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Andrew Emery, of Bentilee, ‘let his fingers run away with him’ on day of the Ariana Grande One Love tribute concert

Drunken Andrew Emery has been jailed after he made public posts on Facebook calling for ‘mosques to be burned’ in the aftermath of the Manchester bombing.

The 45-year-old dad ‘let his fingers run away with him’ on the day of the One Love tribute concert organised by singer Ariana Grande last summer.

He posted, ‘It is time we started to fight back. The Government won’t do **** because of the PC brigade. Every time we have a terrorist attack we should burn a mosque’.

Three hours later he posted, ‘To all the British murderers and serial killers out there, do us all a favour and concentrate on the Muslim community’.

A further post read, ‘Burn a mosque today and feel better’.

His posts could be read by the wider public and he was arrested after a complaint was made to Humberside Police.

Andrew Emery was jailed after admitting stirring up religious hatred on Facebook

Andrew Emery was jailed after admitting stirring up religious hatred on Facebook

Now Emery has been jailed for two years at Stoke-on-Trent Crown Court.

Prosecutor Harpreet Sandhu said the comments came on June 4 last year, the day of a tribute concert following the Manchester MEN Arena bombing on May 22 in which 22 concert-goers were killed.

Mr Sandhu said: “The defendant posted, ‘It is time we started to fight back. The Government won’t do **** because of the PC brigade. Every time we have a terrorist attack we should burn a mosque, preferably when it is full’.

“Three hours later the defendant posted, ‘To all the British murderers and serial killers out there, ‘Do us all a favour and concentrate on the Muslim community’.

“He later posted in capital letters, ‘Burn a mosque today and feel better’.”

Mr Sandhu said the defendant’s posts were not confined to his 157 Facebook friends and could be seen by the wider public. The posts led to a member of the public contacting Humberside Police on June 4.

Mr Sandhu added that the posts were not isolated and Emery had made comments on previous dates including, ‘Trump had the right idea trying to stop Muslims entering his country. Maybe we should do it so we would only have to worry about the scum already here’.

The defendant told police he had posted ‘stupid comments’ on Facebook. He added he was not a racist.

Emery, of Aylesbury Road, Bentilee, pleaded guilty to three charges of publishing or distributing written material intending to stir up religious hatred.

Brian Williams, mitigating, conceded the defendant’s comments were ‘abhorrent’.

He said Emery is a hard-working family man and has a teenage daughter who is an Ariana Grande fan.

Mr Williams said: “She wanted to go to the concert but they could not afford to send her.

“At the time he drank too much and his father had just been diagnosed as terminally ill. These offences post date the terrible explosion in Manchester and there was the added factor his daughter could have been there.

“Without thinking rationally he allowed these appalling comments to pour out. He would not have gone in a pub or stood on a street corner and said such things.

“His fingers ran away with him. They were faster than his brain.”

Recorder John Butterfield QC told Emery his posts did a great disservice to those injured and killed in the arena bombing.

He said the defendant’s previous posts demonstrated that the three charges he pleaded guilty to were not isolated or uncharacteristic.

Recorder Butterfield QC said the offences were aggravated by the fact the posts advocated fatal violence, they were widely available to the public and they occurred at such a sensitive time.

He added: “They were hot on the heels of the London Bridge/Borough Market incident on June 3, the day before the tribute concert.”

Stoke Sentinel

An inquest date has been set after Crehan died five months into a year-long jail sentence

A prisoner who was serving time for putting bacon on the door handles of a Bristol mosque died after a drug overdose, it has been revealed.

Kevin ‘Bunny’ Crehan was five-months into his year-long sentence in Horfield Prison when he was discovered dead in his cell.

Emergency services were called to the prison on December 27, 2016 after he was found unresponsive.

Files from the police and a post-mortem report have now been completed after several pre-inquest reviews.

A full inquest will begin on Monday, December 3, and is expected to last more than two weeks.

That means it will be nearly two years before his family finds out how the 35-year-old from Knowle West came by his death.

A post mortem examination heard he had died of a suspected overdose of methadone, a common drug used as a strong painkiller and as a substitute for heroin.

The court was told he had been admitted to hospital while serving his term following a drug overdose.

