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Gang attacked man at house in Lincoln Boulevard with weapons and broken bottle

Jonathan West, who has a history of violence, was jailed for attacking a man at this house in Grimsby (Image: Grimsby Telegraph)

Jonathan West, who has a history of violence, was jailed for attacking a man at this house in Grimsby (Image: Grimsby Telegraph)

Three menacing vigilantes hurled bricks, nails and fencing at a man outside his home and one of them viciously attacked him with a baseball bat.

He also hurled a broken bottle at him after trying to slash him with it, a court heard.

The three troublemakers spray-painted “nonce” across a window at his boarded-up home after midnight before confronting him.

Jonathan West, 26, of Redbourne Road, Grimsby, admitted assault, causing actual bodily harm, on November 10 and affray.

Jeremy Evans, prosecuting, told Grimsby Crown Court that West and two other males went to a man’s home and spray-painted the word “nonce” across a bay window and directly underneath on chipboard.

The premises in Lincoln Boulevard, Grimsby, were boarded up after previous attacks.

The occupier was watching TV in the rear kitchen area after midnight when he heard a noise and got dressed.

He went outside and seized West, who had a spray can and a baseball bat, and asked him: “What are you doing?”

West swung the bat towards the man, who put up his arm to block the blows but suffered bruises.

“Police received several calls from members of the public aware of a disturbance going on,” said Mr Evans.

The intruders — one of them wearing a motorcycle helmet — pulled nails from fence panels and threw whatever they had at the occupier.

He was able to prise the baseball bat away from West, who picked up an already broken bottle and tried to slash out with it.

He threw it and it hit the man, causing a skin wound. Masonry and bits of fence were thrown by all three.

The occupier retreated back into his home and objects continued to be thrown.

One of the males, not West, made threats to stab the man and took exception to the baseball bat being taken.

There was a confrontation before the troublemakers retreated but West was arrested later in the morning.

He had convictions for 59 previous offences dating back to 2002, including wounding, affray, burglary and breaching an antisocial behaviour order.

Dale Brook, mitigating, said West had been in custody since November 11 and had no intention of approaching or contacting the victim.

He was keen to receive help to stay out of trouble.

There was a history between West and the man involved.

West was jailed for 10 months but, because of his time in custody, was expected to be released shortly.

He was given a five-year restraining order.
Grimsby Telegraph

Serial criminals Steven Danvers, aged 30, and 28-year-old Benjamin Rogers jailed for four and a half years

Two thugs have been jailed for robbing a city shop with a machete.

Serial offenders Steven Danvers, aged 30, and 28-year-old Benjamin Rogers raided the convenience store to grab £280.

But Rogers at least had little chance of getting away with it as he was a regular customer, Plymouth Crown Court heard.

Jailing both men for four and a half years, Judge Peter Johnson told the pair: “Both of you have very poor records. You hatched a plan that a robbery would take place at this convenience store.

“You Rogers carried out reconnaissance and Danvers you used a knife, a very threatening machete and you got away with a reasonable sum of money.”

He ruled that Danvers and Rogers were dangerous, meaning they will not be released at the usual half-way point of their sentence.

They will only be set free after serving two-thirds of the term, at three years, and then only if the parole board deems they no longer pose a public danger.

Both will have two-year extended licence periods upon their release.

Danvers and Rogers, both of no fixed address, pleaded guilty to robbery at the West Hoe Convenience Store on January 4.

Danvers also admitted having a bladed article.

The court heard that the two men entered the store just after 8pm with Danvers carrying the machete.

They threatened the male cashier with the weapon before escaping with the cash.

Ali Rafati, for Danvers, said his client was vulnerable.

He added the defendant had mental health difficulties and ended up sleeping rough in all weathers.

Mr Rafati said: “The robbery lasted about 30 seconds. No harm was caused to anyone. If any resistance had been offered he would have turned on his heels.

“He wanted money so he could drink and carry on living on the streets.”

Steven Danvers (left) and Benjamin Rogers, also known as Clancy

Steven Danvers (left) and Benjamin Rogers, also known as Clancy

Michael Green, for Rogers, also known as Clancy, said: “It is hardly the most sophisticated robbery. He was a regular there and they would know him and recognise him.”

