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COVENTRY killer Andrew Luke Henson was today starting an eight- year jail sentence for the drugs-related shooting of a man in a city pub.

A jury at Birmingham Crown Court unanimously cleared self-confessed drugs dealer Henson of murder but found him guilty of manslaughter on the basis of provocation because he was being assaulted with knives and bottles at the time.

Lee Michael Moore and Paul Trevor Case, who were jointly charged along with Henson of murder, were acquitted.

The jury took a little less than three hours to agree on their verdict and reject the claim that the three had plotted to kill Richard Waring, of Potters Green, Coventry.

Father-of-two Mr Waring was shot in the back with a sawn-off shotgun in the Crow in the Oak pub in Lockhurst Lane, Foleshill, on January 29 last year.

Jailing Henson, Judge Michael Astill said: “The evidence clearly shows you were subjected to a violent and vicious attack by others. It was a concerted attack when you were defenceless and alone. You reacted by losing your self control.”

Henson, aged 26, of Kingfield Road, Foleshill, was being beaten by a group of men in the pub when Mr Moore and Mr Case arrived to meet him.

Mr Moore was carrying a sawn-off shotgun retrieved from under the floorboards of his home in Guild Road, Foleshill. He claimed he brought it at the request of Henson who was going to pass it on to a criminal contact.

Mr Case took the gun and held it in the air to try to stop the attack on his friend. Henson tossed aside a bar stool he was using to fend off bottles and blows, grabbed the gun and shot Mr Waring, who was leaving the pub.

Although Mr Waring’s friends were attacking Henson, the court heard he was not involved.

Afterwards all three went on the run, claiming they feared reprisal attacks, but were arrested a few days later.

The judge recorded not guilty verdicts against Mr Moore, aged 26, and Mr Case, aged 32, of Cheylesmore, in relation to a further offence of possessing a firearm with intent to endanger life. The same charge against Henson was allowed to lie on the file.

After the hearing Det Supt Barrie Simpson, who led the investigation, said: “It is another case where drugs and firearms have cost a life. We must continue the effort to combat drugs and firearms in the West Midlands.”

Free Library

From 2000

Thanks to Lee Garrett for the tip off.

Far-right figure refused police access to his phone at Heathrow on return from Moscow

The leader of the far-right political group Britain First has been found guilty of an offence under the Terrorism Act after refusing to give police access to his mobile phone on his return from a political trip to Russia.

Paul Golding, 38, was stopped at Heathrow by Metropolitan police officers on 23 October last year on his way back from Moscow. He refused to give the pin codes for an iPhone and Apple computer and was later charged with wilfully refusing to comply with a duty under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act.

Golding denied the charge but was found guilty following a trial at Westminster magistrates court in London on Wednesday.
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Chief magistrate Emma Arbuthnot ruled there was “no doubt” that Golding had failed to comply with requests for information, despite his obligations being explained to him and being warned “over and over” that he risked arrest.

She handed Golding a conditional discharge for nine months and ordered him to pay a £21 surcharge and £750 in costs.

Arbuthnot said Golding had been lawfully questioned and that under Schedule 7 there had been no requirement for “reasonable suspicion” for the stop.

Giving evidence earlier, PC Rory O’Connor, a borders officer with the Met who questioned Golding, told the court that Schedule 7 enables accredited officers to “speak to people in order to make a determination of whether they are or have been concerned in the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism”.

The officer explained that it also permitted police to interrogate, search and detain anyone for up to six hours at UK ports.

He said he had cause to examine Golding under the legislation and recalled him being initially “agitated” and “clearly angry” at being stopped, with him shouting at officers.

Golding, of Hodder Bank, Stockport, spoke only to confirm his name, date of birth, address and nationality.

English Defence League founder Tommy Robinson, whose real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, watched the proceedings in the court’s physically distanced public gallery.

Golding described Britain First as a “patriotic, right-wing, conservative” group who considered themselves “loyalist”.

Representing Golding, Abigail Bright said Britain First had never been a banned organisation. She said Golding had been “calm, compliant and respectful” during questioning under what she claimed was a “predetermined operation”.

Britain First was deregistered as a political party in November 2017.

