Archive

Tag Archives: National Action

A gang of white supremacists convicted of inciting racial hatred for plastering racist stickers around a university campus have been jailed.

Chad Williams-Allen and Garry Jack were both convicted, along with two other men, of inciting racial hatred after plastering offensive stickers across Aston University campus signs in Birmingham in 2016.

Chad Williams-Allen and Garry Jack were both convicted, along with two other men, of inciting racial hatred after plastering offensive stickers across Aston University campus signs in Birmingham in 2016.

Stickers put up at Aston University in Birmingham read “White Zone” and “Britain is ours – the rest must go” on the day of a Black Lives Matter march.

The men also posed for a souvenir-style photo doing Nazi-type salutes.

A judge said they had “potential to cause social unrest and racial tension in the city”.

Chad Williams-Allen, 27, from Bird End, West Bromwich, was sentenced to 21 months in prison during a hearing at Birmingham Crown Court.

Two other men, aged 23 and 27, who cannot be named for legal reasons, were handed 12-month and 16-month sentences respectively.

Garry Jack, 21, formerly of Heathland Road, Shard End, was given a 12-month sentence, suspended for two-years.

The men posed for a photo at Birmingham City University

The men posed for a photo at Birmingham City University

The men, who were caught on the university’s CCTV, accepted posting the 11 stickers, but denied they incited racial hatred.

They insisted they were exercising their right to freedom of speech during the incident on 9 July, 2016.

Judge Paul Farrer QC told them: “The stickers could encourage people to believe that, as you would refer to them, ‘non-whites’ represent a danger to society, and society should be divided along lines of race.”

He also told Williams-Allen, an unemployed welder: “You identified with Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany. You are anti-Semitic and a profound racist

Stickers were also recruitment tools for National Action, which the men were then members of, the judge said.

Images of the men’s handiwork was posted to the extreme far right group’s regional Twitter account soon afterwards, the hearing was told.

Judge Farrer added: “In this way you each intended to stir up racial hatred.

“Your behaviour was calculated to not only undermine these values, but also to foment hatred and unrest in society.”

BBC News

A group of white supremacists have been jailed for plastering racist stickers across a city centre university campus.

After stickering prominent signage on the site, the men then posed for a souvenir-style photo doing Nazi-type salutes and holding the black flag of far-right organisation National Action.

Sentencing the men on Wednesday, a judge said the “pernicious” stickers deposited at Aston University, Birmingham, had “potential to cause social unrest and racial tension in the city”.

Judge Paul Farrer QC, sitting at Birmingham Crown Court, told the men: “The stickers could encourage people to believe that, as you would refer to them ‘non-whites’, represent a danger to society, and society should be divided along lines of race.”

He added that the stickers were also recruitment tools for National Action, of which the men were all then members.

Images of the men’s handiwork was posted to the extreme far right group’s regional Twitter account soon afterwards.

Judge Farrer added: “In this way you each intended to stir up racial hatred.

“We are fortunate to live in a tolerant society.

“Your behaviour was calculated to not only undermine these values, but also to foment hatred and unrest in society.

“The gravity of the offences means it demands immediate imprisonment – with one exception.”

Chad Williams-Allen and Garry Jack were both convicted, along with two other men, of inciting racial hatred after plastering offensive stickers across Aston University campus signs in Birmingham in 2016.

Chad Williams-Allen and Garry Jack were both convicted, along with two other men, of inciting racial hatred after plastering offensive stickers across Aston University campus signs in Birmingham in 2016.

Following a trial last month, Chad Williams-Allen, of Tantany Lane, West Bromwich, and Garry Jack, 22, formerly of Heathland Avenue, Birmingham, were convicted of stirring up racial hatred, alongside two other men who cannot be named for legal reasons.

Williams-Allen, the court heard, played a central role and had a previous conviction for uttering a racially abusive remark at a National Action rally in May 2016, which the judge said was a “significant aggravating factor”.

Farrer told the 27-year-old unemployed welder: “You identified with Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany.

