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English Defence League founder has 14 days to pay

Tommy Robinson has been fined £900 for failing to turn up at a High Court hearing to be questioned about his finances.

Robinson, whose real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, had been expected at a hearing in March over an unpaid legal bill after he lost a libel case brought against him by a Syrian teenager last year.

Jamal Hijazi successfully sued Robinson after the then-schoolboy was assaulted at Almondbury Community School in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, in October 2018.

After the incident went viral, Robinson made false claims, including about Mr Hijazi attacking girls in his school, leading to the libel case.

Following a pre-trial hearing in November 2020, the English Defence League founder was ordered to pay more than £43,000 in legal costs.

Earlier this year, Mr Hijazi’s lawyers successfully applied for an order requiring Robinson to return to court to answer questions about his finances on March 22, but the 39-year-old failed to attend.

He was summonsed to court to face contempt proceedings in April and, at hearing on Monday, was handed a £900 penalty after admitting being in contempt of court.

Mr Justice Nicklin said: “I’ve decided to punish Mr Yaxley-Lennon’s contempt by imposing a fine.”

He added that Robinson now has 14 days to pay and could be liable to serve 28 days in prison if he fails to do so.

The High Court was previously told that Robinson was facing mental health issues at the time of the March hearing, which he claimed were a result of being harassed.

However, on Monday, Mr Justice Nicklin said: “Whatever psychiatric issues Mr Lennon had, they did not prevent him from coming to the hearing that he failed to turn up at.”

The judge later said Robinson had recently published a video asking for support, including the words “Don’t let them lock Tommy up again” and “Keep him free of the clutches of the corrupt establishment”.

Mr Justice Nicklin said he had decided to fine Robinson prior to seeing the video and that “it was never serious enough to justify a period of imprisonment”.

The High Court judge also noted that Robinson had legal aid for his barrister for Monday’s hearing, adding: “He was in no need for donations for his representation today, the state was paying for it.”

In June, Robinson appeared at the High Court to be questioned over his finances at the postponed hearing, where he told the court that, in a two-year period prior to declaring bankruptcy, he spent around £100,000 on gambling – largely in casinos.

Robinson was previously jailed after being found in contempt of court after he filmed men accused of the sexual exploitation of young girls and live-streamed the footage on Facebook, in breach of a reporting ban, outside Leeds Crown Court in May 2018.

He was sentenced to 13 months in jail after being found in contempt of court on the day of the broadcast but served just two months before being freed after that finding of contempt was overturned by the Court of Appeal in August 2018.

The case was then referred back to the Attorney General and he was jailed again in July 2019.

Following Mr Hijazi’s successful libel claim, Mr Justice Nicklin ordered Robinson to pay him damages of £100,000 and his legal costs, thought to be around £500,000.

The Independent

Michael Coyle stood for election to Westminster as the BNP candidate in Glasgow South in 2010, and as a National Front MSP candidate for Linlithgow.

Former soldier Michael Coyle

A Far-Right thug who stood as a BNP and National Front candidate in two elections is facing a substantial prison sentence for violently raping a woman and attempting to rape her teenage daughter.

A jury heard particularly distressing evidence that former soldier Michael Coyle humiliated his 39-year-old victim by using a craft knife to carve the word “s***” into her thigh; “w****” into her arm; “old” and “saggy” on her breasts, and the letters “FAT” across her stomach.

Tattooed Coyle, 40, who also rubbed the woman’s face against a rough wall leaving a burn-like mark on her cheek, was further convicted of wilfully ill-treating her children by forcing them to stand in a cold dark room for hours and of assaulting two of her sons by presenting a knife at them and hitting one of them on the face.

He was due to be sentenced at the High Court in Livingston on Monday after earlier being remanded in custody for background reports. However, when he appeared via a videolink from Addiewell Prison, West Lothian, the court was told that no-one had got in touch to interview him for a criminal justice social work report.

Coyle’s defence counsel Mark Stewart QC said: “No responsibility for that falls on Mr Coyle. He’s not been contacted. He’s anxious for the matter to proceed as soon as possible.”

Mr Stewart tendered two letters to the court in mitigation and said a new date for sentencing had been identified as 6 September at Edinburgh High Court.

