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Alleged neo-Nazi, Claudia Patatas, 38, from Banbury, leaves Birmingham Crown Court (Aaron Chown/PA)

Alleged neo-Nazi, Claudia Patatas, 38, from Banbury, leaves Birmingham Crown Court (Aaron Chown/PA)

An alleged far-right terrorist posed for a photo cradling his new-born baby, wearing the hooded white robes of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK), a court heard.

Adam Thomas, 22, and his partner Claudia Patatas, 38, gave their child the middle name Adolf -which the prosecution has alleged was in honour of the infamous Nazi leader Hitler.

On Wednesday, a court also heard how Patatas had allegedly sent a WhatsApp message reading “all Jews must be put to death”, while Thomas bemoaned the fact he had a “fat p**i” as a work colleague.

Jurors were also shown another image, said to be of Thomas in a Klansmen’s robe and brandishing a machete in front of a Confederate flag.

The flag was shown hanging over a sofa, on which were two scatter cushions each bearing the Swastika.

The couple also allegedly had a poster stuck to their fridge reading “Britain is ours – the rest must go”.

The Crown have further claimed the couple were pictured at home with another man, a convicted racist and “vehement Nazi”, who was holding a Swastika flag and performing a Hitler-style salute over their baby.

Thomas and Patatas, both of Waltham Gardens, Banbury, Oxfordshire, are on trial at Birmingham Crown Court accused of being members of the far-right terrorist group National Action, banned in December 2016.

Co-defendant Daniel Bogunovic, 27, of Crown Hills Rise, Leicester, is also in the dock facing the same membership charge.

Thomas is facing a separate charge of having a terrorist document, the Anarchy Cookbook, which contained bomb-making instructions.

Barnaby Jameson QC, prosecuting, showed jurors a series of photographs said to be of Thomas in KKK robes, including one with the child.

He said: “The suggestion is that is Mr Thomas and his child, whose middle name is Adolf.”

Turning to an image of a hooded man with a machete, Mr Jameson added: “There is a strong inference, and you’ll appreciate this when you look inside the Thomas and Patatas’ house, that that was taken inside their home, and that the person in the robes was Thomas.”

It emerged in court that counter-terrorism officers from Prevent had visited the couple’s home in October last year “due to concerns Ms Patatas may be involved in the extreme right wing”.

However, an online chat message allegedly sent by Thomas showed he was unfazed.

He said: “I have my flags up, lol – and f**k social services, they have no basis of claim of anything.”

In a message from work that Thomas is said to have sent to Patatas, bemoaning his colleagues in September 2017, he said: “A fat half bred n****r who is typical of the Birmingham type of mongrel, a fat p**i and a black as hell Rastafarian.

“What I’ve found is that all non-whites are intolerable but the ones who have lived here most of their lives are even worse.

“They have a more thuggery attitude about them as opposed to the sterotypical childish African.”

Mr Jameson took the jury through a series of what he described as “further shots from the Thomas-Patatas family album”, showing each of them with the Swastika flag, and another man, convicted racist Darren Fletcher.

Alleged neo-Nazi terrorist, Claudia Patatas, 38, from Banbury, arriving at court, where she and partner Thomas are on trial accused of being members of far-right extremist group National Action (Aaron Chown/PA)

Alleged neo-Nazi terrorist, Claudia Patatas, 38, from Banbury, arriving at court, where she and partner Thomas are on trial accused of being members of far-right extremist group National Action (Aaron Chown/PA)

Jurors were earlier told how Patatas allegedly sent a WhatsApp message on February 2017 to Fletcher, reading: “And all Jews must be put to death.”

Fletcher, the jury heard, has already admitted being a member of the banned organisation before the trial.

The 28-year-old, of Kitchen Lane, Wednesfield, Wolverhampton, had a race hate conviction for dressing as a Ku Klux Klansman and hanging a “golliwog” from a noose while on stage at a White Pride event in 2013.