“You are anti-Semitic and a profound racist.

“You made contact with National Action in March 2016, but not require their influence to harbour extreme views on race and multiculturalism.”

Williams-Allen, who had also stated a race war was “inevitable”, was jailed for 21 months with the court hearing how he had provided most of the 11 offensive stickers used on July 9 2016.

The judge sentenced Jack to 12 months for his “subordinate role”, suspending the term for two years, and handing him a five-year criminal behaviour order.

Two other men, a 27-year-old and a 23-year-old, were jailed for 16 months and 12 months respectively for their parts in the enterprise.

After carrying out their stickering, the group bragged about how their activities stirred up offence among “butt-hurt students, sub-humans, and traitors”.

One of the stickers, put on an entrance sign, showed a white figure giving a Nazi-type salute, and carried the words “White Zone – National Action”.

Another read: “Britain is ours – the rest must go.”

A message then later appeared on the Twitter account of the group’s regional arm, the day after the stickering, stating: “The fashy goys (sic) of National Action have hit Aston University campus”.

In 2016 NA became the first far-right group to be banned in the UK.

Then-Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, described the neo-Nazi group as “a racist, anti-Semitic and homophobic organisation”.

The sentences come the day after an alleged member of the group pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism by plotting to murder MP Rosie Cooper last summer.

Jack Renshaw, 23, from Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius Machete to kill the Labour politican last year.

On the opening day of his trial at the Old Bailey, Renshaw pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism as well as making a threat to kill police officer Victoria Henderson.

The court is today due to hear from a whistleblower from the group.
Huffington Post

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

An alleged member of the banned neo-Nazi group National Action has admitted to plotting to kill a British MP and making threats to kill a police officer.

Jack Renshaw, 23, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius machete to kill the West Lancashire Labour MP Rosie Cooper last summer.

On the opening day of his trial at the Old Bailey on Tuesday, Renshaw pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism and making threats to kill a police officer, DC Victoria Henderson.

The judge, Mr Justice Robert Jay, directed the jury to deliver a formal guilty verdict on the two charges. Renshaw also faces a third charge of membership of the banned far right group, which he denies.

He is on trial alongside Christopher Lythgoe, 32, from Warrington, who is charged with encouraging Renshaw to murder Cooper on behalf of National Action, believing the act would be committed. He denies the charges.

Four other men – Garron Helm, 24, of Seaforth, Merseyside; Matthew Hankinson, 24, of Newton-le-Willows, Merseyside; Andrew Clark, 33, and Michael Trubini, 35, both of Warrington – are also charged with membership of National Action. They deny the charge.

The court heard that Renshaw had bought the machete to kill Cooper between 5 June and 3 July last year. He made threats while in a pub in Warrington on 1 July last year, it was alleged.

Duncan Atkinson, prosecuting, told the court that National Action had engaged since 2013 in a campaign of “virulently racist, antisemitic and homophobic propaganda through which it sought to stir up a violent ‘race war’ against ethnic minorities and others it perceived as ‘race traitors’.”

He said the group “actively sought to recruit and radicalise young people through the violent imagery and hate-filled language of its social media messages, its provocative street demonstrations and intimidation of local communities”.

It was such activities, culminating it its support of the murder of the Labour MP Jo Cox in June 2016, that led to its proscription by the home secretary in December 2016.

The court heard how a significant amount of evidence came from a former member of National Action called Robbie Mullen. Mullen, the prosecution said, told how the group, under the leadership of Lythgoe, continued to function post-proscription, with the primary desire to start a race war and to free “white Britain”.

Other sources of evidence included material found at the defendants’ addresses and on their electronic devices, including communications with each other. All of the defendants are alleged to be part of the north-west area groups, which met at a pub in Warrington called the Friar Penketh.

The prosecution said Renshaw planned to engage in politically motivated murder, and sought the approval of the organisation and hoped to advance its cause through this killing. His motivation was also personal, the court heard.

