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A man accused of storing grenades, mines and chemical weapons at his farm had an interest in Nazi Germany and white supremacy, a court has heard.

Russell Wadge was charged after counter-terrorism police raided his property in Trimsaran, Carmarthenshire.

Newport Crown Court heard large stocks of chemicals found in June 2019, “could kill or injure” when combined.

Mr Wadge, 58, denies 28 charges of possessing explosive devices and chemical weapons.

The court heard Mr Wadge “proudly admitted” making hydrogen cyanide, “one of the most rapidly acting poisons known to man”.

‘Cyanide in freezer’

Tom Little QC, prosecuting, said: “We need to consider the B – word – not Boris but Brexit.

“There were those frustrated by the delays to the Brexit process who were agitating, but they did not have access to this range of chemicals.”

He said hydrogen cyanide was discovered in the freezer, and a pint-glass containing a liquid with a sticker indicating poison was found “between the salad cream and ginger beer” in the fridge.

The jury heard internet searches showed significant interest in the white supremacist terror attack in New Zealand in 2019.

When questioned by police, Mr Wadge said he did not believe in any extremism and had a “keen interest” in chemistry.

However, Mr Little said: “This is not a case about naïve enthusiasm in chemistry – we say it is so much more.”

The jury heard books describing how to make improvised plastic explosives, three jars of gunpowder and the ingredients to make a “very dangerous explosive” called TATP (triacetone triperoxide), as used in the Manchester Arena bombing, were found.

Boxes of grenades, mines and scale drawings of a KGB weapon to deploy hydrogen cyanide were also discovered and Mr Wadge had researched an antidote, Mr Little said.

The prosecution said the accused man told police, “if it’s dodgy or poison, I love it” and sought out restricted information for “the thrill or buzz of it”.

Mr Wadge earlier admitted five charges of unlawful possession of poisonous chemicals without a licence.

The trial continues.

BBC News

Harry Vaughan, 18, arrested by police during a probe into website Fascist Forge
Detectives found memory stick in his bedroom with details of 128 other accounts
Court documents say there was content linked to an American neo-Fascist book
Some was found on USB with Tiffin School in London logo, where Vaughan went

A former pupil at an elite grammar school has admitted downloading and distributing bomb-making manuals.

Harry Vaughan, 18, was arrested by police during a probe into a website named Fascist Forge, which calls itself a ‘home for the 21st century fascist’.

Detectives found a memory stick in his bedroom with details of 128 other internet accounts, including one for System Resistance Network, which supports white supremacy and attacks immigration and gay rights.

Court documents revealed there was also content linked to an American neo-Fascist book called Siege and neo-Nazi, anti-Semitic and Satanic material.

Some of it was found on a USB stick carrying the logo of Tiffin School, the grammar Vaughan had attended in Kingston, south-west London.

When he was arrested last June he was studying for A-levels in maths and computer science and was said to be among Tiffin’s best performing pupils.

The school, which counts former England cricket captain Alec Stewart among former pupils, accepts just 140 students a year from 1,300 applicants. It boasts that 85 per cent of its A-level grades are between A* and B.

Police discovered that in January last year, when Vaughan was just 16, he had published three images and a message on Fascist Forge that were intended to encourage terrorism.

He also published two links on the website to a publication called Wrong Hand: popular weapons manuals and their historic challenges to a democratic society.

Police discovered a wealth of terrorist material on his computers, including a manual with chapters on murder, rape, kidnap, arson and bombing.

He also had documents showing how to make ‘new and improved’ C-4 and Semtex plastic explosives and how to construct a homemade detonator.

Further searches of his electronic devices revealed he had downloaded two indecent photographs of children between April 13 and June 14, 2019.

Vaughan, who lives in Twickenham with his parents and two younger sisters, was charged on March 11 this year.

He appeared at Westminster Youth Court yesterday to plead guilty to 12 counts of possessing documents useful for terrorism, two counts of encouraging terrorism and two counts of possessing indecent images of children.

