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Michal Szewczuk produced propaganda for a neo-Nazi group called the Sonnenkrieg Division


A teenage neo-Nazi who suggested Prince Harry should be shot for marrying a woman of mixed race has pleaded guilty to terror offences at the Old Bailey.

Michal Szewczuk, 19, of Leeds, admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism and five of possessing documents useful to a terrorist.

The charges relate to a neo-Nazi group called the Sonnenkrieg Division.

Co-defendant Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, 18, from west London, pleaded guilty in December to encouraging terrorism.

Both of them were granted conditional bail and are due to be sentenced at the Old Bailey on 17 June.

The pair produced Sonnenkrieg propaganda that, among other things, said Prince Harry was a “race traitor” who should be shot, and lionised the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik.

They publicised the propaganda on the social media site Gab, including on a page for the Sonnenkrieg group itself.

Szewczuk, hiding behind a pseudonym, also used a separate account to posts links to self-authored diatribes that called for the “systematic slaughtering” of women and the rape of babies.

Detectives found Szewczuk in possession of bomb-making instructions, documents describing how to conduct Islamist terror attacks and a “white resistance” manual.

The Sonnenkrieg group, which was exposed last year by a BBC investigation, was created as a British version of the American neo-Nazi organisation Atomwaffen Division, which has been linked to five murders.

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism in December

Szewczuk and Dunn-Koczorowski were arrested the morning after a BBC investigation exposed the group’s activities.

Another man was also arrested and has since been released under investigation.

The group’s ideology, which is influenced by figures such as the murderous cult leader Charles Manson, is a strain of neo-Nazism that openly encourages criminality and acts of terrorism.

Online propaganda and private chat logs show members engaging in extreme misogyny, as well as exalting Jihadist terrorism and a violent strand of Satanism.

Some private messages seen by the BBC suggest Sonnenkrieg members encouraged young women to engage in acts of self-harm.

The Sonnenkrieg Division grew out of a split in the now largely defunct System Resistance Network, which was created after the neo-Nazi group National Action was banned under anti-terror laws in 2016.

Sonnenkrieg and System Resistance Network both contained one-time members of National Action, including Dunn-Koczorowski.

BBC News

Jack Renshaw also sent explicit messages but claimed he was being framed by an anti facist group

Neo-Nazi Jack Renshaw offered a teenage boy £300 to spend the night with him

Neo-Nazi Jack Renshaw offered a teenage boy £300 to spend the night with him


A white supremacist groomed two children online by sending them explicit sexual pictures and offered one boy £300 for the night.

Jack Renshaw, from Skelmersdale, claimed he was set up by the anti fascist group Hope not Hate in a bid to discredit him.

The self-confessed Neo Nazi told the court that the group maliciously hacked his mobile phone and sent the sexual messages to the teenagers.

However, jurors believed he was lying and found him guilty of four counts of inciting a child to engage in sexual activity during a trial at Preston Crown Court in June last year.

The former leader of the British National Party youth wing set up two fake Facebook profiles and contacted the boys, aged 13 and 14, between February 2016 and January 2017.

Using Facebook Messenger, Renshaw, boasted that he was rich, could give the boys jobs, asked for intimate pictures and even offered £300 to one boy spend the night with him.

Renshaw, who also plotted to kill local MP Rosie Cooper, was jailed for 16 months after one of the boys told a tutor about the messages and he was reported to police.

Police seized two Blackberry phones from his family’s then address in Blackpool but most of the internet history had been deleted.

However, officers recovered some material that included searches for homosexual pornography.

The 23-year-old also received a three-year prison sentence two months earlier when he was found guilty by a different jury at the same court of stirring up racial hatred after he called for the genocide of Jewish people.

Both cases can be fully reported following the end of proceedings he faced at the Old Bailey where a jury was unable to reach a verdict on a charge that he was a member of banned far-right group National Action.

Another two phones belonging to Renshaw were later recovered and they showed evidence of searches for homosexual pornography.

When interviewed, he told police he was heterosexual and a virgin who did not believe in sex outside of marriage, and viewed homosexuality as “unnatural”.

He went on to blame the police for putting material on his phone as he told them: “I believe this is a vicious, malicious attack to put me in prison, to ostracise me from the nationalist movement and to ostracise me from my family.”