Judge Alison Stirling, who earlier described the violent and controlling abuser’s case as “complex and harrowing”, adjourned the case until then.

She said: “It’s unfortunate the criminal justice social work report is not available. It was through no fault of Mr Coyle and, as far as I’m aware, it’s not the fault of the court either.

“I hope we can have that chased up and the report will be available when he appears in front of me again on 6 September in Edinburgh.”

Giving evidence against Coyle at his trial the mum-of-five told how he didn’t allow her to go out or see friends.

She said she was “on a stopwatch” any time she left the house with violent consequences if she returned late.

She claimed he raped her after accusing her of cheating on him when she returned home late from a girls’ night out.

She said he sent messages from her Facebook account to a photographer who’d taken her picture in a rock pub saying: “Did I flirt with you? I can’t remember.” Then asking if the stranger was interested in her.

Then, she said, as she was lying on the couch he started hitting her in the face with his manhood.

She told the court: “He was saying things like ‘This is what you want isn’t it, you little s***? This is what you wanted all night.’

“He kicked me in the stomach and then he told me to get back through to bed. I thought ‘That’s over’, but it wasn’t over.”

She went on: “He pushed me backwards onto the couch. He started doing that thing with his penis again saying that’s what I wanted and I was going to get it – I was going to get my wish.

“He started pushing my legs apart with his knees and I screamed but he just covered my mouth. I was on my back on the couch and he was pushing his forearm down into my face.

“He put himself inside me and he didn’t stop until he was finished. I couldn’t fight back.”

She said she once tried to flee from the house half naked but he rugby tackled her to the floor shattering her teeth so badly she lost four on one side of her mouth and two on the other.

Her daughter, now aged 18, testified that the car bodyshop worker of Livingston, West Lothian, sexually assaulted her when she was around 12 or 13 years-old.

She told how she woke up and found him straddling her, naked from waist down, and attempting to insert his penis into her mouth.

Coyle, who has had his name added to the sex offenders’ register, stood for election to Westminster as the BNP candidate in Glasgow South in 2010 and fought as National Front candidate to become a Member of the Scottish Parliament for the Linlithgow constituency.

He failed on both counts.

Daily Record

He possessed videos which ‘glorify terrorism and which promote white supremacy throughout’

An 18-year-old Oxfordshire man has pleaded guilty to Extreme Right Wing Terrorism offences. Oliver Riley pleaded guilty to a number of charges at Westminster Magistrates’ Court following an investigation by Counter Terrorism Policing South East (CTPSE).

Riley was arrested in October last year in Gloucestershire. He had uploaded several videos of a ‘neo-Nazi racist nature’ to the internet which breached UK Terrorism Act legislation.

He pleaded guilty to the following offences on Monday, July 11:

Three counts of possession of a document or record containing information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism under Section 58 of the Terrorism Act 2000.

Providing a service to others that enables them to obtain, read, listen to or look at such a publication and intended, or was reckless, as to whether an effect of his conduct would be a direct or indirect encouragement or other inducement to the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism contrary to Section 2 of the Terrorism Act 2006.

Sending by means of a public electronic communications network a message that was grossly offensive contrary to Section 127 of the Communication Act 2003.

Riley, of The Meadows, Watlington, was released on bail. He will be sentenced at the Central Criminal Court, Old Bailey, on August 19.

Head of CTPSE Detective Chief Superintendent Oliver Wright said: “Riley has recognised that he committed these offences by being in possession of videos which glorify terrorism and which promote white supremacy throughout. Some of the harmful content Riley had promotes the separation of races by violent means, along with some particularly hateful content being directed at the LGBTQ+ community. These are serious offences and I am glad that he at least acknowledged these offences by pleading guilty.”

Oxfordshire Live

Luca Benincasa, 19, is the first person to be convicted of belonging to the Feuerkrieg Division (FKD) since the far-right organisation was banned.

A “prominent member” of a banned white supremacist group has pleaded guilty to terrorism offences.

Luca Benincasa, 19, is the first person to be convicted of belonging to the Feuerkrieg Division (FKD) since the far-right organisation was banned in July 2020.