Following the ban, the prosecution alleged National Action tried to “shed one skin for another” in order to evade the law, and that the three defendants were part of a successor organisation called the TripleK Mafia.

The Crown’s case is that the group was still National Action in all but name, and merely went through a “re-branding” exercise to evade scrutiny by the authorities.

All three defendants deny wrong-doing and the trial, set to last four weeks, continues.

Belfast Telegraph



A DRUG addict who robbed a college lecturer at knifepoint has been jailed.

Craig Gilroy, 23, of Ribble Road, central Blackpool, took cash, an iPhone and food from his victim when he pounced on the man in an alleyway at the back of a mini market on Palatine Road.

The thug pleaded guilty to robbery at Preston Crown Court yesterday, and was jailed for two years and eight months.

Louise Whaites, prosecuting, said Gilroy approached his victim on November 3 and was holding a glinting eight inch bladed knife by his waist.

Gilroy demanded money, but the lecturer, who was walking home from Blackpool and the Fylde College university campus on Palatine Road, said he did not have any.

Miss Whaites told the court: “The defendant pushed him against the alleyway wall, raised the hand holding the knife and held it to his neck and again requested money.”

The man gave him £10 cash and went on to give him his iPhone, worth £495, and a bag of food.

He waited in the alley until Gilroy had rejoined two other men and moved away from the area, and became extremely distressed when he arrived home.

Gilroy, who was wearing a hooded top at the time, with a scarf up to his nose, later sold the mobile for £20 and bought two bags of heroin.

The thief, who has 65 previous offences on his record, told his partner he had “jacked some guy”, but denied the offence when questioned by police.

Paul Humphries, defending, said his client accepted using the knife to threaten, but denied any intent to use it to cause harm. He also denied threatening to kill the man if he went to the police.

Mr Humphries said: “He tells me he is very sorry. He understands the pain and misery he has caused the male and his family.

“He wishes he could turn the clock back. He was at a low point in his life.

“There was also a food shortage in the house.”

Gilroy had also been on a methadone programme but was not attending at the time.

Judge Philip Butler said: “It must have been a terrifying experience for the man.

“That he suffered no physical injury is very little mitigation because one can imagine the psychological effect”.

From 2011

Blackpool Gazette

A thief who was short of money in the run up to Christmas targeted the same shop two days running.

Craig Gilroy, 30, of George Street, North Shore, pleaded guilty to two offences of theft.

He was given a 12 months conditional discharge and ordered to pay £47 compensation with £85 costs plus £20 victims’ surcharge.

Prosecutor, Pam Smith, said Gilroy was detained at the B and M Bargains store, Whitegate Drive, on December 23 at noon, after stealing three jars of coffee valued at £14.

CCTV showed he had been in the shop the day before and taken four bottles of liqueur worth £47.

He had a record of 29 previous offences of theft and similar matters and at the time of the offence was on post prison sentence supervision.

Howard Green, defending, said in the run up to Christmas his client was short of money and decided to steal to get some. Gilroy, who had been diagnosed with bi-polar disorder, was estranged from his family.

He had no permanent accommodation but was allowed to sleep at the address he had given.

He had also missed appointments with the probation service on his post prison sentence supervision.

Blackpool Gazette

A prisoner apologised after making loud banging noises from his cell under Blackpool Magistrates’ Court which could be heard in the courtrooms.

Craig Gilroy, 30, of Chesterfield Road, North Shore, pleaded guilty to two offences of theft.

He was sentenced to a six months community order with up to 15 days rehabilitation to be supervised by the probation service, banned from entering Marks and Spencer, Church Street, for six months and ordered to pay £35 compensation with £85 costs plus £85 victims’ surcharge by District Judge Jane Goodwin sitting at Blackpool Magistrates’ Court.

Prosecutor, Andrew Robinson, said Gilroy took a woman’s jacket worth £35 from Marks and Spencer on September 16 at 10.15am.

