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POMPEY football thugs who terrorised Portsmouth city centre ahead of a Plymouth game were shown no mercy by a judge who threw eight hooligans behind bars for a total of nearly 10 years.

The gang of 16 defendants, who appeared at Portsmouth Crown Court throughout the week, were clinging to the hope they may be spared jail for their violent disorder before the League Two clash in April last year.

Stills from body-worn police cameras during violence before the Pompey-Plymouth game in 2017. 'Eight men have now been jailed.

Stills from body-worn police cameras during violence before the Pompey-Plymouth game in 2017. ‘Eight men have now been jailed.

But those hopes were crushed for half of them as one by one they were sent down.

Despite lengthy running battles against police in Guildhall Square and clashes with Plymouth fans, including where one was repeatedly booted like a football, things could have been far worse.

Sentencing the group, Judge Timothy Mousley said: ‘It is a matter of luck there were no serious injuries especially to the man on the floor getting kicked.’

Robbie Fowler, 22, of April Square, Landport, was handed the longest jail term out of the hooligans after he was given two years behind bars and a six year football banning order.

Judge Mousley told Fowler, who was serving a four year banning order at the time, he was the ‘most prominent among the group’ with him seen ‘limbering up’ to fight. Chief among his offences in amongst the constant violent disorder were him kicking out at a police dog and trying to get a policeman to fight him.

Matthew Allinson, 33, of Frogmore Lane, Waterlooville was given 18 months jail and a six year football banning order.

Richard Hampshire, 26, of Tudor Crescent, was given 14 months custody and a six year football banning order.

Ryan Keating, 19, of Oxenwood Green, Havant, was given 13 months in a young offenders institute and a six year football banning order.

Anthony Hopkins, 22, of Langley Road, Buckland, was given 12 months prison and a six year football banning order.

Tommy Russell, 20, of Appleshaw Green, Havant, received 12 months at a young offenders institute and a six year banning order.

Harley Hawkins, 19, of Whitecliffe Avenue, Copnor, was handed the same sentence.

Sean Mitchell, 46, of Chaucer Drive, Chichester, was handed 14 months prison and a six year football banning order.

Simon Hore, 33, of Medina Road, Cosham, was given 13 months prison suspended for 18 months, 250 hours unpaid work, compensation of £250 to Pompey and a four year football banning order.

Louis Glasspool received the same sentence but was given 10 months at a young offenders institute suspended for 18 months.

Harry Jarvie, 21, of Manor Road, Buckland also received the same but was given 12 months jail suspended for 18 months.

Connor Bowen, 19, of Lower Farlington Road, Farlington, was handed eight months in a detention centre suspended for 18 months, was given 250 hours unpaid work, 20 rehabilitation days, told to pay Pompey £250 and given a four year football banning order.

Tommy Houlden, 19, of Hayling Avenue, Copnor, was given the same as Bowen but was given 15 months at a detention centre suspended for 18 months and 15 rehabilitation days.

Asa Palmer, 23, of Sea View Road, Drayton, got nine months jail suspended for 18 months, 250 hours unpaid work, 20 rehabilitation days, told to pay compensation of £250 and a four year football banning order.

Jack Stobart, 23, of April Square, Landport, was given 12 months jail suspended for 18 months, 250 hours unpaid work, a four year football banning order and told to pay Pompey £250.

Shane Bartram, 26, of Goodwood Road, Southsea, got 12 months prison suspended for 18 months, as well as 250 hours unpaid work, told to pay £250 compensation and a four year banning order.
Portsmouth News

Appearing in court, this Newcastle fan claims he was forced to leap out of the away end at Huddersfield…

Newcastle fan Reece Smailes has been up in court after an incident that happened towards the end of the Huddersfield match earlier this month.

When Dwight Gayle walked the third Newcastle goal in, the United fan in question jumped over the barrier at the front and was then arrested in the area between pitch and away end.

The 24 year old pleading guilty to a charge under the Football Offences Act 1991 of going onto the playing area during a designated match.

