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A 26-year-old Missouri man pleaded guilty to a terrorism charge Thursday for bringing an Amtrak train to a stop in southwest Nebraska last October and sending passengers into a panic.

Taylor M. Wilson, of St. Charles, Missouri, also pleaded guilty to possessing an unregistered 9 mm CZ Scorpion EVO 3 S1 rifle, one of several guns FBI agents found in a search of his home, as part of a plea agreement with prosecutors there.

Several other counts will be dismissed at his sentencing Oct. 5.

“Why did you stop it (the train)?” Magistrate Judge Cheryl Zwart asked Wilson at his plea hearing Thursday.

“I was high,” Wilson answered.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Lesley Woods said Wilson had a mask, hammer, knife, a loaded .38-caliber gun, a box of ammunition and a National Socialist Movement business card on him when he got into an secure area of the train and cut the lights to the train.

She said train employees were running up and down the aisles attempting to determine the cause of the emergency stop. Some passengers, in fear, attempted to escape through the train’s windows.

When Amtrak workers found Wilson in the engineer’s seat of the follow engine playing with the controls, he claimed to be the new conductor, Woods said.

He later told investigators he had dropped acid right before, she said.

The conductor and others subdued Wilson, then held him and waited for sheriffs’ deputies from Furnas and Harlan counties to arrive in Oxford, 23 miles southwest of Holdrege.

In body-cam video of him being disarmed by deputies, Wilson was caught making shooting sounds at deputies and the conductor.

None of the 175 people aboard the eastbound California Zephyr were injured.

But he ultimately was indicted federally — in Nebraska and Missouri — after learning he had links to a white supremacist group and had expressed an interest in “killing black people,” according to an informant.

Woods said a search of his Missouri home in December turned up a cache of unregistered firearms (including a machine gun and short-barreled rifle), Mein Kampf and a shield with a swastika on it, pressure plates used to make explosive devices and writings about ISIS.

She said Wilson had planned to travel to Syria to fight with ISIS and bought a plane ticket but never used it. Wilson denied it.

According to the written plea agreement, he told a deputy after his arrest: “I was going to save the train from the black people.”

Wilson faces up to life in prison for threatening to disable railroad on-track equipment and a mass transportation vehicle in the Nebraska case and up to 10 years for possession of an unregistered firearm in the Missouri case.

After the hearing, Wilson’s parents, who were in the back of the courtroom, told him they loved him.

“You did well,” his mom said as a guard ushered him out.

In the hallway, Omaha attorney Jerry Sena said at sentencing he plans to argue that given Wilson’s limited criminal record he should be sentenced within the range of nine to 11 years.

Wilson is being held at the Saline County jail in Wilber.

Journal Star

Taylor Michael Wilson, a white supremacist, attacked an Amtrak train with 175 passengers aboard.

An armed white supremacist who brought an Amtrak train passing through Nebraska to a screeching halt after setting off an emergency brake pleaded guilty to a federal terrorism-related charge on Thursday.

Taylor Michael Wilson admitted in a plea deal with federal prosecutors that he was armed with a .380 caliber handgun and National Socialist Movement identification cards when he entered a secure compartment of an Amtrak train, disabled the train and cut the lights back in October. As part of the agreement with federal prosecutors, Wilson will also plead guilty to a count of receipt and possession of an unregistered firearm.

When conductors subdued the defendant, Wilson said, “I’m the conductor now, bitch!” and reached for his waistband, according to the agreement. The attack happened in a part of the state so remote that it took deputies an hour to arrive at the scene. There were 175 passengers aboard the train at the time.

Wilson’s plea deal included additional revelations that weren’t previously disclosed. Wilson was caught on a body camera making shooting sounds at deputies, and he used racial slurs and insults against the conductor. He also said that human beings were “a plague” on the planet.

“I got a reason for doing what I’m doing. I stopped the fucking train,” he said. “I was going to save the train from the black people.” The plea agreement also says that Wilson quoted Friedrich Nietzsche.

A search of Wilson’s home outside of St. Louis found “hollowed out” portions of walls where he concealed “propaganda relating to the National Socialist movement, body armor, ammunition, and pressure plates that can be used to make an explosive device.” Some of the weapons, including a fully automatic machine gun and a short-barrel rifle, were illegal to posses under federal law.

The government also seized some of Wilson’s handwritten papers, including one that read “National Socialism: Victory of Death!” They also found journals full of “numerous derogatory and threatening comments about the Jewish race and African Americans” as well as writings about the defendant’s “frustrations with the American government, society, and the media.”

The plea agreement says that Wilson told a cellmate that he “dropped acid” right before he entered the secure part of the train. The Lincoln Journal Star reported that Wilson told a judge he was “high” at the time he stopped the train. His attorney said he hoped for a sentence in the range of nine to 11 years.

