed himself in a Union Jack t-shirt to deliberately parade around Normanton wearing it.

He told police he had armed himself with the weapon in case anyone challenged what he was wearing.

 Terence Poxon, of Shelton Lock, threatened the taxi driver with a wooden baton (Image: Derbyshire police)

Terence Poxon, of Shelton Lock, threatened the taxi driver with a wooden baton (Image: Derbyshire police)

And Poxon also said he was pleased his actions had scared the taxi driver and told officers “yes, I am being racist” as he explained why he did what he did.

Steven Taylor, prosecuting at Derby Crown Court, said the incident took place at around 3.30pm on May 28.

He said Poxon had called a cab from his home in Acorn Close, Shelton Lock, which arrived minutes later.

Mr Taylor said: “The taxi driver asked him where he wanted to go and the defendant answered ‘Normanton’.

“When the driver asked him ‘where in Normanton?’ he suddenly became aggressive and said to the victim ‘you did the Manchester bomb’.

“He then pulled a wooden baton from his sleeve of his coat.”

Mr Taylor said the actions “frightened the cabbie” who managed to pull over in Chellaston Road and get out of the taxi.

He said Poxon also got out and used the weapon to smash three windows and cause dents to the car.

The offence was witnessed by people waiting at a bus stop who the taxi driver had gone over to for protection.

Mr Taylor said: “One of the witnesses said the defendant was wearing a Union Jack t-shirt and gesticulating in a confrontational manner shouting ‘Chelsea, Chelsea’ like a football chant.

“He then pointed at the taxi driver and shouted ‘guilty’.”

The police were called and arrived at the scene but Poxon had walked back to his home.

He was arrested and during the journey to the police station he swore at police officers, continued to racially abuse the taxi driver and said ‘he firebombed kids’.

Mr Taylor said: “He said to the officers ‘yes, I am being racist’ and he was not particularly apologetic about it.

“He told officers his intention was to go to Normanton Road wearing his Union Jack t-shirt and he had the baton in case anyone approached him about it.

“He said had anyone asked about his t-shirt he would have used the baton against them.

“He said he wanted the taxi driver to feel like the little kids did at the Manchester bomb.”

The Manchester Arena blast, on May 22, claimed the lives of 25 people and injured 250 more.

It was carried out by 22-year-old suicide bomber Salman Ramadan Abedi at the end of a concert by the American singer Ariana Grande.

Poxon pleaded guilty to a racially aggravated public order offence, racially-aggravated criminal damage and threatening a person with an offensive weapon in a public place.

Jailing him for 25 weeks, Judge Nirmal Shant QC said: “The victim was doing nothing more than carrying out his job in a law abiding way when you decided you were going to teach him a lesson for something he was not responsible for.

“Your behaviour was wholly unacceptable.”

Stuart Newsome, for Poxon, said his client had never been in trouble with the law before and had physical ailments including stomach problems, liver disease and chronic arthritis.

He said: “He is not a man of entrenched violence by any stretch of the imagination.

“He is remorseful and feels guilty and embarrassed about what he did.”
Derby Telegraph.

A mother and her small children were left terrified as yobs armed with a dog chain and knuckle duster staged a fight in a Sunderland park.

The mum was in Mowbray Park with her daughters, aged six and 13, and another girl, also 13, Sunderland magistrates heard.

All children were in the park’s play area, when the fight took place, at 4pm on Sunday, September 4, the court was told.

Prosecutor Laura Johnson said: “The witness was sitting on a bench in the park when she sees the defendants, Daren Kerr and Sean Ruffell, walking through the park.

“A third male shouts ‘you with the sunglasses’ then goes towards these two defendants.”

Ms Johnson said the third male, who is being dealt with separately, had mistaken Ruffell for somebody else.

However she said Kerr then shouted: “Come on, let’s have a fight.”

“Mr Kerr and the third male then squared up to each other and began to throw a number of punches,” Ms Johnson said.

“Mr Kerr produced a dog chain and started swinging it around in an aggressive manner.

“Mr Ruffell threw two punches at the third male, one missed and the other hit him on the head.

“The witness shouted ‘there’s kids around – grow up’.”

The court heard the trio stated that they would go and fight elsewhere as there were “too many bairns around”.

Ms Johnson said the witness then saw the third male on the ground with Ruffell alongside him.

Police then arrived and intervened. A knuckle duster was recovered from Ruffell.

Kerr was detained, having discarded the dog chain.