In his defence/mitigation, he said that he’d had no choice but to leap over the barrier…because his recently done Newcastle United tattoo was sore from being pushed against by celebrating fans.

When searched by Police, they also found a bag of cocaine which he said was for personal use.

Magistrates were told that Smailes was previously given a three year Football Banning Order following an incident in 2011 when he punched a West Bromwich Albion fan.

The prosecution were asking for another banning order to be put in place.

Prosecutor Shamaila Qureshi:

“He was seen jumping over the safety barrier onto an area around the playing surface and raising his arms.

“As soon as he got to the area near the pitch he was arrested.”

“He admitted going into the banned area and said that this was to prevent being pushed against the safety barriers.

“The defendant said that he got pushed to the front and was concerned as he’d just had a large tattoo done.

“It was sore and hurt and he jumped over the barrier.”

Rachel Sharpe defending/in mitigation:

“The defendant was being shoved up against the barrier and then jumped over it to prevent discomfort having had a new tattoo.

“He ran towards the pitch but stopped himself before entering the pitch.

“This was in the last minute of the game when Newcastle scored and he was celebrating.

“He didn’t encroach into the pitch as he knows he shouldn’t and was quickly apprehended.”

The Magistrates did not make a Football Banning order but did order the Newcastle fan to pay a total of £484 plus £85 court costs and £32 victim surcharge.

The Mag

A Doncaster football fan banned from watching England for three years after he was filmed singing an anti-Semitic song and making Nazi salutes at the World Cup spent time listening to Nazi songs and calling for ‘right wing violence’ ahead of his trip to Russia.

Leeds United fan David Batty, 58, was handed the football ban after appearing in court in Leeds yesterday and was dubbed ‘disgraceful’ by a judge after being filmed shouting ‘sieg hiel’ and singing a song about Auschwitz with other England fans in a Russian bar.

David Batty will not be allowed to attend England football matches for three years. Credit: PA

David Batty will not be allowed to attend England football matches for three years. Credit: PA

Now it has emerged that Batty spent time listening to Nazi anthems, urged ‘right wing violence’ and described Germany as “mein fatherland” ahead of his trip to Volvograd for England’s 2-1 win over Tunisia. In a series of posts on Facebook with links to far right wing songs, Batty wrote: “So p***** off, gonna thrash the night with these tunes, could do with a bit of right wing violence – sieg.”

He then posted a series of clips to songs linked to the Nazis including Horst-Wessel-Lied, the anthem of the Nazi Party and which is banned in Germany and Lore Lore, a German Wehrmacht marching song, popular with soldiers. He also shared a YouTube link to the current German national anthem Deutschland Uber Alles with the comment ‘mein Fatherland’ as well as a song called Hitler by German industrial metal band Rammstein.

German actress and singer Marlene Dietrich, who defected to the US during World War Two and helped rescue Jews, was described as a “sl*g” while another post read: “F*** em. Sieg heil. White power and all that.” And in replying to a British National Party post about a student ‘storming’ into a university talk and disrupting a speech by Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg he wrote: “They can have their view point but no one else is allowed one, left wing commie tossers. Put them in the showers and wash them lol.”

Batty was one of two men handed banning orders after a video showing England fans singing an anti-Semitic song at the World Cup was shared online. The behaviour of Batty and fellow fan Michael Burns in a bar in the Russian city of Volgograd was described as “disgraceful” by district judge Charlotte Holland who added: “I have seen the activity that you were involved in and seen the still images from what you did. “You know that at this time people are getting behind the national team, including children, and your actions are ruining that.”

The city of Volgograd, which was the venue for England’s 2-1 win over Tunisia, was formerly known as Stalingrad – the site of one of the bloodiest battles in history when Soviet soldiers repelled Hitler’s army during the Second World War. The pair both accepted the banning notice, which was served under the 1989 Football Spectators Act, when they appeared at Leeds Magistrates’ Court and it means they will not be able to be within a two-mile radius of any England football matches until 2021.