But at his trial he said that was a “kneejerk reaction” and he told the jury he now believed Hope Not Hate had hacked all four phones by “some form of synchronised access”.

He said: “They are obsessed with me. They had a gripe with me for a long time.

“They have been writing articles about me since 2014.

“There was a pure hatred of me and everything I stand for.”

Cross-examined by prosecutor Louise Brandon, he dismissed the views of three experts who gave evidence that hacking had not taken place and explained he had some experience in the field as a technician at Dixons Retail where he resolved computer hitches for customers.

Miss Brandon said his suggestion of remote access to his phones was one worthy of a spy novel.

She said to him: “The reality of this is you know that if people whose views you want and whose opinions matter to you knew you were interested in men and young boys then they would cast you out.”

Renshaw replied: “That is not the case at all. The nationalist cause has gays in it. It’s just I’m not gay.”

Following his convictions for the child sex offences he was placed on the Sex Offender Register for 10 years and was told by Judge Robert Altham his 16-month jail term would start after he has completed his sentence for inciting racial hatred.

Renshaw had denied those offences, committed during a demonstration by a group named the North West Infidels on Blackpool Promenade in March 2016, and at a gathering of far-right extremists, the Yorkshire Forum For Nationalists, held the month before.

The court heard that the defendant had described Jewish people as parasites and called for them to be “eradicated” at the Yorkshire event, where he spoke to delegates from other far-right organisations.

During that sentencing hearing, Renshaw nodded his head in the dock as Judge Altham questioned whether he still held the same views as he had when he gave the two speeches.

The judge noted: “The defendant is resolute in his original views and withdraws nothing.

“He seeks to raise street armies, perpetrate violence against Jewish people and ultimately bring about genocide.”

Liverpool Echo

It was revealed in court he had groomed two underage boys online


The leader of banned neo-Nazi group National Action is a convicted paedophile who was jailed last year for grooming two underage boys online, it can now be revealed.

White supremacist Jack Renshaw set up two fake Facebook profiles and contacted the boys, aged 13 and 14, between February 2016 and January 2017.

Communicating via the Facebook Messenger app, Renshaw boasted to the youngsters that he was rich, could give them jobs and offered one of them £300 to spend the night with him.

He also requested intimate photographs of the pair before one of the boys reported the messages to his tutor and the police were contacted.

Renshaw claimed in his defence that an anti-fascist group made up the allegations to discredit him.

He said Hope Not Hate had maliciously hacked his mobile phones to send messages of a sexual nature to the teenagers.

But jurors at Preston Crown Court did not believe him, and convicted him of four counts of inciting a child to engage in sexual activity. He was sentenced to 16 months in jail.

Renshaw, 23, from Skelmersdale, Lancashire, also received a three-year prison sentence two months earlier when he was found guilty by a different jury at the same court of stirring up racial hatred after he called for the genocide of Jewish people.

Both cases can be fully reported following the end of proceedings he faced at the Old Bailey – where a jury was unable to reach a verdict on a charge that he was a member of banned far-right group National Action.

Investigations led to the seizure of two BlackBerry phones from Renshaw’s then family address in Blackpool, Lancashire.

Much of the internet history on the phones had been deleted but officers used specialist software to retrieve some of the relevant material.

Another two phones belonging to Renshaw were later recovered and they showed evidence of searches for homosexual pornography.

When interviewed, he told police he was heterosexual and a virgin who did not believe in sex outside of marriage, and viewed homosexuality as “unnatural”.

He went on to blame the police for putting material on his phone as he told them: “I believe this is a vicious, malicious attack to put me in prison, to ostracise me from the nationalist movement and to ostracise me from my family.”

But at his trial he said that was a “kneejerk reaction” and he told the jury he now believed Hope Not Hate had hacked all four phones by “some form of synchronised access”.

He said: “They are obsessed with me. They had a gripe with me for a long time.

“They have been writing articles about me since 2014.

“There was a pure hatred of me and everything I stand for.”

Cross-examined by prosecutor Louise Brandon, he dismissed the views of three experts who gave evidence that hacking had not taken place and explained he had some experience in the field as a technician at Dixons Retail where he resolved computer hitches for customers.