Ruffell, 25, told police he and the third male had been ‘dancing’ in a boxing stance.

“He was dancing around like Muhammad Ali,” he said.

Kerr, also 25, said the pair had gone for a drink in a bar and had decided to change their clothing, when they saw the third male in the park.

He asked them if they wanted to go for a drink, to which they said no as the pub would be full of ‘****heads’.

Kerr said the male shouted abuse and he took the dog chain from around his neck.

Ms Johnson said: “He said he had the chain because had been walking his dog earlier, however there were protests in the area and that had made the dog nervous and it had ran off.”

Kerr, of Gartland Road, Grindon, and Ruffell, of Athol Road, Hendon, both admitted possession of an offensive weapon and threatening unlawful violence.

Ruffell admitted the offence in relation to the knuckle duster and Kerr in relation to the dog chain.

Susan Gray, defending, said: “They had both been involved in an earlier incident, where a friend of theirs had been assaulted.

“They were in Mowbray Park when they were approached by the male, who was actually looking for a fight, and they responded.

“Mr Kerr had a dog lead with him

“Mr Ruffell had an ornamental knuckle duster. It had never been used as a weapon, it had been taken off the wall.”

The bench asked for an all-options report to be prepared by the Probation Service, including the possibility of custody.

The pair will be sentenced at South Tyneside Magistrates’ Court on March 24.

Sunderland Echo

A father and son broke down after being sentenced for their part in a brawl at a bar in Folkestone.

Jordan Manwarning, 20, and Paul Manwarning, 40, both pleaded guilty to possessing an offensive weapon in a public place and affray.

Paul Manwarning was sent to prison for the incident.

Paul Manwarning was sent to prison for the incident.

At Folkestone Magistrates’ Court yesterday (June 27) the 20-year-old was handed a 12 month suspended sentence for two years and stood next to his father in the dock as he was sentenced to 12 months. He will spend six months in custody and the remaining six on license.

The charges relate to an incident in January 21 at the Office Bar in The Leas.

Frances Lawson, prosecuting, said: “At 11pm two groups of young people were involved in an altercation in the bar, each group containing five individuals. One of the groups included the defendant, Jordan Manwarning.

“Forty-five minutes later he was seen returning to the bar with a group of males, including his father.

“They were seen holding weapons – Paul Manwarning had a baseball bat. Jordan Manwarning carrying a snapped pole or wooden stick.

“Their behaviour was described as aggressive and they were shouting ‘where are they?’

“CCTV footage shows Jordan Manwarning pushing his chest into members of the public trying to calm the situation down.”

Ms Lawson read out a statement from the bar manager who tried to stop the fight where she said it was the ‘first time in 13 years she had felt frightened’ while working at the bar.

‘An ugly incident’

Jordan Manwarning was seen throwing punches and being pulled back by his father who then swung the baseball bat.

It snapped on a man’s shoulder but the victim did not co-operate with prosecution in the case.

Defending, Kerry Waitt said it was unusual behaviour and he was sorry about the incident.

He told the court: “This is an ugly incident, a very disturbing and frightening incident for anyone present at the bar and not the sort of behaviour representative of my client’s ordinary conduct.

“He is remorseful and that is evident by his plea at the earliest opportunity.”

Phil Rowley, representing Paul Manwarning, agreed with Mr Waitt’s description of the night’s events.

He said: “It was an ugly incident and one the defendant is truly ashamed of his part in.

“He was not intending on involving himself in any unlawful behaviour that evening. He had spent the evening at his partner’s house and returned home once his three year old had gone to bed.”

Manwaring received a call from his son who was distressed and he arrived at the venue to help him.

He also said Mr Manwarning has previously suffered with anxiety and depression and stopped taking medication for this until the case started again.

Read more: This dangerous driving caught on camera in Sandgate has left everyone very confused

As Judge Branston began to read his judgement, the 40-year-old began to cry and put his head in his hands and called out ‘I’ll lose everything.’

His partner was also crying in the public gallery.

Judge Branston said: “Violence like this can not be tolerated. You are his father. you should lead by example and the example you lead by is an appalling one.

“You were the older man and a mature adult and your involvement was more dangerous.”

Jordan Manwarning was ordered to complete 150 hours of unpaid work and subject to a curfew between 7pm and 5am.

Kent Live

A 42-year-old man appeared in court for carrying a pen that could double-up as an offensive weapon in Dover.