After he recovered, he was sent back behind bars, but was found dead in his cell shortly after.

A police investigation has now been completed, and they are not treating it as suspicious at this time.

Why was he in prison?

Crehan had been jailed in July 2016 after pleading guilty to an attack on the Jamia mosque in Totterdown in January 2016.

The ‘protest’ saw bacon being placed on door handles, a St George flag tied to the fence and abuse shouted at two elderly people.

Together with three others, the far-right group were charged in court.

Crehan was jailed for a year while Mark Bennett, 48, from Patchway, was sentenced to nine months in prison.

His wife, Alison, 46, was given a six-month suspended sentence for her involvement and Angela Swales, 31, from Brislington, was given a four-month suspended jail term.

The judge who jailed Crehan said he had taken into account the 35-year-old’s history of convictions, including football-related violence.

The group has also been given restraining orders banning them from going within 100 metres of a mosque anywhere in England or Wales for 10 years.

In his summing up, Judge Julian Lambert called it “an attack on England and the principles of freedom of religion”.

Since Crehan died nearly 18 months ago, there has been mounting speculation about the circumstances surrounding his death.

And while police dismissed it as “not suspicious”, it has not stopped several groups of people coming to Bristol to protest his death and sentence.

The latest march took place in Bristol at the end of last month, with dozens joining the ‘Gays against Sharia’ march near Temple Meads.

The Prison and Probation Ombudsman has confirmed a report into Crehan’s death has been concluded and passed to the coroner, although that is not expected to be made public until after the inquest.

Sitting in front of Avon’s senior coroner Maria Voisin, the inquest will look into the circumstances surrounding Crehan’s death, including how and why he died.

Bristol Post

Gavin Fowler called for the “extermination” of all Muslims on newspaper Facebook page.

A man who posted pro-Hitler comments on a newspaper forum has been fined £1000.

Gavin Fowler posted online abuse calling for the “extermination” of all Muslims after permission was granted to build a new mosque in Perth.

He posted the comment on a local newspaper web forum during a debate about a proposed march against the mosque by the Scottish Defence League.

Fowler, 60, said he wished Adolf Hitler would return and lead the cull.

Sheriff Lindsay Foulis said: “It would be bad enough if this comment had come from someone in their teens or early 20s.

“It would still be extremely offensive, but at least it might be put down to ignorance.

“But being the age you are, born in the 1950s, I find it hard to believe you would not have a modicum of knowledge of recent history.

“It was published in a way that others would read it and without thinking that they might be influenced by it.”

Fowler admitted posting a bigoted message aggravated by religious prejudice on August 4 last year when he appeared at Perth Sheriff Court on Wednesday.

Defence solicitor Linda Clark said: “He acts impulsively and without thinking through the consequences of his behaviour to himself or others.

“He is genuinely remorseful and embarrassed by his conduct. He is 60 and has never come to the attention of the police or the court before.”

STV

Building plan fired up opposition

The SDL took to the streets of Perth in September last year

The SDL took to the streets of Perth in September last year

A hate-filled message was posted on the Perthshire Advertiser’s Facebook page after councillors backed controversial plans for a new mosque in Perth for the local Muslim community.

Perth Sheriff Court was told that 59-year-old Gavin Fowler had stated: “I would bring back Hitler to exterminate these vermin of the earth.”

The comment was branded “highly offensive and inflammatory” by Sheriff Derek Reekie.

And he has called for a background report on the accused, of Lumsden Crescent, Almondbank, before he decides his fate.

The content of the post was reported to the police and led to Fowler being charged with sending a “grossly offensive religious comment.”

He initially denied the charge and was to have faced trial on March 6.

But he changed his plea to guilty – and will be sentenced on March 21 after a Community Justice Social Work report has been obtained.

The council decision to give the green light to the mosque, in the city’s Jeanfield Road, sparked opposition from the Scottish Defence League.

Around 50 far right supporters subsequently arrived in Perth in September, protesting against the planning bid by the Perth Islamic Society to move from their current site in Glasgow Road to a former builder’s yard.

But the far right group was met by more than 1000 anti-fascist protesters.