The court heard how the pair both had tickets for upcoming matches at the tournament but the judge said their non-attendance of these fixtures was an “unfortunate consequence of their actions”. The fans were recorded singing to the tune of an old Tottenham Hotspur song called Ossie’s Dream, which had the lyrics, ‘We’re on our way to Wembley’, changing them to, ‘We’re on the way to Auschwitz’.

Batty must not go within two miles of the stadium in which any future games are being played for four hours before and after the game and must report to a police station on the day of the games and must also surrender travel documents.

Yorkshire Post

Michael Burns is one of two men had a three-year football ban. Credit: PA

Michael Burns is one of two men had a three-year football ban. Credit: PA

Two men have been handed three-year football banning orders after a video appeared to show England fans singing an anti-Semitic song at the World Cup.

The behaviour of David Batty and Michael Burns in a bar in the Russian city of Volgograd was described as “disgraceful” by a district judge.

The city of Volgograd, which was the venue for England’s 2-1 win over Tunisia, was formerly known as Stalingrad – the site of one of the bloodiest battles in history when Soviet soldiers repelled Hitler’s army during the Second World War.

Leeds Magistrates’ Court heard how the pair both had tickets for upcoming matches at the 2018 World Cup, but were ordered to return home.

The pair both accepted the banning notice, which was served under the 1989 Football Spectators Act, when they appeared in court on Tuesday.

David Batty will not be allowed to attend England football matches for three years. Credit: PA

David Batty will not be allowed to attend England football matches for three years. Credit: PA

Batty, 58, of Doncaster, and 52-year-old Burns, from Billingham in Cleveland, both looked emotionless as they were told that they would not be able to be within a two-mile radius of any England football matches until 2021.

She added: “I have seen the activity that you were involved in and seen the still images from what you did.

“You know that at this time people are getting behind the national team, including children, and your actions are ruining that.”

Malcolm Christy, prosecuting, told the court how the pair had been involved in “inappropriate singing” and that a three-year ban would be the most suitable punishment.

A third man, 57-year-old Michael Herbert, was handed a five-year banning order at Leicester Magistrates’ Court on Saturday, the NPCC said.

Last Wednesday, a spokesman for the FA said of the footage: “We strongly condemn the actions of the people in this video.

“The disgraceful conduct of the individuals in this video does not represent the values of the majority of English football fans supporting the team in Russia.”

Another man, Paul Johnson, 25, of Banbury, Oxfordshire, was given a three-year football banning order at Oxford Magistrates’ Court on Saturday following a separate incident on a train near Moscow on June 16, the NPCC said.

ITV News

Michael Herbert was banned for five years after an investigation into an anti-Semitic video, filmed in Russia.

Police have been investigating an anti-Semitic video which circulated online

Police have been investigating an anti-Semitic video which circulated online

Two men have been banned from attending football matches following offences at the Russia World Cup.

Michael Herbert, 57, from Derby, was given a five-year football banning order when he appeared at Leicester Magistrates Court.

It follows an investigation by police into an anti-Semitic video which circulated online.

Another two men, aged 52 and 58, were served with notices under the Football Spectators Act.

Although they appeared in Leicester Magistrates Court, their case was adjourned until 26 June.

Following a separate incident on a train near Moscow on 17 June, Paul Johnson, 25, was given a three-year football banning order.

Police were hunting those who appeared in a video performing a Nazi salute.

The FA condemned the behaviour, adding: “We are working with the relevant authorities, including the UK police investigations team, who are making inquiries to identify the individuals involved and take appropriate action.

“The disgraceful conduct of the individuals in this video does not represent the values of the majority of English football fans supporting the team in Russia.”
Sky News

He was banned after having a flare at a match in Cheshire

A banned football fan has admitted failing to hand over his passport to ensure he did not attend England’s away matches.

Carpentry apprentice Benjamin Baguley was given a one-year conditional discharge by Nottingham magistrates, who ordered him to pay £85 prosecution costs and £30 government tax.