A Nazi dagger and Schutzstaffel (SS) officer’s hat were among items discovered in his bedroom in Cardiff when police raided his separated parents’ respective homes.

Appearing at Winchester Crown Court in Hampshire on Friday, the teenager pleaded guilty to membership of the FKD and four counts of collecting information likely to be of use to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism on or before February 1 2022.

The banned terrorist group, which primarily exists online, is said to promote violence and mass murder in the pursuit of a race war.

Prosecutor Dan Pawson-Pounds said: “The defendant fits into the lower end of a prominent member role as opposed to merely an active member.”

Judge Jane Miller QC remanded Benincasa in custody as she adjourned sentencing to September 20.

A flag depicting the logo of the SS, Adolf Hitler’s paramilitary organisation, was hanging on Benincasa’s bedroom wall alongside a fascist Italian flag when police conducted a raid on February 1 this year.

Parts of an SS officer’s uniform, including a hat and Swastika armband, were also seized along with items of camouflage clothing, a tactical vest and masks.

Benincasa’s laptop was found to contain extreme right-wing literature and documents, including instructions on security and how to make explosives and poisons.

An unfinished “The Feuerkreig Division Handbook” was also discovered, as were handwritten notes linked to Benincasa’s extremist ideology.

The teenager appeared in court by video-link from Chelmsford prison in Essex, wearing glasses, and rosary beads over a blue polo shirt.

Belfast Telegraph

Scott Mason has “extreme right-wing, racist, homophobic and anti-Semitic views”, police say



An extremist who possessed instructions on how to make bombs and prepare acts of terrorism has been jailed.

Counter-terror police were alerted to Scott Mason’s “racist, homophobic and anti-Semitic views” in October 2021.

Mason, 36, of Rainhill in Merseyside, was found with a document relating to a copy of the Anarchist Cookbook, as well as extreme pornographic images.

He admitted possessing information useful to a terrorist and was jailed at Manchester Crown Court for three years.

The charge related to him having an electronic copy of the banned Anarchist Cookbook on his phone.

Mason also admitted possession of extreme pornography.

His “extreme right-wing” views were alerted to counter-terror police after an incident surrounding reports of a domestic assault in 2021.

A banned push-dagger was also found during a search of Mason’s Elgin Court home.

He admitted owning the weapon in January and was jailed by magistrates for three months.

Mason admitted the two other charges in April and was sentenced on Thursday.

Det Supt William Chatterton, of Counter Terrorism Policing North West, said the sentencing of Mason “reaffirms our commitment to making sure those who pose a risk to our society will be pursued and prosecuted”.

BBC News

Four people, who advocated racist violence and the manufacture and possession of weapons, have been jailed for a combined total of over 30 years, following a trial at Sheffield Crown Court.

Mr Justice Spencer jailed Daniel Wright, Liam Hall, Stacey Salmon and Samuel Whibley for a combined total of 31 years during a sentencing hearing held Sheffield Crown Court on Thursday, June 23, after jurors found them guilty of a combined total of 18 offences following an 11-week trial at the court.

The jury heard how the defendants, whose offending was exposed by an undercover officer, came together in a private online chat group to share extreme right-wing views and propaganda, influence and indoctrinate others and endorse the use of violence to further their cause.

Officers from Counter Terrorism Policing North East arrested the group in May last year, and a spokesperson for the policing team described how ‘a partially constructed 3D printed firearm was recovered from the home of Hall and Salmon in Keighley, West Yorkshire.

Liam Hall, Stacey Salmon, Daniel Wright and Samuel Whibley were jailed for a combined total of 31 years, during a sentencing hearing held at Sheffield Crown Court on Thursday, June 23

The spokesperson added: “Examination by a specialist confirmed that despite being incomplete, the weapon could have proved lethal if fully assembled. Other weapons were also recovered from the homes of the defendants, in addition to chemicals, practical guides for making explosives and extreme right-wing texts and videos.”

The four defendants were jailed for a combined total of 31 years, with Wright, 30, of Whinfield Avenue, Keighley, West Yorkshire, given a 12-year custodial sentence and upon release will be subject to a Serious Crime Prevention Order and a 30-year Part 4 Notification Order. He was found guilty of seven offences including manufacturing a firearm.