Fowler, who was represented at the court hearing by local solicitor Billy Somerville, admitted sending the religiously prejudiced comment to the PA’s Facebook page from his home on August 4 last year.

He admitted that the message was grossly offensive or of an indecent, obscene or menacing character.

The charge indicated that the offence was “aggravated by religious prejudice.”

Depute fiscal Robbie Brown said the grant of planning consent for the mosque had prompted demonstrations by certain organisations.

After hearing the comment, Sheriff Reekie in view of the nature of the remarks, said he needed a report to “determine the appropriate disposal.”

Mr Somerville will give his plea in mitigation next month.

Fowler had his bail continued meantime.

A spokesperson for Perth Against Racism, the group who organised the counter-demonstration against the SDL last year, said: “Unfortunately we live in a society in which some people feel that it is okay to make remarks and post comments on social media platforms that are racially abusive. Remarks and comments that would perhaps not be made face-to-face.

“Thankfully, because of the efforts of individuals, communities, and socially progressive groups such as Perth Against Racism, the state, the law, and the police are required to address online racial abuse. Perth Against Racism hopes that this case will make people think twice about posting racially-motivated abuse.”
Daily Record

A NAZI-sympathiser who threatened to petrol bomb mosques after the Manchester Arena attack and who had an array of medieval weapons at his home has been jailed for eight years.

Hitler-obsessive Liam Seabrook, 31, told his probation officer he planned to kill Muslims in a series of text messages four days after 22 people were murdered at the Ariana Grande concert.

Hitler-obsessive Liam Seabrook, 31, told his probation officer he planned to kill Muslims in a series of text messages four days after 22 people were murdered at the Ariana Grande concert.

The judge at Teesside Crown Court branded him “dangerous” and imposed an extended sentence.

When police went to his home in Thornaby, Teesside, they found petrol in washing up liquid bottles and crude home-made wooden weapons with screws and razor blades sticking out of them.

One was likened by Paul Abrahams, prosecuting, to a fasces – a weapon carried by Roman magistrates made from sticks with blades attached.

He said the weapons were adapted to cause “significant injuries” and were “medieval style weaponry”.

When police went to Liam Seabrook’s home crude home-made wooden weapons with screws and razor blades sticking out of them

Some were located close to his front door, the court heard.

When cable ties were found at Seabrook’s flat, he explained he had them “in case he needed to kidnap somebody”, Mr Abrahams said.

The chilling texts were sent in response to a routine inquiry from his probation officer.

He told her: “After Monday (the day of the Manchester bombing), Muslims and mosques need to be petrol bombed.”

She asked if he intended to carry out the threat, and Seabrook replied: “If something happens, something happens. By that time it would be (too late) to be stopped, like the Muslim attack on Manchester.”

Bizarrely, he then told her he had passed a forklift drivers’ course.

Mr Abrahams said Seabrook sent racist texts and expressed views about killing Muslims.

Psychiatrists found later he was fascinated by the Third Reich and Hitler in particular.

He had a previous conviction for arson, writing racist graffiti and leaving a note in a library calling for immigrants to be banned from using it.

Alex Bousfield, defending, said there was no suggestion Seabrook had ever taken his weapons out of his flat and that they were more like “bizarre ornaments”.

Seabrook was isolated and stockpiled goods so he would not have to leave his home, the court heard.

Mr Bousfield said: “He has really seen the outside world through media reports and he has picked and chosen those he has taken on board.

“He has become fearful of almost anyone except white males, really.”

Seabrook, who has been diagnosed with a mixed personality disorder, admitted making threats to kill, malicious communication, making threats to destroy property and having articles with intent to destroy property.

He was sentenced via a videolink from prison.

Judge Simon Bourne-Arton sentenced Seabrook to eight years custody with an extended two year licence period.

After deeming him dangerous, the judge said: “The weapons were very basic, nevertheless of a very violent type which could have resulted in extreme injury, if not death, if put to use.”

He made an order banning Seabrook from going within 200 metres of a mosque when he is released and said Seabrook had a long history of espousing right wing ideology.