Miss Brandon said his suggestion of remote access to his phones was one worthy of a spy novel.

She said to him: “The reality of this is you know that if people whose views you want and whose opinions matter to you knew you were interested in men and young boys then they would cast you out.”

Renshaw replied: “That is not the case at all. The nationalist cause has gays in it. It’s just I’m not gay.”

Following his convictions for the child sex offences he was placed on the Sex Offender Register for 10 years and was told by Judge Robert Altham his 16-month jail term would start after he has completed his sentence for inciting racial hatred.

Renshaw had denied those offences, committed during a demonstration by a group named the North West Infidels on Blackpool Promenade in March 2016, and at a gathering of far-right extremists, the Yorkshire Forum For Nationalists, held the month before.

The court heard that the defendant had described Jewish people as parasites and called for them to be “eradicated” at the Yorkshire event, where he spoke to delegates from other far-right organisations.

During that sentencing hearing, Renshaw nodded his head in the dock as Judge Altham questioned whether he still held the same views as he had when he gave the two speeches.

The judge noted: “The defendant is resolute in his original views and withdraws nothing.

“He seeks to raise street armies, perpetrate violence against Jewish people and ultimately bring about genocide.”

Huff Post

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism

A 17-year-old boy from west London has pleaded guilty to terror offences linked to the neo-Nazi group Sonnenkrieg Division.

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism.

He entered guilty pleas during an Old Bailey preliminary hearing.

A court order that prevented his identification was lifted by the judge.

He will be sentenced at a later date and will next appear on 25 February.

The charges state that in August this year Dunn-Koczorowki used accounts on the Gab social media site – including one for the Sonnenkrieg Division itself – to post material that would encourage others to prepare or engage in acts of terrorism.

He will be sentenced at a later date and will next appear the Old Bailey on 25 February 2019.

A co-defendant – Michael Szewczuk, 18, from Leeds – also appeared in court, but has not yet entered pleas.

Mr Szewczuk, a Polish national, is charged with five counts of encouraging terrorism and three of disseminating terrorist publications.

A provisional trial date was fixed for 13 May 2019 at Manchester Crown Court.

Both defendants were granted conditional bail.

BBC News

A neo-Nazi couple who named their baby after Adolf Hitler and were convicted of being members of a banned terrorist group have been jailed.

Claudia Patatas and Adam Thomas were members of National Action after it was banned under terrorism laws in December 2016

Claudia Patatas and Adam Thomas were members of National Action after it was banned under terrorism laws in December 2016

Adam Thomas, 22, and Claudia Patatas, 38, from Banbury, were part of National Action and had “a long history of violent racist beliefs”, a judge said.

Birmingham Crown Court heard the couple gave their child the middle name Adolf in “admiration” of Hitler.

Thomas was jailed for six years and six months, and Patatas for five years.

In total six people were sentenced for being part of what Judge Melbourne Inman QC described as a group with “horrific aims”.

Daniel Bogunovic, 27, from Leicester, was convicted of being a member of the banned group after standing trial alongside the couple.

Described by prosecutors as a “committed National Action leader, propagandist and strategist”, he was jailed for six years and four months.

Darren Fletcher, 28, from Wolverhampton, Nathan Pryke, 27, from March, Cambridgeshire, and Joel Wilmore, 24, from Stockport, had previously pleaded guilty to being in the group.

Fletcher, described by the judge as an “extreme member”, was sentenced to five years.

Pryke, the group’s “security enforcer” was given five years and five months and Wilmore, the “banker” and “cyber security” specialist, was imprisoned for five years and 10 months.

Darren Fletcher, 28, from Wolverhampton, Nathan Pryke, 27, from March, Cambridgeshire, and Joel Wilmore, 24, from Stockport, had previously pleaded guilty to being in the group. Fletcher, described by the judge as an "extreme member", was sentenced to five years. Pryke, the group's "security enforcer" was given five years and five months and Wilmore, the "banker" and "cyber security" specialist, was imprisoned for five years and 10 months.