Mr Green said that his client also had trouble with mental health problems and finding a settled address.

He added: “He is 28 years old and since 2010 until August last year he was in prison or at a psychiatric hospital. That is the sad reality.”

Plymouth Herald

HALIFAX — She sat motionless in the wood-panelled, windowless courtroom as the judge delivered the sentence: Life in prison with no chance of parole for a decade.

Lindsay Souvannarath was then led away by sheriffs, returned to the jail cells that have been her home since 2015.

It’s been three years since the Chicago-area woman was arrested at the Halifax airport with a “death suit” and books on serial killers in her luggage.

She was planning a Valentine’s Day shooting rampage, a plot concocted online with a Halifax teen that would have seen them open fire at the Halifax Shopping Centre food court on a busy Saturday in February 2015.

The 26-year-old American pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit murder only after thousands of damning Facebook messages between the conspirators were deemed admissible as evidence in the case.

Nova Scotia Supreme Court Justice Peter Rosinski told the court Friday that Souvannarath continues to pose a threat to public safety.

The judge said she has not expressed remorse for her murderous plot, nor has she renounced her ideological motivations for the conspiracy.

In his decision, he called her prospects for rehabilitation “very questionable” and said she needs to be separated from society until safety concerns can be addressed.

Rosinski said he is satisfied that had the plot not been interrupted by an anonymous tip and the quick actions of local police, the plan would have been carried out.

“Coming upon unsuspecting members of the public at the mall that day, what carnage would they have inflicted with a 16-gauge shotgun with 23 shells; a .308 calibre lever-action rifle with 13 shells; and a knife to finish off the wounded?”

The judge added: “Ms. Souvannarath’s intention was to kill more than the 13 people who suffered that fate at the Columbine High School shooting,” he wrote, referring to her obsession with the massacre in Littleton, Colo.

Her co-conspirator, 19-year-old James Gamble, killed himself as police surrounded his Halifax-area home.

Kate Battan, the lead investigator of the 1999 shooting who wrote a report highlighting parallels between the school shooting and the mall plot, called it “ironic” that Friday’s sentencing took place on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shooting.

She spent a month combing through the private online messages between Souvannarath and Gamble and their plans to mount an attack at a Halifax mall.

“My impression is that they were all in and this was not a joke,” she said in an interview. “At some point this became real, this was going to happen.”

The judge shared that view, telling the court that the “plan had been set in motion” once Souvannarath boarded a plane for Halifax.

The spectre of shooters opening fire in a busy mall threatened thousands of shoppers and workers and unsettled the city for months.

Rosinski cited the explicit intention to create mass panic and undermine the community’s sense of security as an aggravating factor in the sentencing.

“They intended to maximize dead and wounded casualties,” the judge wrote in his 32-page decision.

“That they intended to be mocking, callous and brutal in their treatment of potential victims they encountered is an aggravating factor.”

He said his sentencing was in part shaped by the principles that apply to terrorism offences and is intended to “send a clear message” to those conspiring to kill multiple people.

“Those who choose to pursue such deadly plans will pay a very heavy price,” Rosinski wrote.

Crown attorney Mark Heerema said the sentence serves as a deterrent for similar crimes.

“The court was unequivocal that this kind of conduct here in Canada by an offender who is not claiming to be remorseful or renouncing will never be accepted,” he told reporters outside the courtroom.

The woman from Geneva, a quiet suburb of Chicago, has been ordered to provide a sample of her DNA and will be subjected to a firearms prohibition for 10 years after her release from prison. He gave her credit for three years served in custody, so she will be eligible for parole in seven years.

Although the judge has recommended intensive psychological and psychiatric counselling and treatment, the sentence of life in prison means the 26-year-old could spend the rest of her days behind bars.

A third accomplice — a local man described in court as the “cheerleader” of the plot — was previously sentenced to a decade in jail.

At the sentencing hearing earlier in the week, Rosinski asked Souvannarath if she would like to address the court. She said: “I decline.”