The Guardian

A classmate told teachers George Fowle could become ‘a school shooter’

A “racist” caught with explosive-making instructions after saying he wanted to bomb Camp America has been spared jail by a judge who told him: “Change your ways.”

George Fowle, who studied public services at North Kent College, was arrested at Heathrow Airport on June 18 last year on his way to the summer camp in the US.

The 20-year-old had been referred to the national anti-terror Prevent programme in March 2019 after a class member raised fears with teachers he could become a “school shooter”, the Old Bailey heard.

Fowle, from Snodland, appeared in court on Monday, where he pleaded guilty to two counts of collecting a record of use to a terrorist in January and February 2018.

The documents, entitled “Plastiqe.txt” and “How to make Nitroglycerin”, were said to contain “essentially correct and viable” instructions for making explosives.

Prosecutor Dan Pawson-Pounds said other material seized in the investigation showed Fowle had an “entrenched extreme right wing and racist mindset, as well as an interest in explosives, firearms and mass casualty incidents in public places such as schools”.

This included a video of the Christchurch mosque mass shootings, which left 51 people dead during Friday prayers on March 15 last year.

Investigators also found a Snapchat comment sent by Fowle on June 10 last year, which said: “I want to petrol bomb Camp America.”

But the court heard there was no evidence of any risk to Camp America with nothing to suggest Fowle had tried to use the explosive-making instructions or had any links with terrorist groups.

His barrister Gavin Holme said Fowle needed help to increase his maturity and that his guilty pleas showed his “remorse and responsibility”.

“This is a young man who the authorities can work with, and not against,” he said.

Sentencing Fowle, Judge Mark Dennis QC said: “This was shameful and very disturbing criminal behaviour.

“You have purported to embrace a vile mindset, which should have no place in a tolerant, democratic and peaceful society.”

The judge said a sentence of 20 months in a young offenders’ institution, suspended for two years, along with a 60-hour rehabilitation programme and 120 hours of unpaid work, would reduce the risk of Fowle re-engaging with the extreme right ideology.

He added: “I hope you listened to my words. You are being given a chance today. It’s not ‘mend your ways’, it’s ‘change your ways’.

“Wake up to how dreadful your views were and how dreadful your conduct was. You are part of a civilised society.”

Kent Live

Neo-Nazi Martyn Gilleard has been found guilty of making bombs for a far-right terrorist campaign, after having previously admitted downloading thousands of images of child sexual abuse.

Police initially searched Gilleard’s flat in Goole, East Yorkshire, in connection with child pornography offences.

But once inside the 31-year-old’s home, they discovered not just evidence of a paedophile, but the equipment of a potential terrorist as well.

Officers found machetes, swords, bullets, gunpowder and racist literature. Most sinister of all were four home-made nail bombs stashed under his bed.

He wrote of starting a “racial war” and murdering Muslims, but Martyn Gilleard boasted that he was no “barstool nationalist”.

‘Distressing images’

And a jury has decided he truly did want to put his white supremacist views into action.

At the opening of his trial at Leeds Crown Court, Gilleard admitted 10 counts of child pornography offences. Officers had discovered more than 39,000 indecent images of children on his computer.

After sentencing, Ch Insp Chris Kelk, of Humberside Police, said: “The images include some of the most disturbing my team and I have ever seen and by admitting his crimes it has prevented the images being seen by jury members.”

Ch Insp Kelk commended his team for their professionalism despite the “distressing nature” of the images.

Jurors considering the terror charges did not learn of this until they delivered their verdict.

‘Potentially lethal’

Gilleard, a forklift truck driver from Goole, East Yorkshire, admitted to police and the court that he had held racist views.

At the time of his arrest he was a paid-up member of the National Front, the White Nationalist Party and the British People’s Party – all opposed to multiculturalism.

His computer password was Martyn1488 – the 14, according to prosecutor Andrew Edis QC, being a reference to the far-right’s “14 words” slogan, “We must secure the existence of our race and the future for white children.”

The 88, Mr Edis added, represented the eighth letter of the alphabet – an abbreviation for “Heil Hitler”.

But Gilleard was not simply a passive crank, the court was told.

In a notebook recovered by police, Gilleard wrote that the “time has come to stop the talk and start to act”.

“Unless we the British right stop talking of racial war and take steps to make it happen, we will never get back that which has been stolen from us,” he added.