Darren Fletcher, 28, from Wolverhampton, Nathan Pryke, 27, from March, Cambridgeshire, and Joel Wilmore, 24, from Stockport, had previously pleaded guilty to being in the group.
Fletcher, described by the judge as an “extreme member”, was sentenced to five years.
Pryke, the group’s “security enforcer” was given five years and five months and Wilmore, the “banker” and “cyber security” specialist, was imprisoned for five years and 10 months.

Joel Wilmore (left), Nathan Pryke (centre) and Darren Fletcher admitted being in National Action before the trial began

Joel Wilmore (left), Nathan Pryke (centre) and Darren Fletcher admitted being in National Action before the trial began

The judge said of National Action: “It’s aims and objectives are the overthrow of democracy in this country by serious violence and murder and the imposition of a Nazi-style state that would eradicate whole sections of society.”

In sentencing Patatas, he added: “You were equally as extreme as Thomas both in your views and actions.

“You acted together in all you thought, said and did, in the naming of your son and the disturbing photographs of your child, surrounded by symbols of Nazism and the Ku Klux Klan.”

Thomas, a former Amazon security guard, and Patatas, a wedding photographer originally from Portugal, held hands and wept as they were sentenced.

Last week, the court heard Fletcher had trained his toddler daughter to perform a Nazi salute and sent a message to Patatas saying “finally got her to do it”.

Jurors saw images of Thomas wearing Ku Klux Klan robes while cradling his baby, which he claimed were “just play” but he admitted being a racist.

Adam Thomas said he first discovered a "fascination" with Ku Klux Klan aged 11

Thomas was also found guilty of having bomb making instructions for which he was given a two-year-and-six-month sentence which he will serve concurrently.

A police search of the home he shared with Patatas uncovered machetes, knives and crossbows – one kept just a few feet from the baby’s crib.

Extremist-themed paraphernalia including pendants, flags and clothing emblazoned with symbols of the Nazi-era SS and National Action was also recovered.

Among the items were a swastika-shaped pastry cutter and swastika scatter cushions.

    • National Action
      The group was founded in 2013 by Ben Raymond, now 29, and Alex Davies, now 24It was intended to be an explicitly neo-Nazi party

      Raymond was a politics graduate from the University of Essex, and Davies was a Welsh former member of the British National Party

      National Action shunned democratic politics, regarding itself instead as a youth-based street movement

      It is believed it never had more than 100 members

      Its activities involved leafleting university campuses, aggressive publicity stunts and city-centre demonstrations

      In 2015, 25-year-old member Zack Davies used a hammer and machete to attack a Sikh dentist and was jailed for attempted murder

      After the murder of Jo Cox in 2016, an official National Action Twitter account posted: “Only 649 MPs to go #WhiteJihad”

      The group was banned later that year after the government concluded it was “concerned in terrorism”

      It became the first far-right group to be proscribed in this country since World War Two

Fletcher was close friends with Thomas and Patatas

Fletcher was close friends with Thomas and Patatas

Barnaby Jameson QC, prosecuting, said the defendants had taken part in National Action’s chat groups, posting comments that showed “virulent racism, particularly from Thomas, Patatas and Fletcher”.

He added: “Leaders Pryke, Wilmore and Bogunovic were more circumspect in their views but on occasion the true depth of their racial hatred leeched out.”

He said a deleted Skype log recovered from Thomas’s laptop stated that the “Midlands branch” of the neo-Nazi group would “continue the fight alone” after National Action disbanded after it was outlawed under anti-terror legislation in 2016.

BBC News

Joel Wilmore, 24, is originally from Lincolnshire

Joel Wilmore, 24, is originally from Lincolnshire


An IT worker and former Army reservist from Lincolnshire has pleaded guilty to joining a terrorist group.

Joel Wilmore has admitted being a member of the extreme right-wing organisation National Action, which was banned in 2016.

The 24-year-old called Muslims an “infection on western civilisation”, adding “they deserve the fire and brand just as much as the Jews” during a conversation on Telegram messenger in February 2017.

He was due to stand trial alongside other members of the group at Birmingham Crown Court on Monday, November 12, but pleaded guilty before the court case began.

He will now be sentenced in a two-day hearing beginning on Friday, December 14.

Mikko Vehvilainen

Mikko Vehvilainen

Wilmore will also be sentenced for possession of a terrorist document called Homemade Molotov Cocktails.