Wilson is set to be sentenced on Oct. 5.

Huff Post

An inquest date has been set after Crehan died five months into a year-long jail sentence

A prisoner who was serving time for putting bacon on the door handles of a Bristol mosque died after a drug overdose, it has been revealed.

Kevin ‘Bunny’ Crehan was five-months into his year-long sentence in Horfield Prison when he was discovered dead in his cell.

Emergency services were called to the prison on December 27, 2016 after he was found unresponsive.

Files from the police and a post-mortem report have now been completed after several pre-inquest reviews.

A full inquest will begin on Monday, December 3, and is expected to last more than two weeks.

That means it will be nearly two years before his family finds out how the 35-year-old from Knowle West came by his death.

A post mortem examination heard he had died of a suspected overdose of methadone, a common drug used as a strong painkiller and as a substitute for heroin.

The court was told he had been admitted to hospital while serving his term following a drug overdose.

After he recovered, he was sent back behind bars, but was found dead in his cell shortly after.

A police investigation has now been completed, and they are not treating it as suspicious at this time.

Why was he in prison?

Crehan had been jailed in July 2016 after pleading guilty to an attack on the Jamia mosque in Totterdown in January 2016.

The ‘protest’ saw bacon being placed on door handles, a St George flag tied to the fence and abuse shouted at two elderly people.

Together with three others, the far-right group were charged in court.

Crehan was jailed for a year while Mark Bennett, 48, from Patchway, was sentenced to nine months in prison.

His wife, Alison, 46, was given a six-month suspended sentence for her involvement and Angela Swales, 31, from Brislington, was given a four-month suspended jail term.

The judge who jailed Crehan said he had taken into account the 35-year-old’s history of convictions, including football-related violence.

The group has also been given restraining orders banning them from going within 100 metres of a mosque anywhere in England or Wales for 10 years.

In his summing up, Judge Julian Lambert called it “an attack on England and the principles of freedom of religion”.

Since Crehan died nearly 18 months ago, there has been mounting speculation about the circumstances surrounding his death.

And while police dismissed it as “not suspicious”, it has not stopped several groups of people coming to Bristol to protest his death and sentence.

The latest march took place in Bristol at the end of last month, with dozens joining the ‘Gays against Sharia’ march near Temple Meads.

The Prison and Probation Ombudsman has confirmed a report into Crehan’s death has been concluded and passed to the coroner, although that is not expected to be made public until after the inquest.

Sitting in front of Avon’s senior coroner Maria Voisin, the inquest will look into the circumstances surrounding Crehan’s death, including how and why he died.

Bristol Post

A DRINK and drug-driver tried to impress youngsters by speeding at up to 100mph on a residential street, before a “catastrophic crash” in which he left three passengers injured, one seriously, in the back seat.

Lewis Stores ignored requests from passengers to slow down moments before losing control of his Ford Focus, careering into pavement street furniture and ploughing into a bus shelter at 5am on April 2.

Just before the crash, Stores, who was jailed for 32 months yesterday, told his passengers “Watch this”.

Stores and his front seat passenger fled from the wreckage on Clyde Terrace, Spennymoor, but a passer-by freed two passengers from the car, but the third, a 14-year-old boy, suffered multiple fractures and other injuries and was airlifted to Newcastle’s Royal Victoria Infirmary.

Durham Crown Court was told as 20-year-old Stores was arrested at home almost double the drink-driving limit and with cocaine in his system two hours after the crash, the boy underwent emergency surgery for fractures to his left leg and arm, wrist and fingers.

Ian West, prosecuting, said while the boy came close to having to have an arm amputated due to a loss of blood flow, Stores, of Salisbury Crescent, West Cornforth, admitted to police he had been drinking at a house party in Middlestone Moor, Spennymoor.

The boy spent a month in hospital and the court heard, seven months on from the accident, he was still receiving treatment for nerve damage and skin grafts to his leg and arm, while he had lost dexterity in his wrist.

An impact statement from his mother, read to the court, said the boy still had some difficulty walking, as the recovering leg sometimes gave way, while he had only been able to attend school a few days a week.

Stores told police as he had a car, party-goers had asked him to drive to a petrol station for alcohol and drop some part-goers home.

Mr West said Stores began driving at excessive speed, “with an element of showing off” after leaving the petrol station.

A witness estimated the Focus to have reached up to 100mph on Clyde Terrace, while police experts concluded just before impact it was travelling at 72mph on the 30mph-limit street.

Stores admitted causing serious injury by dangerous driving, and drink and drug-driving.

Amrit Jandoo, mitigating, said Stores, of previous good character, had committed an “appalling piece of driving”.

Mr Jandoo said: “He had been at this house party, but it was at the request of others he was obliged to take others to petrol stations to buy more alcohol. But, by getting into the car he accepts he knew he was over the limit.