He was chased but got away.

At midday security officers spotted him and when he was apprehended Gilroy was found to have five jackets valued at £175 from Marks and Spencer which he had stolen just minutes earlier.

Gilroy at the time of the thefts was on licence from prison.

He had a criminal record of 99 previous offences.

Brett Chappell, defending, said his client had stolen from Marks and Spencer because his benefits had not yet been in place and he had been using Spice.

Blackpool Gazette

A FAR-right supporter who set fire to Newport’s Masonic Lodge and Bassaleg secondary school, and daubed swastikas and racist slogans on buildings across the city, has been jailed for a total of six years.

Austin Ross, 23, carried out the two arson attacks and his spree of hate-fuelled criminal damage during May this year.

The Riverfront Theatre, Maindee primary school, Gwent Probation Service’s Lower Dock Street offices, and the Bethel Community Church were among his other targets.

Ross, of Romney Close, St Julians, Newport, carried out the attacks, said Judge Jeremy Jenkins, “out of sheer hatred and malice”, based on a “perverted view of race and religion”.

Ross pleaded guilty last month to 15 charges, including two of arson.

He began by sticking a racially offensive poster,, and spray painting a swastika, on a window at the Riverfront Theatre in Newport, between May 2 and May 5.

The poster, along with several others Ross subsequently stuck to buildings in Newport, referenced the neo-Nazi System Resistance Network (SRN).

On May 4, the Bethel Community Church was targeted with posters and swastikas, as was Maindee primary school, where parents removed posters and handed them in to the school.

The school was targeted again on May 8 and May 25, but Ross had in the interim stuck posters and daubed swastikas on a wall at the Newport Centre.

Between May 25-30 he targeted the Gwent Probation Service building on Lower Dock Street with a spray painted far right message.

And on May 28, racist graffiti and a swastika were daubed on a wall at the University of South Wales campus on Usk Way.

Ross’ criminal activities then took an even more sinister turn.

On the night of May 28 he posted a flammable liquid through the letterbox at the Masonic Lodge in Lower Dock Street and set fire to it – an act caught on CCTV – causing £38,000 of damage.

And on the same night he caused around £20,000 of damage to a classroom at Bassaleg School after setting fire to a window blind.

Both buildings were also daubed with racist graffiti.

Police issued CCTV images of a man clad in black clothing, to try to track down the perpetrator.

Acting on a tip-off, they arrested Ross at an address in Grosvenor Road, Bassaleg, on June 5.

The Bassaleg and the Romney Close addresses were searched, and items found included cardboard swastika stencils and neo-Nazi posters.

Defence counsel Harry Baker said several references submitted on behalf of Ross showed “a different side” to him.

But sentencing him, Judge Jenkins was scathing of Ross’ crimes.

“You daubed swastikas and other highly offensive literature on schools, a church, a theatre, a footbridge and other buildings,” he said.

“You deliberately set fire to the Masonic Lodge and Bassaleg secondary school.

“Your actions were not born of some mental disorder, but out of hatred and malice based upon your perverted view of race and religion, and others dissimilar to yourself.

“That, in a civilised society is as abhorrent as it is impossible to comprehend.”

Ross was sentenced to three years in prison on each arson charge, to run consecutively.

He was also sentenced to six months on each of 13 charges of racially aggravated criminal damage. These will run concurrently to the arson sentences.

Speaking after the senetencing hearing, Detective Chief Inspector Nicholas Wilkie, of Gwent Police, said: “The offences committed by Ross in Newport in May of this year were very serious, and understandably resulted in concern and distress throughout our community.

“There is no place for hate crime in Gwent, and we will continue to take a zero tolerance approach to this type of offending.

“We are committed to ensuring our neighbourhoods are welcoming and safe places for everyone, and any crime motivated by racial, sexual, or any other prejudice, will be investigated thoroughly and any offender dealt with robustly.