They were told that he was handed a three-year football banning order by magistrates in Cheshire last year. Baguley, 22, of Montague Street, Bulwell, was also fined.

Sarah Smith, prosecuting, told the Nottingham court: “He was found guilty of possessing a flare and throwing it onto the pitch during a match.

“When the order was imposed, one condition was to surrender his passport when England are playing away.”

This was pointed out in a letter sent to him on August 29 last year but he had failed to hand in the passport by October 4.

Miss Smith added: “When interviewed about the matter, he accepted that he knew the condition. He said that he was busy at work, that was the reason why he didn’t comply and acknowledged the breach would be a serious matter.”

Baguley admitted failing to surrender his passport at the Central Police Station on October 4. He was given a one-year conditional discharge.

He told the court: “I know I have done wrong. I was busy and was more focused on sorting myself out, trying to get an apprenticeship which I managed to get.”

Presiding magistrate Maureen Baker, who sat with two colleagues, told him: “The football banning order is very important and was for a serious offence.

“It was very important you comply with the order and part of your order was to surrender your passport.

“We are giving you another chance. Keep out of trouble and comply with the football banning order.”

There is no suggestion that Baguley used the passport to watch football matches.

Nottingham Post

A new father from Whitchurch punched his partner while she was in a hospital delivery room giving birth to their child, a court heard.

The following day she was kicked and punched by 24-year-old Myles Davies outside her home which left her with a broken wrist.

The victim also suffered bruising to her legs and body in the assault less than 24 hours after giving birth. That morning, Davies had complained the victim rocking the child’s cradle kept him awake.

The police and social services had already been alerted when the victim was punched on the shoulder at Telford’s Princess Royal Hospital in the delivery suite.

At Shrewsbury Crown Court yesterday Judge Peter Barrie said Davies had been involved in ‘aggressive and nasty’ behaviour.

“Anyone who hears about this behaviour towards your partner and mother of your child would realise you are in serious need of help,” he said.

He told Davies that he was a high risk to the public and to partners, present and future and to children.

Judge Barrie said it was to the victim’s credit that she said in her statements that, despite being upset, she acknowledged that Davies had mental health issues and had not been getting the support he needed.

Davies was given a two-year community order which involves intense relationship and rehabilitation programmes.

The court heard Davies had been on remand for over six months which was equal to getting a 15-month prison sentence.

Judge Barrie said it was in the public interest to change the defendant’s attitude and prison was not the harsh punishment for him that it was for others.

An indefinite restraining order was also imposed on Davies for him to have no contact with the victim and any access to his young child was to be through the official channels.

Davies, of Alkington Road, Whitchurch, who appeared in court via a video link from prison, had pleaded guilty to charges of common assault and assault causing actual bodily harm on November 14 and 15 last year.

The court heard Davies had previously been jailed for assault when he was a member of the English Defence League, threatening behaviour at an EDL demonstration and a football banning order for being on Shrewsbury Town’s pitch while in possession of a firework.

Mr Kevin Jones, prosecuting, said that Davies was involved in ‘controlling’ behaviour with the victim at her home and had behaved strangely at the hospital delivery room causing staff to alert social services and police.

He said that Davies had struck her on the shoulder three or four times while she was in labour.

The next day Davies had issues with the victim nursing the baby, having a light on and having to feed the child and complained her rocking the child’s cradle kept him awake.

Mr Jones said Davies left at 2am but returned a few hours later and was unhappy that the victim had the baby on the bed with her and had complained that doors in the house were left open.

When Davies was later leaving he had pushed her back into the flat but as she tried to get to a relative’s car outside she fell and was kicked and punched on the body and legs by the defendant.

Mr Stephen Scully, for Davies, said that psychological reports indicated his client had poor self esteem, unpredictable emotions and insecurity and lost his temper when under stress and when he felt threatened.

He said Davies thrived in the secure and structured prison regime and was working to dealing with his mental health issues and the reasons for his offending.

Shropshire Star