“Others getting into the car were impressed by this vehicle and in some ways he wanted to impress them with its speed and power, and that led to this moment of madness. When told to slow down he applied his brakes, but lost control.”

Mr Jandoo said after the impact, Stores panicked and fled, but by the time police called at his home there was “no prevarication”.

Judge Simon Hickey said more than just one passenger could have suffered catastrophic injuries as a result, and it was only down to the skill of the surgeons that the long-term consequences were not worse for the most badly affected passenger.

Stores was also banned from driving for four years and four months.

Northern Echo

Dominic Howe admitted having a Samurai sword in the street.

Dominic Howe admitted having a Samurai sword in the street.


A MENTALLY ill man, armed with a samurai sword, was on the way to avenge his uncle’s death when he was stopped by police in South Tyneside, a court heard.

Dominic Lewis Howe has been banned from South Tyneside for six months after being found with the 18-inch weapon while under the influence of drink and drugs.

The court heard a resident had raised the alarm after spotting the 20-year-old staggering along Sheridan Road, South Shields, at about 8am on Monday, with the handle of the sword sticking out of his trousers.

Howe was arrested and, after he’d sobered up, told police he had been on his way to find the man who had supplied his uncle with the drugs he used to kill himself with an overdose.

Yesterday, Howe, of Percy Road, Whitley Bay, appeared before South Tyneside Magistrates’ Court.

Jeanette Smith, prosecuting, said: “He told police he had been drinking. He had gone to watch Newcastle play and had been drinking.

“He had also taken cocaine and ended up in a friend’s house in Whiteleas.

“He continued drinking and began to think about his uncle, who died of a drugs overdose. He wanted to find the man who sold his uncle the drugs, and he went out with the intention of trying to kill that person.

“All that was on his mind was revenge.” The court was told that Howe has been diagnosed with a bipolar disorder and is hoping to receive medication in order to treat the illness.

Geoffrey Forrester, defending, said: “Looking at the reality of the situation, the defendant was extremely intoxicated and was staggering around with the sword down his trousers.

“In all probability he presented more of a threat to himself than to anyone else.

“There was no suggestion he was waving this sword around.

“This was something that was going to end with him being arrested by police before anything was going to happen. He wasn’t in any state to do anything.”

Magistrates warned Howe, who pleaded guilty to being in possession of an offensive weapon in a public place, that they were considering sending him to jail.

However, the court heard from the probation service that sending him to prison would be detrimental to his mental health condition.

Chairman of the Bench, Robert McDonald, said: “The bench has spent considerable time discussing how to deal with you for what is a very serious offence.

“Carrying that weapon in itself is dangerous. However, you did not produce it or threaten anyone, which is something we have taken into account.

“We were very close to sending you to prison.”

Howe was jailed for 12 weeks, suspended for 18 months, with 18 months supervision and banned from South Tyneside for six months.

Shields Gazette

Members of five organised crime groups behind a major drugs supply racket have been locked up for a total of 132 years in prison.

Tens of thousands of pounds worth of illegal drugs were found by police after exchanges made by group members.

Police today welcomed the sentences saying the group members had ‘played a significant role in fuelling drug crime’ in the Midlands.

In total, 23 group members, based in areas including Cannock, Stafford and Walsall, pleaded guilty in earlier hearings to conspiracy to supply either class A or class B drugs.

The majority of defendants were sentenced at Stafford Crown Court this week.

The court heard that cocaine and M-CAT, which is a class B synthetic stimulant drug, was being transported through the group’s links in the West Midlands, Swindon and Derbyshire.

Staffordshire Police’s Major and Organised Crime department led the operation to bring them to justice.

It investigated the organised crime group based in Cannock and led by John Appleton and Michael O’ Mahoney.

Appleton and O’Mahoney were each jailed for 14 years yesterday for leading the complex cocaine and mephedrone supply ring.

Detectives tracked the movements of Appleton and O’ Mahoney after their release from prison in 2013, after they formed a tight-knit Cannock group with Jason Bayley, Carol Pope, Derek Hodgkiss and Russell Degg.

Bayley and Pope were the trusted couriers of drugs and money, said Staffordshire Police, while Hodgkiss acted as Pope’s driver.

The force said Degg provided a safe-house for storage in Repton Close, Cannock, as the group initially supplied MCAT and cocaine to another group in Swindon, Wiltshire.

Detectives tracked the group’s activity, through phone analysis and vehicle movements along the M6 and M5.

Arrests were made on February 28, 2015, when a quantity of cocaine and two kilos of MCAT were supplied to Gary and Keith Peapell near to junction 11A of the M5 in Gloucestershire.

The rural area of Crickley Hill Country Park became a significant meeting place for members of the two crime groups, said investigating officers.