Renshaw was arrested on 11 January 2017 on suspicion of stirring up racial hatred. He was interviewed by an officer called DC Victoria Henderson and a male police officer, before being released pending further investigation.

On Renshaw’s arrest, a phone was recovered and analysed, revealing what police considered to be evidence of child sex offences (grooming), the court heard. Renshaw was again arrested and interviewed in respect of those allegations on 19 May 2017, again by a team including Henderson.

On 1 July 2017, the prosecution said there was a meeting at the Friar Penketh pub attended by most of the defendants. Mullen was also there.

At this meeting, Renshaw told the group he was planning to kill his local member of parliament, Cooper. “She was of the same party, Labour, as Jo Cox MP had been: she was therefore perceived to have the same support for immigration to this country that has been advanced as a reason for Jo Cox’s death, and more especially for National Action’s support for the actions of her murderer,” Atkinson said.

During the meeting Renshaw said that after killing Cooper he would take some people hostage and would demand that DC Henderson attended the scene. “His plan then would be to kill the officer who was, he said, his real target,” Atkinson said.

Renshaw said he had already purchased the machete that he would use to carry out the killing. The weapon, marketed online as offering “19 inches of unprecedented piercing and slashing power at a bargain price”, was later found by police hidden in an airing cupboard.

Renshaw’s internet search history also related to wounding and his identified target, Cooper.

The court heard how nothing of significance would happen without Lythgoe’s approval, and that was why Renshaw brought up the plan. Lythgoe’s alleged response was to give his consent by saying “don’t fuck it up”. He also advised Renshaw to take precautions to ensure his media devices were not linked to other members in the group, the court heard.

Atkinson, prosecuting, said: “The politically and racially motivated killing of an MP would be an act of terrorism, and Renshaw is charged with preparing to carry out just an act.”

Mullen, believing that Renshaw was serious and there was a real and imminent threat to life, reported what had been said to his contacts at Hope Not Hate, after which Cooper was warned of the threat and a police investigation was launched.

National Action was the first extreme rightwing group to be proscribed since the second world war, and the 85th group to be proscribed in the UK overall.
The Guardian

Jack Renshaw, 23, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius Machete to kill Rosie Cooper last summer

Jack Renshaw has admitted plotting to kill the MP

Jack Renshaw has admitted plotting to kill the MP

An alleged National Action member has admitted plotting to murder an MP.

Jack Renshaw, 23, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius Machete to kill Rosie Cooper last summer.

On the opening day of his trial, Renshaw pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism as well as making a threat to kill police officer Victoria Henderson.

Judge Mr Justice Jay directed the jury to deliver a formal guilty verdict on the first two charges Renshaw faces.

He is on trial alongside Christopher Lythgoe, 32, from Warrington, who denies giving Renshaw permission to murder the West Lancashire MP on behalf of National Action on July 1 last year.

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

Renshaw admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper

The pair, along with Garron Helm, 24, of Seaforth, Merseyside, Matthew Hankinson, 24, of Newton-le-Willows, Merseyside, Andrew Clarke, 33, and Michal Trubini, 35, both of Warrington, also deny membership of the banned far right group.

The case continues in court.

 Court sketch of the accused sat in the Old Bailey (Image: Julia Quenzler / SWNS.com)

Court sketch of the accused sat in the Old Bailey (Image: Julia Quenzler / SWNS.com)

Daily Mirror

White supremacist Ethan Stables deemed ‘risk to the public’ after planning terror act

A white supremacist who planned to carry out a machete attack at a gay pride event has been detained indefinitely in hospital.

Ethan Stables, 20, was convicted in February of planning an act of terrorism after he boasted online of his planned attack on an LGBT event at a pub in Cumbria.

Armed police swooped on Stables as he walked towards the New Empire pub in Barrow, Cumbria, on 23 June in 2017. He was unarmed but police later found an axe and a machete at his home.

Officers had received a tip-off from a member of a far-right Facebook group where Stables posted a message saying he was “going to war” and that he planned to “slaughter every single one of the gay bastards”.