“We would encourage anyone who has experienced or witnessed an incident or crime that they perceive to be motivated by hostility or prejudice, to report to us directly on 101 or 999, online at http://www.report-it.org or through Victim Support on 0300 30 31 982.”

Cerys Beresford-Evans of the Crown Prosecution Service, said: “Ross spread his racist messages around Newport by causing damage and destruction to buildings.

“Hate crime has no place in a civilised society and has a devastating impact on not only individuals, but on communities.

“The CPS will continue to work with our partners in the criminal justice system to address all forms of hate crime.”

South Wales Argus

Jack Coulson has been detained in a young offender institution after committing a terror offence (Image: South Yorkshire Police

Jack Coulson has been detained in a young offender institution after committing a terror offence (Image: South Yorkshire Police

A teenager from Mexborough has been sentenced to more than four and a half years behind bars after downloading instructions on how to make bombs and extreme right-wing propaganda.

Jack Coulson, aged 19, of Roman Gardens, pleaded guilty to possessing a document or record for terrorist purposes at Leeds Crown Court on Monday, July 16.

The charge followed his arrest in January this year as part of an investigation by Counter Terrorism Policing North East and South Yorkshire Police.

An examination of Coulson’s mobile phone revealed he’d downloaded information on how to obtain and mix explosives and how to manufacture pipe bombs and other explosive devices.

It uncovered a wide range of extreme right wing material and propaganda, including racist and anti-Semitic imagery.

His search history also indicated an interest in National Action, Nazism and White Jihad.

Detective Superintendent Simon Atkinson of Counter Terrorism Policing North East said: “Jack Coulson was in possession of disturbing and potentially dangerous material, which indicated an extreme right wing mind set and an interest in home-made explosives.

“He hadn’t come across this material by chance, but had actively searched for it and downloaded it. While no evidence was found to suggest Coulson was planning to act on this information, the combination of this material and his ideology is very concerning.

“This case also highlights the dangers of material that is readily available on the Internet, material that could be misused, or used for a terrorist purpose. Searching for and storing information of this nature has the potential to put the safety of others at risk will not go unprosecuted. In the wrong hands it could have serious consequences.”

Sheffield Star

Jack Coulson, 19, admitted to possessing a document or record for terrorist purposes between January 4 and January 19 this year, namely The Big Book Of Mischief

Jack Coulson, 19, admitted to possessing a document or record for terrorist purposes between January 4 and January 19 this year, namely The Big Book Of MischiefJack Coulson, 19, admitted to possessing a document or record for terrorist purposes between January 4 and January 19 this year, namely The Big Book Of Mischief

Jack Coulson, 19, admitted to possessing a document or record for terrorist purposes between January 4 and January 19 this year, namely The Big Book Of Mischief


A Nazi-obsessed teenager who kept a DIY bomb-making manual has been locked up for four years and eight months.

Jack Coulson, 19, admitted to possessing a document or record for terrorist purposes between January 4 and January 19 this year, namely The Big Book Of Mischief.

Prosecutors allege he downloaded the manual shortly after boasting to people in an approved hostel about wanting to kill a female MP, an incident which led to a police interview but no further charge.

Coulson, who has a previous conviction for making a pipe bomb found in his Nazi memorabilia-filled bedroom, claimed Hitler was his “hero,” a court heard.

Leeds Crown Court heard how the 60-page manual, downloaded to the defendant’s phone, seeks to “demonstrate the techniques and methods used in a number of countries to make hazardous devices”.

It was also claimed the document provides information on the chemicals needed to build weapons, as well as practical advice on detonators, handguns and rockets.

Further searches of his phone uncovered references to proscribed right-wing group National Action.

They also found audio recordings of people screaming in the aftermath of gunshots and internet searches for Timothy McVeigh, the American terrorist who carried out the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing which led to the deaths of 168 people.

Coulson, from Mexborough, South Yorkshire, was handed his sentence at Leeds Crown Court today, which he will serve in a young offenders institution.