The IT worker, who used to live in the county but was not here at the time of the offences, was one of several group members busted by police.

These included serving British soldier Mikko Vehvilainen, who also has links to Lincolnshire, according to the Daily Mail.

Adam Thomas, 22, and Claudia Patatas, 38, were found guilty at the trial on Monday of being members of the group.

The crown court was told the couple had given their child the middle name “Adolf”, which Thomas said was in “admiration” of Hitler, and had Swastika scatter cushions in their home.

Photographs recovered from their home also showed Thomas cradling his new-born son while wearing the hooded white robes of a Ku Klux Klansman.

In conversation with another National Action member, Patatas said “all Jews must be put to death,” while Thomas had once told his partner he “found that all non-whites are intolerable”.

Former Amazon security guard Thomas and Patatas, a wedding photographer originally from Portugal who also wanted to “bring back concentration camps”, were found guilty after a seven-week trial.

A third defendant – a leading member in National Action’s Midlands chapter, Daniel Bogunovic, 27, of Crown Hills Rise, Leicester – was also convicted of membership.

Jurors heard he already had a conviction from earlier this year for stirring up racial hatred after being part of a group that plastered a Birmingham university with offensive National Action stickers.

Thomas, a twice-failed Army applicant, was also convicted on a majority verdict of having a terrorist manual which jurors heard contained instructions on making “viable” bombs.

Adam Thomas, 22, who has been convicted at Birmingham Crown Court of membership of neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action

Adam Thomas, 22, who has been convicted at Birmingham Crown Court of membership of neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action

Following the lifting of legal restrictions, details can only now be reported of how Vehvilainen, 34, and National Action’s Midlands organiser Deakin, 24, were both convicted of membership back in March.

Both were later jailed at Birmingham Crown Court for eight years and were the first members of the banned organisation to be convicted under terrorism legislation.

Deakin and Vehvilainen, who was thrown out of the Army on conviction, had been members of private chat groups alongside Patatas, Thomas and Bogunovic, discussing the group’s operations.

In a chat involving Thomas, Fletcher, Pryke, Patatas, Vehvilainen and Wilmore, in February 2017 – two months after the ban – Deakin was telling his fellow members: “All Jews need burning – it’s symbolic.”

In another chat, on March 30, Vehvilainen told his comrades: “These things will be decided when we have won the war against the Jews, deported the muds (Muslims), and cleansed our lands.”

During the Thomas-Patatas trial, a photograph was shown of Fletcher performing a Nazi-style salute in the couple’s lounge, as Patatas smiled and cradled her baby.

Bogunovic

Bogunovic

More images from what prosecutors called the “the Thomas-Patatas family album” showed Thomas brandishing a machete in front of a Ku Klux Klan (KKK) flag in the lounge.

Another photo showed him with a powerful crossbow – one of two found inside the house – while police found a makeshift firing range in their yard.

One of the crossbows was found under the couple’s bed, a few feet from the baby’s crib, along with an axe in a sheath.

During two police searches at their home, officers also recovered further weapons from an “extensive” arsenal, including two machetes, one with a serrated 18in (46cm) blade, in their first-floor bedroom.

Alexander Deakin, 24, who it can now be reported was convicted of membership of a terrorist group at an earlier trial in March

Alexander Deakin, 24, who it can now be reported was convicted of membership of a terrorist group at an earlier trial in March

The couple also had a National Action poster stuck to their fridge reading “Britain is ours – the rest must go”, and a pastry-cutter shaped like a Swastika, kept in a kitchen cupboard.

There was also a Christmas card on the sideboard showing three robed KKK figures and the message “may all your Christmases be white”.

In a message to “vehement Nazi” Fletcher, Patatas said “all Jews must be put to death”, while Thomas, originally from Kingshurst Road, Birmingham, told his partner, “all non-whites are intolerable”.

Nathan Pryke

Nathan Pryke

Fletcher, of Kitchen Lane, Wednesfield, Wolverhampton, was jailed for a year in 2014 for stirring up racial hatred after posting a video in which he dressed as a Klansman, and hanged a golliwog from a stage at a white supremacy event in Wales.

He was later jailed again for eight months for posting racist remarks online in 2015.

Thomas, a Holocaust-denier, told police he had held white supremacist views from the age of 11, and his stepfather was a member of white power band Skrewdriver.