Before delivering his decision Friday, the judge entered letters from Souvannarath’s parents and grandparents as exhibits in the case.

The parents of both Souvannarath and Gamble were in court for the sentencing hearing, but declined to be interviewed.

Souvannarath has been held at the Central Nova Scotia Correctional facility in a Halifax-area industrial park since her arrest. Her lawyer has said she will likely be transferred to a women’s institution in southern Ontario after sentencing.

The judge noted that the college graduate has been called a quiet prisoner who keeps to herself, participates in Books behind Bars, and was enrolled in a humanities course offered by Dalhousie University.

CTV News

A man who seriously injured a woman and her cousin by throwing acid into their car has been jailed for 16 years.

Resham Khan and Jameel Muhktar had been out celebrating Ms Khan’s 21st birthday on 21 June when they were attacked in Beckton, east London.

John Tomlin, 25, of Colman Road, Canning Town, admitted intentionally causing the pair grievous bodily harm.

Ms Khan told Snaresbrook Crown Court her birthday “turned into a day where my face was taken away from me”.

“I have been looking at myself in the mirror it upsets me, it brings back the incident on the day, it doesn’t look like me,” she added in her victim impact statement.

Sentencing Tomlin, Judge Sheelagh Canavan said the injuries were “dreadful and life changing”.

She added: “It is becoming all too common an occurrence on our streets that members of the public are pouring water over people who have had acid thrown over them, as if this is some sort of fashionable assault that is being carried out.”

John Tomlin doused Resham Khan and her cousin Jameel Muhktar with acid through a car window

John Tomlin doused Resham Khan and her cousin Jameel Muhktar with acid through a car window

Ms Khan, a Manchester Metropolitan University student, suffered face and neck injuries and was left with damage to her left eye.

She will carry lifelong scars and has suffered from severe depression and anxiety as a result of the attack, the court heard.

Mr Mukhtar, 37, who had to be placed in an induced coma, has permanent scarring to his head, neck and body and has lost hearing in one of his ears.

In his victim statement he told the court he suffers from depression and has tried to take his own life.

“I get flashbacks and am really worried to leave my house, constantly looking over my right shoulder fearing attacks,” he added.

“I am mentally and physically scarred for life. I can’t even have a relationship. It’s enough dealing with myself.”

Tomlin hurled acid through both front windows of the Renault Clio as it pulled up on Tollgate Road.

He was seen on CCTV chasing after the car and emptying the bottle of acid over Mr Muhktar as he sped away.

Witnesses described seeing the victims “jumping around as if they were on fire” in the road as their clothing “literally melted off them on to the ground”.

Tomlin was arrested after handing himself in to the police a month after the attack and said in a police interview that he was “hearing voices in my head”.

The victims had “no previous dealings” with their attacker and Judge Canavan previously described the assault as “somewhat random”.

Speaking outside court, Mr Muhktar branded Tomlin an “animal” and a “coward” and said he “deserves the death penalty”.

“The sentence isn’t long enough, my life has finished, I’m in continuous pain, I can’t sleep and I can’t eat,” he added.

“He should have been given life, he should have done the whole of his life in prison.”

Ms Khan added: “I hope to push through and get on as if it never happened.”

Helen Taylor, from the Crown Prosectution Service, said it was an “appalling attack that left the victims with physical and psychological scars”.

“This case serves as a warning of the harm acid can cause and that those who use it as a weapon can face significant prison sentences,” she added.

BBC News

Lindsay Souvannarath pleaded guilty last year to conspiracy to commit murder in a plan that involved opening fire at a mall in Halifax

Lindsay Souvannarath arrives at court in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, on 6 March 2015. Photograph: Darren Pittman/Reuters

Lindsay Souvannarath arrives at court in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, on 6 March 2015. Photograph: Darren Pittman/Reuters

An American woman who plotted to go on a Valentine’s Day shooting rampage at a Canadian mall was sentenced to life in prison on Friday with no chance of parole for nearly a decade.

Lindsay Souvannarath of Geneva, Illinois, pleaded guilty last year to conspiracy to commit murder in a plan that involved opening fire at a mall in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 2015.