Sharon Elves, of the Crown Prosecution Service, said: “Liam Seabrook made a clear threat to burn down mosques and attack Muslims in what he believed was ‘retaliation’ for terrorist attacks that had occurred within the UK in previous months.

“From the cache of homemade weapons found at his home, including clubs covered with razor blades and bottles of carefully mixed accelerant for starting fires, it was also clear that he possessed the means to carry out his threat.

“The Crown Prosecution Service has worked closely with Cleveland Police to build a robust case against Liam Seabrook, leaving him with little option but to plead guilty to these very serious offences.”

Detective Constable Gerri Harris, from Stockton Operational Crime Team, said: “The sentence today sends a clear warning that if you make threats to harm people and create dangerous weapons in order to do so, there will be serious consequences.

“Liam Seabrook is clearly a dangerous man and the fact that he will remain in prison means that the public are protected from him for some time.”

Northern Echo

Osborne tells the court ‘God bless you all, thank you’ after beng sentenced to minimum term of 43 years

Darren Osborne was found guilty of murder and attempted murder, at Woolwich Crown Court

Darren Osborne was found guilty of murder and attempted murder, at Woolwich Crown Court


Darren Osborne has been jailed for life – with a minimum term of 43 years – for carrying out the Finsbury Park terror attack.

Justice Cheema-Grubb said she had not given Osborne a rare full-life term because he did not achieve his original aim to kill multiple victims at a pro-Palestinian march.

“This was a terror attack,” the judge said, adding that the Metropolitan Police’s security arrangements around the Al-Quds Day rally had “saved many lives”.

“You were rapidly radicalised…by material put on the internet by those determined to spread hatred of Muslims.”

Sentencing Osborne to two concurrent life sentences with a minimum term of 43 years, minus the 224 days already served in custody, she said his lengthy criminal record betrayed a “belligerent and violent character”.

Osborne showed no emotion while being sentenced, but as he was led away told the court: “God bless you all, thank you.”

A jury had found the 48-year-old guilty of murder and attempted murder at the end of a nine-day trial, dismissing what the judge called a “pathetic last-ditch attempt to deceive them” by claiming a man called Dave was behind the wheel.

Woolwich Crown Court had heard how Makram Ali, a 51-year-old grandfather, had collapsed just two minutes before the atrocity shortly after midnight on 19 June.

A crowd of Muslim worshippers, several of them wearing traditional clothing, gathered around him to help and became an unwitting target for Osborne as he looped around Finsbury Park in search of a mosque.

Woolwich Crown Court heard that Osborne has a criminal history spanning 30 years, which could not previously be disclosed because it could prejudice the jury.

Prosecutor Jonathan Rees QC said he had appeared in court for 33 times for 102 offences dating back to when he was just 15 years old.

He has served multiple prison sentences for crimes including assault and has also been convicted of drug possession, burglary, theft, fraud, vehicle crime, public order offences

Mr Rees said Osborne had eight years where he was “relatively trouble free” around the birth of his first child, but was later convicted for shoplifting and theft in South Wales.

Lisa Wilding QC, Osborne’s barrister, had urged the judge not to use a whole-life term warranted by his motivations.

“Although this case has been properly characterised as an act of terror, it’s arguably not the most grave of its type,” she told the court.

Ms Wilding highlighted the fact that Osborne was a functioning alcoholic with a troubled past, saying the previous convictions had no racial element and he ”became radicalised in a short period of time“.

Mr Ali’s relatives were in court for the sentencing hearing, where his wife, six children and two grandchildren told how they were unable to fully grieve until the end of the gruelling trial.

His eldest daughter, Ruzina Akhtar, said she had been “struggling not to fall apart” since the attack.

In a statement, she described how the family faced an agonising wait for Mr Ali’s death to be confirmed.

“In our hearts we knew it was him involved and that he was gone,” Ms Akhtar said. “My heart was shattered when I saw my father’s body in the morgue.”

She told how the family live near the scene of the attack and are traumatised from passing it on a daily basis, while her mother fears leaving the house or sleeping alone.

“My mum is scared of going out by herself and being attacked because she is visibly a Muslim and wears a headscarf,” she added.

Ms Akhtar paid tribute to her father as a “family man”, saying he spent his final moments before leaving the house on the night of his death with his wife and children, who are as young as 13.