However, it emerged during the trial that Thomas had travelled to Israel aged 18, where he lived for nearly two years.

He had considered converting to Judaism, he told jurors, despite also telling his trial that he believed the issue of whether the Holocaust happened or not was “complicated”.

Darren Fletcher, 28, who admitted membership of neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action

Darren Fletcher, 28, who admitted membership of neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action

National Action was banned by the Government in December 2016, as “a racist, anti-Semitic and homophobic organisation”, in part because of its members’ support for the killer of MP Jo Cox, Thomas Mair.

In one message, Fletcher had said: “Mair had the right idea.”

During a conversation on Telegram messenger in February 2017, Thomas and Fletcher talked of “bumping off” MPs.

In the same conversation, Wilmore called Muslims an “infection on western civilisation”, adding “they deserve the fire and brand just as much as the Jews”.

Jurors heard evidence of more social media chats involving Thomas, Patatas and Bogunovic, discussing what prosecutors have alleged was National Action’s continuing operation, under a different name.

Pryke, who railed against “Jews” in the chats – and cleared his incriminating message logs every night – spoke with Thomas of a forthcoming “race war”.

Thomas, in a Skype message just days after the ban, said: “F***ing traitors. Midlands will continue the fight alone.”

Jurors also heard how Thomas and Patatas plastered National Action stickers in public locations after the ban, while Bogunovic was calling for a “leadership” meeting in a chat group for senior members in April 2017.

Barnaby Jameson QC, prosecuting, said National Action had simply “shed one skin for another” by “re-branding” in order to evade the law.

In his trial opening, Mr Jameson said: “They were fanatical, highly motivated, energetic, closely-linked and mobile.

“And they all had, we say, a similar interest in ethnic cleansing, with violence if necessary, and the evidence in this case, we say, speaks for itself.”

Trial judge the Recorder of Birmingham Melbourne Inman QC told Bogunovic, Patatas and Thomas they and the three men who admitted membership prior to trial would be sentenced together in a two-day hearing beginning on Friday, December 14, and concluding on the Monday.

Turning to the jury, who deliberated for more than 12 hours, the judge added: “Thank you very much for your hard work.”

The three will be sentenced alongside Wilmore, 24, of Bramhall Road, Stockport, Greater Manchester, and goods drivers Pryke, of Dartford Road, March, Cambridge and Fletcher.

Wilmore will also be sentenced for possession of a terrorist document.

Patatas, who was bailed pending sentencing, left court without comment.

Following the convictions, West Midlands Police chief superintendent Matt Ward said that “National Action, the Midlands chapter… is no more”.

He added: “We’ve been able to dismantle one terrorist cell operating in the Midlands. It doesn’t mean there won’t be others, and it doesn’t mean they won’t adopt different names and identities going forward.”

Lincolnshire Live

Thomas - Patatas - Bogunovic

Thomas – Patatas – Bogunovic

Six people have been convicted of being members of the banned extreme right wing neo-Nazi group National Action.

The organisation was formed in 2013 and proscribed as a banned group by the government in 2016.

A jury at Birmingham Crown Court found two men and a woman guilty today after three other men had admitted membership of the group before the trial.

Daniel Bogunovic, aged 27 of Crown Hills Rise, Leicester, Adam Thomas, aged 22, and 38-year-old Claudia Patatas − both of Waltham Gardens, Banbury, Oxfordshire − were all found guilty this morning.

Joel Wilmore, aged 24 of Bramhall Moor Lane, Stockport, Darren Fletcher, aged 28 of Kitchen Lane, Wednesfield, Wolverhampton and Nathan Pryke, aged 27 of Dartford Road, March, Cambridge, all previously admitted their membership.

Wilmore - Fletcher - Pryke

Wilmore – Fletcher – Pryke

They will be sentenced in due course.

All six were arrested on 3 January and charged on 8 January with being concerned in the commission, preparation and instigation of acts of terrorism under Section 41 of the Terrorism Act 2000; namely on suspicion of being a member of a proscribed organisation (National Action) contrary to sec 11 of the Terrorism Act.

Thomas was also found guilty of possessing information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism contrary to s.58 of Terrorism Act 2000 (possessing bomb making instructions).