Hall, 31, of Hill Top Walk, Keighley, West Yorkshire, was found guilty of an offence of manufacturing a firearm and possessing a firearm and was sentenced to a 6-year custodial sentence. He will also be subject to a Serious Crime Prevention Order upon release.

Salmon, 31, of Hill Top Walk, Keighley, West Yorkshire, was found guilty of an offence of possessing a firearm and was sentenced to a three-year custodial sentence.

Samuel Whibley, 30, of Derwen Deg, Menai Bridge, Isle of Anglesey, was found guilty of eight terrorism offences including the encouragement of terrorism and the dissemination of a terrorist publication encouraging terrorism. He was sentenced to a 10-year custodial sentence and upon release will be subject to a Serious Crime Prevention Order and a 30-year Part 4 Notification Order.

Speaking after the sentencing, Temporary Detective Chief Superintendent Peter Craig, the Head of Counter Terrorism Policing North East, said: “Today’s outcome highlights the seriousness of the offences committed by these individuals and the verdict reached by the Jury in March.

“We work tirelessly to identify individuals who have an extremist mindset and threaten the safety and unity of our diverse communities.

“Anyone found to be engaging in terrorist activity, or violent extremism in any form, can expect to be identified and put before the courts.”

If anyone sees or hears something that doesn’t seem right, online or in the real word, they are encouraged to trust their instincts and ACT by reporting it to police in confidence at gov.uk/ACT. In an emergency, always dial 999.

Sheffield Star

Luke Stilwell, 40, threw a pyrotechnic device from a window at police

Before Luke Stilwell was arrested, he threw fireworks from his window and threatened police

A man has been jailed for four years and given an extended licence of four years for assaulting emergency workers, affray, possession of an imitation firearm and production of cannabis.

Luke Stilwell, 40, was arrested at his Turnock Gardens home in West Wick after he barricaded himself inside the property and threw a pyrotechnic device from the window at police officers.

The 17-hour siege happened between 11 am on Tuesday, January 25 and 4 am on Wednesday, January 26 and, caused a small number of neighbouring properties in Weston-super-Mare to be evacuated while a cordon was put in place as a precaution.

An Avon and Somerset Police spokesperson said: “Specialist officers including negotiators and armed officers, then worked with other emergency services to bring the incident to a safe conclusion with Stilwellleaving his property at 4am.”

Adding that Mr Stilwell admitted to affray, possessing an imitation firearm with intent to cause fear of violence, nine counts of assaulting an emergency worker and the production of cannabis.

The statement continues: “When sentencing on Thursday 9 June His Honour Judge James Patrick said Stilwell’s actions were more than public servants should have to put up with.

“During the incident, Stilwell shone a laser device at the officers’ eyes and one officer’s hearing was affected after the pyrotechnic device went off next to them. Thankfully we’re not aware of any officer suffering lasting injury.”

Bristol Post

In one video he made refference to George Floyd and shared others of black people being racially abused

Anthony Barraclough was jailed for six years / Met Police

A man has been jailed for six years for terrorism and public order offences following a Met Police investigation.

Anthony Barraclough, 40, of east London was found to have shared “appalling” far-right racist material online, detective chief superintendent Dominic Murphy said.

Between November 2020 and February 2021, he was found to have shared hate speech promoting white supremacy and advocating terrorist violence.

In one video he made refference to George Floyd and shared others of black people being racially abused.

Barraclough was arrested on 25 February 2021 and was sentenced to six years in prison at Kingston Crown Court on June 10.

Mr Murphy added: “Barraclough posted appalling racist material online, with the intention of encouraging others to adopt his extremist views and hatred of black people.

“This kind of online activity is poisonous and dangerous – it is not harmless idle talk, and it often has serious real-world consequences.

“Officers acted quickly to identify the offending content, and investigate and arrest the person posting it.”

Appearing at Kingston Crown Court on May 6, 2022, Barraclough admitted to the following offences:

– Three counts of dissemination of a terrorist publication (contrary to section 2(1) of the Terrorism Act 2006).

– Six counts of distributing written material to incite racial hatred (contrary to section 19(1) of the Public Order Act 1986).