Justice Peter Rosinski, of the Nova Scotia supreme court, said that Souvannarath is and will remain a threat to society. He said she has not expressed remorse for her plot.

Rosinski also said that if the plan to kill unsuspecting shoppers had not been interrupted by an anonymous tip and the quick actions of local police, it would have been carried out.

Rosinski said his sentence was partly shaped by the principles that apply to terrorism. While he told the court the motivations and intentions in the case are not precisely the same as those related to terrorism activities, he said the crime requires the court to “send a clear message” to those conspiring to kill multiple people that “they will pay a heavy price”.

The judge also gave Souvannarath credit for time served in custody, so she will be eligible for parole in seven years.

Police thwarted the planned attack after receiving an anonymous tip, but Souvannarath had already boarded a plane in Chicago bound for Nova Scotia.

Her co-conspirator, James Gamble, killed himself as police surrounded his Halifax-area home. Souvannarath was arrested at the airport.

A third accomplice – a local man described in court as the “cheerleader” of the plot – was previously sentenced to a decade in jail.

When Rosinski asked Souvannarath if she would like to address the court before sentencing, the 26-year-old said: “I decline.”

Before delivering sections of his decision orally in court on Friday, the judge entered new letters from Souvannarath’s parents and grandparents as exhibits in the case. The parents of both Souvannarath and Gamble were in court for the sentencing.

At the time the plot was being planned, Souvannarath and Gamble were unemployed and lived with their families.

Court documents released say online conversations between Souvannarath and her Canadian friend quickly devolved into a shared admiration for the Columbine killers, mass shootings and their murderous conspiracy to go on the shooting rampage at the Halifax Shopping Centre food court.
The Guardian

A self-confessed Nazi who called for the genocide of Jewish people has been jailed for three years.

The 22-year-old Lancashire man, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was found guilty in January of two counts of stirring up racial hatred.

Preston Crown Court heard he committed the offences in speeches at far-right gatherings in 2015 and 2016.

Judge Robert Altham said the defendant’s comment had been “intended to mobilise others”.

He said the intent of the man, who was involved with the now banned group National Action, was “clear”.

Judge Altham said: “He seeks to raise street armies, perpetrate violence against Jewish people and ultimately bring about genocide.”

He said they were “not idle comments said in the heat of the moment” and he was “resolute in his original views and withdraws nothing”.

‘Shocking and inflammatory’

The judge described an apology submitted in mitigation as “meaningless” at best, and “dishonest” at worst.

He sentenced him to 18 months in prison for each offence, to be served consecutively.

The court heard the defendant had described Jewish people as “parasites” and called for them to be “eradicated” at an event in Yorkshire.

At another demonstration he claimed Britain “took the wrong side” in World War Two.

The court heard the defendant also said: “You can call me a Nazi, you can call me a fascist, that’s what I am.”

Judge Altham said material discovered by police at his home was “as shocking and inflammatory as it is misguided”.

Wayne Jackson, defending, said his client was not making excuses for his behaviour and had been “impressionable in the past”.
BBC News

A man has been jailed for eight years today after he was found guilty of distributing extremist publications.

The man − who cannot be named for legal reasons − was found guilty of two charges of possessing documents likely to be useful to a person preparing to commit an act of terrorism and distribution of a terrorist publication.

A 33-year-old soldier − Mikko Vehvilainen – has also been jailed for eight years but details of this offence cannot be disclosed for legal reasons.

Vehvilainen, who is a lance corporal in the army and born in Finland, was arrested by officers from West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit (WMCTU) at his army base in Brecon, Powys in September 2017.

At an earlier hearing, Vehvilainen admitted a separate offence of being in possession of pepper spray.
Following a search of his military address, officers found a war hammer which had “Isaiah 48:22” carved into the handle referencing a passage from the Bible – “There is no peace, says the LORD, for the wicked”.

Also found were throwing knives, two crossbows, a number of arrows and component parts of an electromagnetic pulse device. A mannequin was found in Vehvilainen’s garage which had knife marks in the torso area.

West Midlands Police