Bogunvic was found guilty of inciting racial hatred under Sec 18 (1) of the Public Order Act 1986 after National Action branded stickers were found displayed in the grounds of the Aston University complex in July 2016.

Joel Wilmore also pleaded guilty to possessing information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism contrary to s.58 of Terrorism Act 2000 (possessing bomb making instructions).

Darren Fletcher pleaded guilty to five breaches of his criminal anti-social behaviour order.

The court heard how the group used several methods to disguise their contact with each other such as using pseudonyms through closed, encrypted messaging platforms as well as regularly meeting in person to spread their ideology.

Top to bottom and left to right: Thomas in KKK robes holding son; Thomas with knife; Patatas & Thomas with son; Fletcher, Thomas & Patatas; Thomas & Fletcher; Thomas with crossbow

Top to bottom and left to right: Thomas in KKK robes holding son; Thomas with knife; Patatas & Thomas with son; Fletcher, Thomas & Patatas; Thomas & Fletcher; Thomas with crossbow

Talking about today’s verdict, head of West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit (WMCTU) Detective Chief Superintendent Matt Ward, said: “This result is a culmination of two years of painstaking work in the West Midlands and across the country to recognise and understand the threat of National Action.

“These individuals were not simply racist fantasists; we now know they were a dangerous, well-structured organisation. Their aim was to spread neo-Nazi ideology by provoking a race war in the UK and they had spent years acquiring the skills to carry this out. They had researched how to make explosives. They had gathered weapons. They had a clear structure to radicalise others. Unchecked they would have inspired violence and spread hatred and fear across the West Midlands.

“Today’s convictions have dealt a significant blow to National Action. We have dismantled their Midlands Chapter but that doesn’t mean the threat they pose will go away.

“Others on the periphery will take on leadership roles and so I ask for the public’s vigilance − if you see this group’s posters or stickers please report them to police − where there are new cells, we will intercept and prosecute them.”

Two men were convicted and sentenced earlier this year also for membership of National Action − Mikko Vehvilainen and Alex Deakin − however due to legal reasons restrictions were placed on reporting.

Vehvilainen - Deakin

Vehvilainen – Deakin

Vehvilainen − a 34-year-old lance corporal in the army − was jailed for eight years in April. Born in Finland, Vehvilainen was arrested by officers from West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit (WMCTU) at his army base in Brecon, Powys in September 2017.

At an earlier hearing, Vehvilainen admitted a separate offence of being in possession of pepper spray.

Det Ch Supt Ward said: “Vehvilainen’s role typified the progress that National Action wanted; he was a non-commissioned officer in the British Army with access to young men who could be radicalised and recruited into the group. He was an incredibly dangerous individual and a key part of the National Action strategy.”

Alex Deakin (24) was also jailed for eight years for being a member of National Action, distributing extremist publications and two charges of possessing documents likely to be useful to a person preparing to commit an act of terrorism and distribution of a terrorist publication.

Top: Vehvilainen pictured performing Nazi salute Bottom left: Deakin and right: Vehvilainen's weaponry

Top: Vehvilainen pictured performing Nazi salute Bottom left: Deakin and right: Vehvilainen’s weaponry

Matt Ward continued: “Deakin had a long history with the far right movement, he held the mantle of regional coordinator to help facilitate online communications in the group. He turned it into a well organised cell in the midlands and as a result he’s serving a long sentence.

“Today’s guilty verdicts highlight the commitment by counter terrorism policing to tackle all forms of extremist ideology.

“We have seen many convictions over the past few years in connection with Syria-related terrorism and this work continues apace. But extreme groups such as National Action also have the potential to threaten public safety and security.

“We work tirelessly to counter terrorism. Our absolute priority is to ensure the safety and security of the people who live, work and visit the West Midlands area.

“If anyone has any suspicions over an individual’s behaviour and suspects them to be involved in this type of activity, I would urge you to report it to police as soon as possible. You can report suspicions online via ACT campaign’s website or call police confidentially on 0800 789 321. In an emergency dial 999.

“Suspicious activity is anything that seems out of place, unusual or just doesn’t seem to fit in with day-to-day life – Let us decide if it is important.”

West Midlands Police