– One count of distributing a recording to incite racial hatred (contrary to section 21(1) of the Public Order Act 1986).

LES

National Action was founded in 2013 by Ben Raymond and Alex Davies (pictured)

“Probably the biggest Nazi of the lot.”

That is how jurors heard Alex Davies, a “terrorist hiding in plain sight”, described during his latest trial.

Davies, 27, from Swansea, co-founded the neo-Nazi group National Action in 2013. He had seen it “grow from its small base in south Wales” to a national organisation, a judge said.

He was convicted of membership of a proscribed organisation between December 2016 and September 2017 after a trial at Winchester Crown Court in May.

Davies was then jailed for eight and-a-half years during sentencing at the Central Criminal Court, the Old Bailey in London on 7 June.

National Action was one of the most extreme British far-right terror groups since World War Two.

Its members openly celebrated the death of Jo Cox MP and called for a “race war”.

One expert said the group was “so extreme you can’t go any further”.

Davies, who was once pictured giving a Nazi salute in a German concentration camp, remains an ardent national socialist with extreme far-right views.

His organisation preyed on young people, grooming them to follow his racist beliefs.

He lived in Uplands, Swansea, and his parents disagreed with his racist views.

Describing himself as “polite” and “high-achieving”, with others referring to him as bright and articulate, Davies said he “survived school and college but got into trouble at university”.

He joined the far-right British National Party as a teenager and was identified as a potential extremist through the Prevent counter-terrorism programme when he was just 15 or 16 years old.

A few years later, he left university when his far-right beliefs were exposed.

He then focused much of his time in growing National Action from his base in Swansea, heading up the south-west “branch”.

Alex Davies was pictured doing a Nazi salute at Buchenwald concentration camp

His attempts to spread his beliefs far and wide led to ambitions to stand for election in Swansea in 2017 after National Action was deemed a terrorist organisation by the UK government.

He attended National Front meetings in Bridgend in 2017, and wanted to stand as a county councillor.

Det Supt Anthony Tagg, a senior counter-terrorism officer, said he remained a danger.

He said: “He admits that he still holds that ideology, but states there’s nothing wrong with him holding that ideology, that he’s free to have those thoughts and ideas.

“We would say those are very dangerous thoughts and ideas. Somebody who sought, through violence, to forward that neo-Nazi ideology, we would say, remains a very dangerous individual”.

He added: “Working with partners and others we will seek to continue to mitigate any risk Alex Davies poses to communities across the UK.”

However, Davies was far from the only member of National Action with links to Wales.

Alex Davies and Ben Raymond founded the group

Ben Raymond, who co-founded the group with Davies, lived in Mumbles, Swansea, and was responsible for much of its racist, offensive propaganda.

He coined the term “white jihad” and was jailed last year for being a member of National Action.

Mikko Vehvilainen was a serving British Army soldier based at Sennybridge barracks in Powys when he was a member of National Action.

A self-confessed racist, he built up a private arsenal and wanted to turn the village of Llansilin in Powys, where he had a house, into a white nationalist stronghold. He was jailed in 2018.

Ben Raymond retweeted a post celebrating Jo Cox’s murder, the court heard

Alex Deakin, a former student in Aberystwyth, ran the West Midlands branch of National Action and spoke about modelling the group along the lines of the “IRA and Viet Cong”.

He was found with two explosives manuals, including a guide to making explosives, and was convicted of membership of National Action.

In 2015, Zack Davies, a 25-year-old National Action member from Mold, Flintshire, used a hammer and machete to attack a Sikh dentist in a Tesco store because of his skin colour.

Zack Davies shouted “white power” during the assault and was later convicted of attempted murder.

He had earlier posed for a selfie in front of a National Action flag while holding a blade.

Several members of NA had read and accessed copies of the manifesto of mass-murderer Anders Breivik – who killed 77 people, mostly children, in bomb and gun attacks in Norway in 2011.

Members held vocal rallies up and down the country, dressed in black, reminiscent of Oswald Moseley’s fascists of the 1930s, delivering Nazi-style salutes and carrying flags, some stating “Hitler was right”.

Alex Davies has become the 19th person to be convicted for membership of the banned fascist group.