“I am so sick and tired of hearing nationalists talk of killing Muslims, of blowing up mosques, of fighting back, only to see these acts of resistance fail to appear.”

In another note, he wrote that he wanted to see “reds” – left-wing activists – attacked with “lightning strikes” and “home-made grenades”.

His comments were a chilling echo of far-right nail bomber David Copeland, jailed for life for murder after attacks targeting London’s gay community and ethnic minorities in 1999.

By the time police raided his flat, Mr Edis said, Gilleard’s preparations for this impending conflict had already been well under way.

Officers had discovered the four nail bombs under a bed along with “potentially lethal bladed weapons”, 34 bullets for a .22 calibre firearm, and printouts from the internet about committing acts of terrorism, Mr Edis told the court.

These had included instructions on how to make a bomb and how to poison someone, he added.

Gilleard had already pleaded guilty at an earlier hearing to possessing 34 cartridges of ammunition without holding a firearms certificate.

Offensive weapon

But he denied that he had intended to hurt anyone with the nail bombs, arguing in court that he had only assembled them to give himself something to do.

When asked why he made the devices, he said: “I’d had a couple of cans. I was just sat around bored.”

The jury, however, decided that he had more sinister purposes in mind.

After the raid on Wednesday 31 October 2007, Gilleard fled to the home of his half-brother in Dundee, Tayside. Police caught up with him after a three-day manhunt.

Detectives who interviewed his work colleagues were told that he had expressed racist views to them. The police also recovered a high-visibility jacket belonging to Gilleard that had been daubed with a hand-drawn swastika.

Born on 15 July 1976 in York, Martyn Paul Gilleard had a complicated upbringing. At the time of his birth his mother had two older children by her ex-husband. He became the adopted son of his mother’s new partner after she remarried in 1978.

He left school at 16 with GCSEs in history, English language and literature, but failed to complete a course at Northallerton College. In 2000 he began working for Howarth Timber in Breighton, East Yorkshire, as a forklift truck driver.

In 2002 – the same year he was fined £25 for possession of an offensive weapon – his partner gave birth to a son, but the couple split in 2006.

A prison cell, not the racial conflict of which he dreamed, now awaits him.

BBC News

From 2008

Nick Griffin and the BNP have been particularly vocal this past year when it comes to the subject of paedophiles.

Griffin has embraced every opportunity open to him to lead protests against the various Asian grooming gangs that have gone on trial across the country.

Yet he has been particularly quiet when it comes paedophiles who are white and in particular those white paedophiles who also happen to be members of the BNP.

Not a word was mentioned when it was revealed that Rhyl BNP organiser Ian Si’ree was convicted last month for making and possessing 138 illegal images of child sex abuse.

The BNP also failed to comment when Lancashire BNP member Nigel Hesmondhalgh was imprisoned for nine months after a series of degrading photos and videos of children were found on his home computer in 2011.

In 2010 the BNP said nothing when Northampton BNP activist Darren Francis was jailed for a sexual relationship with a 13 year old girl.Francis was described by police as “every parents’ worst nightmare”

Another BNP paedophile who was jailed recently was Charnwood activist Gavin Leist. Leist who stood for the BNP in the county council elections was a member of a child porn network where he possessed and distributed child pornography of boys under the age of 13.

The court heard that he had joined an online paedophile network and had exchanged emails and incited people to send pictures to him. He also sent emails to three different users with pictures.

Leist was given a 16 month prison sentence and was also handed a Sexual Offences’ Prevention Order, which means his future computer use can be monitored at any time.

He was released from prison on June 19th and you would have thought that the local BNP members would have shunned Leist ?

Apparently this isn’t the case as Coventry BNP organiser Mark Badrick soon contacted Leist on Facebook and started chatting with him as if he had been reunited with a long lost friend.

Badrick and the BNP can obvously turn a blind eye to its collection of BNP paedophiles.

Hope not Hate

From 2012

A SERIOUS violent sex offender who was last year returned to prison for a third time for failing a drug test while on conditional release has this morning been released back into the community.

Brisbane Supreme Court Justice Ann Lyons this morning ordered Darren Anthony Francis be released under a restrictive supervision order.

Lawyers for Francis, 36, last week made its latest attempt to secure him freedom after failing to meet conditions of a previous order.