Darren Vincent from Gillingham was arrested after he was spotted carrying a “Military/Tactical Pen” in Folkestone Road on January 30, when far-right and anti-fascist protesters clashed in Dover.

Then pen is typically made out of solid metal. It can be used as a “last-ditch self-defence tool”.

Vincent appeared at Thanet Magistrates Court on June 6 and was sentenced to 77 days in prison suspended for 12 months.

He was ordered to carry out 100 hours of unpaid work in the next 12 months and was given a three month curfew to stay at home between 9pm and 5am.

He must also pay £85 in costs and an £80 victim surcharge.

Dover Express

DV

A man stabbed to the neck received life-threatening injuries following scenes in a North Wales village which were today compared to television’s “Shameless” programme.

David Craig Burnie, was jailed for five and a half years.

David Craig Burnie, was jailed for five and a half years.

A man stabbed to the neck received life-threatening injuries following scenes in a North Wales village which were today compared to television’s “Shameless” programme.

Victim Wayne Reginald Hodrien suffered two tears to the jugular vein in the left side of his neck.

The knifeman, David Craig Burnie, was today jailed for five and a half years.

He admitted wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm after an earlier charge of attempted murder was dropped.

Mold Crown Court heard that all parties were under the influence of something and it would never be known precisely what sparked off the violence on the Plas Madoc Estate at Acrefair outside Acrefair, one evening last August.

But following a confrontation at Alwen on the estate, Burnie, 23, went into his home, re-emerged with a knife, and later claimed it was to simply frighten off those who had gathered outside the house.

However, during a fight with Mr Hodrien, Burnie stabbed him to the neck.

In court, it was claimed by defending barrister Robert Parry-Jones that but for the seriousness of the injury the scene would fit into the Channel Four programme “Shameless”.

He said: “It was an appalling situation that occurred that day.”

Judge Niclas Parry told Burnie: “It could have been murder.”

The judge said that once again a person had taken a knife out onto the streets of North Wales to resolve a violent confrontation.

“Once again, a loss of life could have occurred in North Wales because of knife-crime,” he said.

Burnie, he said, had a knife when he was out of control of his senses because of drink.

There had already been a violent confrontation, the defendant did fear for his own personal safety but he could have remained in the house where he had retreated.

“But you chose to come out having collected a knife,” Judge Parry told him.

Outside the violence escalated, the knife was “inevitable used”.

“You used it to stab your victim in the neck. It was life threatening at the time.”

The defendant, he said, had previous convictions for an offensive weapon, two assaults and making a threat to kill.

The judge said that he accepted there was an element of provocation. The greatest mitigation was his guilty plea.

The court heard how the incident happened after the defendant and his girlfriend Claire Hiscock – who had since died – had been to register the birth of their baby.

They spent some time drinking in Wrexham and then returned on the bus to Acrefair.

It was a confused picture about what then took place but Wyn Lloyd Jones prosecuting, said that there appeared to be a number of people in the street, angry about various issues, who appeared drunk or under the influence of something.

The defendant had been involved in a confrontation, went into his house, got the knife, returned outside and was involved in a fight with Mr Hodrien. It was then that he lunged at him with the knife and stabbed him to the left side of his neck.

Mr Hodrien did not want to involve the police, initially said that he had fallen, he was taken to hospital where the wound was cleaned and he discharged himself against medical advice.

But police later returned him to the hospital where he underwent emergency surgery to the stab wound which involved two tears of the left jugular. The experience had left him suffering nightmares, sleepless nights, anxiety and he had lost confidence.

Burnie initially claimed that he had been defending himself but in his basis of plea said that at the time his belief was that he and his girlfriend were about to be attacked. He picked up the knife to frighten off those who came to his house, not to use it. But he accepted that the knife was used after blows were exchanged.

Robert Parry-Jones, defending, said: “We will never really know what happened.” Everyone was affected by something, whether drugs or alcohol.

Burnie did not go out looking for trouble, he did not start it, he did not go out to cause an injury. His perception was that those on the estate did not like him and did not like his girlfriend.

“She is now unfortunately deceased. She took her life. He is devastated about that,” Mr Parry-Jones said.

The defendant had made a serious attempt at his own life since the incident.

That night a group of people gathered outside his home and after what had occurred he knew it was not “for a cosy chat”.

The barrister said: “No one comes out of this with any credit at all. Burnie did not start it, he reacted, and he very much regrets the way that he did react.”

Daily Post

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