David Temkin, prosecuting, claimed the teenager continues to hold “an active interest in far-right political views and violence”, and had a note in his house which read: “They are not going to cure me of my views.”

Mr Temkin added that, during a police interview, Coulson had described Adolf Hitler as his “leader” and said he identified as a “National Socialist”.

Jack Coulson has been detained in a young offender institution after committing a terror offence (Image: South Yorkshire Police

Jack Coulson has been detained in a young offender institution after committing a terror offence (Image: South Yorkshire Police

Coulson was also found guilty last year of making an explosive device but avoided being locked up.

Instead he was given a three year youth rehabilitation order- which was revoked today – and banned from using the internet.

At his first trial in February 2017, the teenager was said to hold “perverted views” and celebrated the murder of Labour MP Jo Cox.

Jurors were told how a pipe bomb was found in a desk drawer in his Swastika covered bedroom on July 26 after police were alerted through suspicious Snapchat messages.

Prosecutors said one of these messages was a cartoon-like image of a mosque being blown up along with the words: “It’s time to enact retribution upon the Muslim filth.”

The teen told the court he had no intention of using the device which contained 19 grammes of explosive material he had gathered from sparklers.

An examination of Coulson’s mobile phone revealed he’d downloaded information on how to obtain and mix explosives and how to manufacture pipe bombs and other explosive devices.

It uncovered a wide range of extreme right wing material and propaganda, including racist and anti-Semitic imagery.

His search history also indicated an interest in National Action, Nazism and White Jihad, counter terrorism police said.

At Leeds Crown Court on Monday he was remanded in custody for the latest offence until his sentence hearing today.

Sentencing Coulson to four years and eight months in a young offenders institution, Judge Marson QC told the teenager on Thursday: “Time and time again you were a given a chance in relation to the previous offence.

“Help was repeatedly given, but you continued to breach the order that was given to you.

“You are unable to address the very real problems which you have in relation to your right-wing views.”

Discussing the teenager’s “extreme social isolation”, Kate O’Raghallaigh, defending, said: “His belief system and expressed opinions, unpalatable as they are, bear no relevance to the sentence that Your Honour should pass.”

She added there was no evidence that the defendant accessed the manual more than once or that he was intending to carry out any further offences.

Photo issued by North East CTU of Nazi memorabilia in the bedroom of teenager Jack Coulson

Photo issued by North East CTU of Nazi memorabilia in the bedroom of teenager Jack Coulson

Coulson was not named in reports of his pipe-bomb trial in early 2017 after the court banned his identification because he was 17 at the time.

The judge in that trial, Mr Justice Goss, said Coulson’s “perverted” views led to him proclaiming Thomas Mair, the man who murdered Labour MP Jo Cox, to be a hero.

Following the sentencing on Thursday, Detective Superintendent Simon Atkinson, Head of Investigations at Counter Terrorism Policing North East, said: “Jack Coulson was in possession of disturbing and potentially dangerous material, which indicated an extreme right wing mind set and an interest in home-made explosives.

“He hadn’t come across this material by chance, but had actively searched for it and downloaded it.

“While no evidence was found to suggest Coulson was planning to act on this information, the combination of this material and his ideology is very concerning.”

He added: “This case also highlights the dangers of material that is readily available on the Internet, material that could be misused, or used for a terrorist purpose.

“Searching for and storing information of this nature has the potential to put the safety of others at risk (and) will not go unprosecuted. In the wrong hands it could have serious consequences.”

“While no evidence was found to suggest Coulson was planning to act on this information, the combination of this material and his ideology is very concerning.”

He added: “This case also highlights the dangers of material that is readily available on the Internet, material that could be misused, or used for a terrorist purpose.

“Searching for and storing information of this nature has the potential to put the safety of others at risk (and) will not go unprosecuted. In the wrong hands it could have serious consequences.”

Daily Mirror