Barrister Brad Farr, SC, for Queensland’s Attorney-General, on Friday argued Francis should continue to be held in custody, but if released be placed under a strict supervision order.

Defence counsel Carl Heaton, for Francis, said his client should be released and that employment would play a significant role in preventing Francis from re-offending.

Francis, then aged 27, was jailed in 1999 for multiple sex offences and degrading physical abuse of his then partner.

He was one of the first prisoners to be held in jail past his 2004 full-time release date under new Queensland laws designed to stop sex criminals from reoffending.

He was released in 2006, but was returned to custody for breaching his supervision order by using drugs and forming an intimate relationship with a woman.

In April last year, the Supreme Court granted Francis conditional release after finding he posed a “low risk” of reoffending.

Justice Philip McMurdo, who granted Francis conditional, supervised release, found that for Francis to be a true risk to the community, he needed to be demonstrating substance misuse while in an intimate relationship.

Justice McMurdo found there was no evidence of those circumstances.

At the time of his release, Francis was also the subject of a six-month, wholly suspended prison term after being convicted by District Court Judge Michael Noud in December 2007 of escaping lawful custody.

Francis last fronted court in July for destroying his monitoring device in the watch-house — fearing other prisoners may harm him, a court has been told.

The Brisbane District Court was told Francis ripped his electronic monitoring device from around his ankle when police placed him in the cell of a Brisbane watchhouswith other inmates after he returned a positive test for cannabis, breaching his supervision order, in March last year.

Judge Michael Shanahan was told the tainted urine sample was a breach of the conditions of Francis’s Supreme Court-approved Dangerous Prisoner (Sexual Offenders) Act supervision order.

Francis removed the device fearing other cell mates may have thought he had been taken into custody for more serious offences, the court was told.

It was implied, although not stated explicitly, that if the other inmates wrongly suspected Francis had committed further sex offences his safety may have been in jeopardy.

Francis was taken from his home, near Brisbane’s western corridor jail precinct, to the Richlands Magistrate’s Court watch-house.

Mr Heaton said Francis had unsuccessfully requested police remove the device before placing him a cell with other detainees.

Judge Shanahan sentenced Francis an additional one month in jail for the breach of the suspended sentence.

Justice Lyons made the formal orders to release Francis at 9.45am today, but her written findings and the conditions of the order are yet to released publicly.

It is expected her findings will be published on-line some time today.

From 2009

A POLICE search at the home of a murder suspect uncovered child abuse images on the computers of the accused’s dad.

Officers searched the home of suspect James Siree during the investigation into the murder of takeaway delivery driver Gabor Sarkozi at Meliden.

Two laptop computers and a hard drive used by his father were seized and police found images of child sex abuse.

Yesterday Ian Siree, 56, of Vale Road in Rhyl, escaped custody after admitting making and possessing 138 illegal images.

Police also found other images while not illegal in themselves displayed a sexual interest in young girls, Mold Crown Court was told.

Judge Niclas Parry said that what the defendant needed to understand was that what he chose to view was actually happening to children, as young as eight.

“They were subjected to what was displayed on these images,” he said.

“In addition there is some evidence to confirm an unhealthy interest in female children.”

He said the total found were not large, there were only two at the more serious level four and none of the highest level five.

There was no distribution and he had no convictions for anything similar.

He said any custodial sentence would be extremely short and he would be released back into the community within months without any of the underlying causes behind his offending being addressed.

“You have a very young child yourself and this needs to be addressed,” he added.

Siree was placed on supervision for three years on condition that he follows a sex offender treatment programme run by the probation service.

Siree was placed on the sex offender register and a SOPO (Sexual Offences Prevention Order) was also made which prohibits him having any anti-forensic software on his computer.

His computers must retain the history of their use and he must allow police access to his computers on request.

Paulinus Barnes, prosecuting, said that police searched the defendant’s address as part of the other investigation and found images on a laptop. Further images were found on a second lap top and a separate hard drive.

Siree admitted 10 charges of making and possessing the images at an earlier hearing.

James Siree, 22, and his uncle Gary Bland, 42, of Bryn Avenue, Rhyl were jailed for life in May for the murder of Mr Sarkozi.

Wales Online

From 2012