National Action promoting one of its “conferences”

Alex Davies was described as “the founder, the galvaniser, the recruiter”, and would welcome fellow neo-Nazis to Swansea, take them for days out in Mumbles and for ice cream.

He jokingly told jurors: “The life of a terrorist.”

Prosecutors and counter terror police believe Alex Davies is unique in British history for founding two far-right terrorist organisations.

First National Action, and then the “continuity group” as it was described in court, NS131. They are organisations that now sit alongside the likes of so-called Islamic State, the IRA and Al-Qaeda.

It was put to Alex Davies in court: “You are a neo-Nazi, yes?”

He replied: “Sure.”

BBC News

A 27-year-old man described in court as a Nazi has been jailed for eight-and-a-half years for being a member of a banned fascist group.

Alex Davies, of Swansea, was a member of National Action (NA) after it was outlawed in December 2016.

A jury found him guilty after it heard NA had not disbanded after its ban, but morphed into regional factions.

He was sentenced on Tuesday at the Central Criminal Court, the Old Bailey in London.

Judge Mark Dennis QC also ordered him to spend a further year on extended licence.

During his trial at Winchester Crown Court, he was described as “probably the biggest Nazi of the lot”.

Some members of the group had celebrated the murder of MP Jo Cox and advocated a so-called “race war”.

Addressing the defendant in the dock, Judge Dennis said: “You are an intelligent and educated young man but you have held, over a period of many years, warped and shocking prejudices.”

‘Continuity faction’

Davies co-founded NA in Swansea in 2013, before leaving to study at Warwick University, in Coventry, a university he was subsequently forced out of due to his extremist views.

Prosecutor Barnaby Jameson told the court Davies had set up a group called National Socialist Anti-Capitalist Action or NS131, which was also banned by the UK government.

Mr Jameson described it as a “continuity faction” of NA that covered the southern part of Great Britain.

Saying it was “expanding and recruiting”, he called Davies a “terrorist hiding in plain sight”.

Mr Jameson said NA and NS131 used the same colours, encrypted internet provider and ideology – a throwback to Nazi Germany – as well as the same leader, and regional structure.

He added: “Who was at the centre of all this? The founder, the galvaniser, the recruiter, one Alex Davies of Swansea. He was probably the biggest Nazi of the lot.”

‘Ideology of hatred’

In his defence, Davies claimed that NS131 was not set up as a continuation of NA and had different aims and processes, and he was only “exercising his democratic rights”.

Davies was the 19th person to be convicted of membership of NA, the first right-wing organisation to be banned since World War Two.

National Action was founded in 2013 by Ben Raymond and Alex Davies (pictured)

Fellow founder Ben Raymond, 33, of Swindon, had previously been found guilty at a separate trial of membership of a banned terrorist group.

In December last year, Raymond was jailed for eight years with a further two years on extended licence.

Together, Davies and Raymond had worked since the group’s creation in spreading an “ideology of hatred”, described as “incredibly dangerous” by counter-terrorism police.

The government acted after members of the organisation celebrated the actions of murderer and neo-Nazi Thomas Mair, who killed MP Jo Cox in June 2016.

Among those convicted of membership since December 2016 have been British soldier and Afghanistan veteran, Finnish-born Mikko Vehvilainen, and former Met probationary police officer Ben Hannam.

One of the group’s associates was convicted of making a working pipe bomb, while another, Jack Renshaw, of Skelmersdale, Lancashire, later admitted plotting to kill MP Rosie Cooper with a machete.

Social media savvy

He was jailed for life with a minimum of 20 years.

Renshaw’s plot was only foiled after a National Action member blew the whistle on his former friends, reporting the plan to counter-extremist group Hope Not Hate, which passed the information to police.

NA was social media savvy, boasting self-taught propagandists among its ranks, though its membership never exceeded 100.

They created slick computer-generated imagery – including logos, and slogans for stickers, leaflets and posters – and targeted young people in particular for recruitment.

Some of their literature called for “white jihad”, but they had also created a policy document to “make way for national socialism to enter British politics”.

Other material had designs glorifying the anti-semitic messaging of Hitler’s Germany or praising the work of SS death squads.

BBC News