He was beloved by her five-year-old son, who “is always asking where his granddad is and why he can’t go to the park with him every day” like they used to.

Ms Akhtar said her father was the most “sincere and warm person” she knew, who lived his life without enemies, adding: “My father will never be forgotten, he will always stay in our hearts, his laughter will echo from the walls in our home and his smile will be reflected in our eyes.”

Statements from the survivors of the attack told how they suffer from physical injuries as well as nightmares, flashbacks, insomnia and other effects of trauma have had a terrible impact on their personal lives and work.

They described chased Osborne down after he crashed the van and stumbled out of the driver’s seat, telling how he smiled and said: “I’ve done my job, you can kill me now.”

A note found in the vehicle – scribbled down in a pub the night before – showed Osborne raging against Muslims, grooming gangs, Jeremy Corbyn, Sadiq Khan and Lily Allen.

He denied charges of murder and attempted murder but submitted no statement in his defence until Friday – after hearing five days of evidence proving his guilt.

Police believe Osborne was radicalised in under a month, sparking calls for internet companies and the security services to combat extremist material even if it does not violate terror laws.
The Independent

Darren Osborne was found guilty of murder and attempted murder, at Woolwich Crown Court

Darren Osborne was found guilty of murder and attempted murder, at Woolwich Crown Court

A man who drove a van into a crowd of Muslims near a north London mosque has been sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum term of 43 years behind bars.

Darren Osborne, 48, was found guilty of murdering Makram Ali, 51, after deliberately ploughing into a crowd of people in Finsbury Park in June.

Mrs Justice Cheema-Grubb said Osborne, from Cardiff, had planned “a suicide mission” and expected to be shot dead.

“This was a terrorist attack – you intended to kill,” the judge told him.

Osborne, who had been found guilty of murder and attempted murder, said “God bless you all, thank you”, as he was led away from court.

‘Malevolent hatred’

The father-of-four mowed down worshippers in Finsbury Park shortly after 12.15am on 19 June last year, killing Mr Ali and injuring nine others.

The jury took an hour to return the verdict at Woolwich Crown Court on Thursday after a nine-day trial.

Justice Cheema-Grubb told Osborne the jury in his trial had seen though his “pathetic last-ditch attempt to deceive them”.

She said he was “rapidly radicalised over the internet by those determined to spread hatred of Muslims”.

“Your use of Twitter exposed you to racists and anti-Islamic ideology,” she added.

“In short, you allowed your mind to be poisoned by those who claimed to be leaders.”

Before sentencing, the court heard a statement from Razina Akhtar, the daughter of Mr Ali, who said she had suffered “recurring nightmares” since the death of her father.

“The incident was near to our house and I walk past it most days. It keeps me awake at night thinking about the attack.”

She said her mother, Mr Ali’s widow, was now scared to go outside by herself for fear of being attacked.

“My father was the most sincere and warmest person I know. He was full of jokes and laughter, and full of love for his family and grandchildren.

“His life was taken in a cruel way by a narrow-minded, heartless being,” the statement added.

Other witness suffered feelings of anxiety, flashbacks, fear of going out and loss of confidence, prosecutors said.

Mrs Justice Cheema-Grubb also heard a list of Osborne’s previous convictions – including a string of violent offences – spanning more than 30 years.

Osborne had appeared before the courts on 33 occasions for 102 offences, she was told.

The judge said Osborne’s previous convictions showed he was a “belligerent and violent character”.

She said Mr Ali died immediately after being struck by the van. He was found with tyre marks on his torso, she added.

‘Obsessed’ with Muslims

The trial heard the victims had been outside the Muslim Welfare House, in Finsbury Park, when the area had been busy with worshippers attending Ramadan prayers.

Mr Ali had collapsed at the roadside in the minutes before the attack.

Police later found a letter in the van written by Osborne, referring to Muslim people as “rapists” and “feral”.

He also wrote that Muslim men were “preying on our children”.

Osborne, the trial heard, had became “obsessed” with Muslims in the weeks leading up to the attack, having watched the BBC drama Three Girls, about the Rochdale grooming scandal.

BBC News