Stables, who has an autism spectrum disorder, was described by a judge as a “risk to the public” as he was sentenced to an indefinite hospital order at Leeds crown court on Wednesday.

The Recorder of Leeds, Judge Peter Collier QC, said although Stables had not carried out the attack he had caused “alarm and distress” with the plans he had made.

The judge added: “It’s my clear decision that, for the protection of the public, a hospital order and restriction order are necessary.”

During Stables’ trial jurors were shown police bodycam footage of officers searching the defendant’s bedroom, where they discovered an arsenal of knifes, an air rifle and a machete, and a large Nazi flag pinned to the wall. A government explosives expert told the court that material found in the flat could have been used to make a credible bomb.

He denied he was doing a “recce” of the pub he planned to attack when he was arrested and said he was on his way to sit outside the jobcentre to use its free public wifi.

After he was arrested, police found Stables had made internet searches for “how to make chemical poison”, “what is prison like for a murderer”, “I want to go on a killing spree” and “do you get haircuts in prison”.

The jury was shown a video of him burning a rainbow flag while saying: “Look at it, that rainbow, so much nicer when it’s on fire. It’s just like gay people. Much nicer when they’re on fire.”

Stables can also be heard talking about joining the DUP to “execute gay people” and the English Defence League, while another man can be heard discussing what food he is going to order in the background.

The court heard that Stables had swapped messages with fellow extremists, blaming the fact that he was jobless on “faggots, niggers, spastics” and the Equalities Act.

He expressed a hatred of Muslims and Jews, and claimed in a WhatsApp message a month before his arrest: “My country is being raped … I might just become a skinhead and kill people.”

In a conversation on Facebook to which police were alerted, Stables said: “There’s a pride night. I’m going to walk in with a machete and slaughter every single one of them.” He added: “I don’t care if I die. I’m fighting for what I believe in and that is the future of my country, my folk and my race.”

During the trial, Stables’ barrister described him as “lonely and inadequate”, arguing that he was a “white fantasist” and not a white supremacist.

Stables claimed he had made racist and homophobic comments only to fit in with the people to whom he was speaking online. He told his trial that he was politically liberal and a bisexual, having had sexual experiences with men.

Giving evidence, Stables’ mother Elaine Asbury said her son had been radicalised when he went to visit his girlfriend in Germany. She said she had received little support from mental health services in looking after her son and had thrown him out of her home when he was 17 because he threatened to decapitate her and burn the house down.

The Guardian

Ethan Stables, 20, was arrested by armed police in Barrow, Cumbria after he bragged of planning to “slaughter every single one of the gay b******s”

 Stables had taken videos of him trying to light a Rainbow flag, associated with gay pride, on fire (Image: GMP)

Stables had taken videos of him trying to light a Rainbow flag, associated with gay pride, on fire (Image: GMP)

A homophobic neo-Nazi terrorist has been detained indefinitely in a psychiatric hospital after plotting an axe and machete attack on a pub’s gay pride night.

Armed police swooped on 20-year-old Ethan Stables as he walked towards the New Empire in his hometown of Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, last summer.

Officers had received a tip-off after white supremacist Stables posted a Facebook message saying he was “going to war” and that he planned to “slaughter every single one of the gay b******s”.

He also filmed a video of himself setting fire to a gay pride flag, and posing next to a swastika.

Although he was unarmed when he was arrested on June 23, police found an axe, a machete and knives at his home, his trial heard.

The right-wing extremist had a swastika hanging on his bedroom wall and bought a new Nazi armband after his was taken by police when he was arrested.

Stables, who told a court he was bisexual, had Googled “how to make chemical poison”, “what is prison like for a murderer”, “I want to go on a killing spree” and, bizarrely, “do you get haircuts in prison”.

Officers discovered that, as well as researching firearms, he had also looked into methods for making a bomb.

Stables was found guilty in February at Leeds Crown Court of preparing an act of terrorism and making threats to kill.