Adam Farmer, David Perkins and Lee Higgins were part of a group in Redditch which was supplied with multiple quantities of MCAT by the Cannock group.

On March 4, 2015, following an exchange with Higgins, Carol Pope was stopped in a car in Cannock and £35,000 was discovered in the foot-well.

Fingerprints were discovered on a cash bag which linked the Redditch and Swindon groups, Staffordshire Police said.

Jason Bayley was due to meet Lewis Chambers on March 16, 2015, in a deal brokered by Jamie Sleigh on behalf of the Cannock and West Midlands crime groups.

The meeting was due to be held at the Chase Gate pub, in Wolverhampton Road, Cannock, when he was intercepted and arrested by officers with 4kg of MCAT in a bag.

The force say the Cannock group also formed links with Shane Andrews and the Stafford group.

Darren Pearson, who later acted as a warehouseman for the Cannock group following earlier enforcement, then went on to supply Andrews with half a kilo of cocaine.

The crime group were proven to have well-established links with Gareth Pincombe, head of the Derbyshire crime group.

Appleton and O’Mahoney ran out of runners and dealers as detectives closed in on the group.

He asked his son, Bret Appleton, to collect MCAT, but Bret was arrested on his return from Swadlincote with 3kg of MCAT.

Inspector Pete Cooke, of Staffordshire Police’s Major and Organised Crime team, said: “These sentences reflect the commitment and hard work of officers. We’re delighted to see offenders who have preyed on the vulnerable in our communities behind bars for a considerable period of time.

“All of them played a significant role in fuelling drug crime in south Staffordshire and elsewhere across the Midlands and South West and their sentences are very much welcomed.

“Staffordshire Police is committed to tackling drug crime in our communities and our work will continue under Operation Nemesis.”

Full list of defendants and sentences

John Appleton, aged 46, of Locketts Court, Cannock, sentenced to 14 years
Michael O’ Mahoney, aged 43, of Avenue Road, Cannock, sentenced to 14 years
Gary Peapell, aged 38, of Swindon, sentenced to 8 years 8 months
Adam Farmer, aged 35, of Kineton Close, Redditch, sentenced to 8 years 6 months
Shane Andrews, aged 35, of John Donne Street, Stafford, sentenced to 8 years
Gareth Pincombe, aged 38, of Repton Road, Swadlincote, sentenced to 8 years 2 months
Jason Bayley, aged 45, of Leamington Close, Cannock, sentenced to 8 years
Carol Pope, aged 44, of Glover Street, Cannock, sentenced to 7 years 2 months
Darren Pearson, aged 46, of Moss Street, Cannock, sentenced to 7 years 2 months
Jamie Wilson, aged 38, of Sidney Avenue, Stafford, sentenced to 6 years 9 months
Keith Peapell, aged 62, Swindon, sentenced to 6 years
Russell Degg, aged 40, of Repton Close, Cannock, sentenced to 6 years
Scott Kenny, aged 32, of Mosedale, Rugby, sentenced to 5 years 4 months
Lewis Chambers, aged 26, of Hillary Street, Walsall, sentenced to 4 years
Lucy Butler, aged 35, of Sanderling Close, Featherstone, sentenced to 4 years
Richard Menzies, aged 33, of Meadow View Road, Swadlincote, sentenced to 3 years 7 months
Jamie Sleigh, aged 37, of St John’s Road, Cannock, sentenced to 3 years 7 months
David Perkins, aged 31, of Hindlip Close, Redditch, sentenced to 3 years 4 months
Bret Appleton, aged 25, of Locketts Court, Cannock, sentenced to 20 months
Derek Hodgkiss, aged 56, of St John’s Road, Cannock, received a 17 month suspended sentence
Lee Higgins, aged 32, of Fownhope Close, Redditch, received an 11-month suspended sentence.
Matthew Parsons, aged 34, of Lower Birches Way, Rugeley, was sentenced to a total of 3 years 6 months for class A and class B supply on December 13, 2016.
Kyle Wilson, 19, of Merrivale Road, Stafford, pleaded guilty to being concerned in the supply of class B drugs and was sentenced to 14 months’ detention in a youth offenders’ institution on April 7, 2017.
Express & Star

A man stopped as he drove a BMW on the motorway was found to have cocaine residue in his body.

Jordan Leak, a 22-year-old salesman, of Waring Drive, Thornton, pleaded guilty to drug driving.

He was disqualified from driving for 16 months and fined £120 with £85 costs plus £30 victims’ surcharge.

Prosecutor, Martine Connah, said police received a tip-off and stopped Leak on the M55 at Kirkham, on May 6 at 2.40am.

A blood test showed 100 micrograms of a cocaine residue in his body – 50 is the legal limit.

David Charnley, defending, said Leak would lose his job.

Blackpool Gazette