Jurors heard he communicated his hatred for Muslims and Jews, with one WhatsApp message reading: “My country is being raped.

“I might just become a skinhead and kill people.”

He had admitted a number of other offences before the start of his trial.

The jury was shown a video of him burning a rainbow flag and posing next to a swastika hanging on his bedroom wall.

He had espoused homophobic, racist and Nazi views online, the court was told.

Giving evidence, Stables, who has been diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome, claimed he was a just fantasist and was himself bisexual.

 There was also a selection of weapons Stables may have used in the planned massacre (Image: SWNS.com)

There was also a selection of weapons Stables may have used in the planned massacre (Image: SWNS.com)

Following his conviction, his barrister Patrick Upward QC told the Recorder of Leeds, Judge Peter Collier QC, that Stables led a “melancholy life” up to the day of his arrest and lived in “almost squalid conditions”.

Mr Upward said: “He bears no comparison with the men who attacked Corporal (Lee) Rigby, no comparison with the men who went on the rampage at Borough Market and no comparison with the man who ran people over on Westminster Bridge and stabbed a police officer.

“Whatever he was doing that night, he did not have a fuse to set it off. He did not have the wherewithal to make the fuse.”

Prosecutor Jonathan Sandiford told the judge that Stables had intended to attack multiple persons and had looked at a number of ways of doing it.

Stables told the court he is bisexual and has an autism spectrum condition.

He denied he was doing a “recce” of the venue when he was arrested and said he was heading out to sit outside the jobcentre to use the free public WiFi.

Daily Mirror



A CASTLEFORD man found to be a member of the now-banned neo-Nazi group National Action been jailed for four-years-and-three-months for posting racist and anti-Semitic messages.

Wayne Bell, age 37, of Mount Walk, Castleford, posted an image on a Russian social media site showing a man being hung by a rope with a Star of David on his forehead, the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said.

In another post he described Jewish people as “destructive” and “vile”.

Prosecutors said Bell was also behind hate-filled graffiti.

A CPS spokesman said that Bell posted in August 2016, “The only way,” below a photo of a police officer’s foot raised above the head of an unarmed black man, lying on the ground.

The spokesman said that in late 2016 he posted a number of messages on Twitter continuing his campaign of stirring up hatred against Jewish and black people.

Bell was a prominent member of National Action before its was banned 18 months ago and he featured in two posters used in a recruitment campaign.

The spokesman said 13 videos were found on Bell’s mobile phone and featured an unseen man – believed to be Bell – directing others who were daubing anti-Semitic graffiti, including swastikas and references to the Holocaust.

A rucksack found at his workplace in Leeds contained National Action stickers.

Bell pleaded guilty at Leeds Crown Court to two counts of stirring up racial hatred and three counts of possession of items with intent to destroy or damage property.

Last year he was sentenced to 30 months in prison after clashes between members of National Action and anti-fascist groups in Liverpool in February 2016.

Head of the Counter-Terrorism Division in the CPS, Sue Hemming, said: “Wayne Bell is a committed racist who posted messages on social media intending to stir up racial hatred against Jewish and black people.

“He was also behind graffiti that promoted his Neo-Nazi views and his deep rooted-hatred of all non-Aryan races.”

Detective Chief Superintendent Martin Snowden, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing North East, said: “Activity like this has the potential to both influence vulnerable people and threaten the stability of our communities by inciting hatred and threatening public safety and security.

“We will not tolerate any action which attempts to undermine or divide our communities and will continue to counter extremism and terrorism in all its forms.”

Chief Superintendent Mabs Hussain, district commander of Wakefield Police, said: “We welcome Bell’s sentence today for what are serious offences intended to cause to cause disharmony between communities, and I am very pleased with the investigation conducted by colleagues at Counter Terrorism Policing North East.

“The Wakefield district overwhelmingly enjoys good and positive relationships between its various communities and I am pleased that extremists such as Bell are in a very small minority indeed.”

Yorkshire Evening Post