Addressing the teenager’s parents at the back of the court, chief magistrate Emma Arbuthnot said: ‘It is a nightmare situation for parents but it is important that you are here to support him.’ Vaughan will appear at the Old Bailey for sentencing on October 2.

His bail conditions state he is not permitted to delete the internet history on any digital device or to create a social media profile under any name other than his own.

He has to share his browsing history and passwords with police and may not share extreme Right-wing ideology.

And he is not allowed to possess or use any digital device capable of accessing the internet save for a nominated digital device and his family’s smart TV.

Daily Mail

The man behind the plot to blackmail Tesco for £1.4m by contaminating jars of baby food was a Ukip MP candidate and a Grimsby Conservative chairman

The man at the centre of the biggest blackmail investigation in the UK is a former North East Lincolnshire councillor and Ukip parliamentary candidate, it can be revealed.

Sheep farmer Nigel Wright is facing up to 14 years in jail for blackmailing Tesco over baby food contaminated with shards of metal.

He represented Freshney ward in Grimsby after winning the seat in 2003, campaigning to reduce crime and the fear of it.

Previously he served as the chairman of the Great Grimsby Conservative Association, when he was the youngest ever to be appointed to the position at the age of 29.

Wright switched to Ukip and stood for the Brigg and Goole Constituency in 2010

But at The Old Bailey on Thursday, the former Healing farmer was convicted of contaminating jars of baby food with shards of metal in an elaborate blackmail of superstore giant, Tesco.

He demanded £1.4 million in Bitcoin from the retailer in return for information about where he had hidden the jars.

Wright, 45, and a married, father of two is facing up to 14 years in prison for his actions.

A sheep farmer in Market Rasen for the past 10 years, living at Pine Meadows, Caistor Road, Wright, denied the charges, but was convicted by jury of two counts of contaminating goods and three counts of blackmail. He claimed he was threatened by a group of travellers.

The court heard two mothers found the metal fragments when they were feeding their children after Wright began his two-year campaign in the spring of 2018.

He threatened to inject tins of fruit with cyanide and salmonella unless the supermarket giant handed over the cash in Bitcoin.

Wright signed off his emails and letters ‘Guy Brush & the Dairy Pirates + Tinkerbell the naughty fairy,’ and claimed he represented dairy farmers who had been underpaid by Tesco.

He triggered two nationwide recalls on both Cow & Gate and Heinz baby food as a result of the threats, prompting the supermarket to clear 140,000 products from the shelves.

A detective posed as a Tesco employee named Sam Scott and handed over £100,000 in the crypto-currency to trap the blackmailer.

Wright was caught on CCTV buying wine and flowers for his wife after placing a contaminated jar on the shelves of a Tesco branch in Lockerbie in Scotland on November 29 last year.

He also placed two jars of contaminated food on the shelves of a Rochdale shop.

Prosecutor Julian Christopher, QC, said the blackmailer took ‘delight’ in his extravagant plan to outsmart the supermarket giant.

He believed he could ‘get rich’ without leaving any trace of his identity by using the bitcoin cryptocurrency and downloading the browser Tor allowing for anonymous communication.

But his emails and letters were forwarded onto police and he was soon unwittingly interacting with an undercover officer.

A draft of an email to Tesco was found on one of Wright’s devices after his property was searched. The threat read: “Imagine a baby’s mouth cut open blood pouring out and the inside of their belly cut and bleeding.”

He was remanded in custody ahead of sentence due to take place at a date to be fixed after pre-sentence reports are prepared.

The sentencing next month at The Old Bailey is a world away from his respected role as the Conservative councillor for Freshney ward, which he won in 2003 along with businessman Paul Brewster and fellow councillor Peter Bellini.

Campaigning for the Freshney ward, aged 28, he said: “My aim is to make the community a clean and safer place, where children can play happily and people do not fear to venture out after dark.”

Wright campaigned for better flood defences in 2007. At his farm at Healing thousands of pounds worth of crops were devastated in floods. A prize ewe he owned drowned, but he managed to save a flock of around 50 of his sheep. Silage from a nearby turkey farm had contaminated flood water.

His animals were again in the news when one of his rams was killed by a dog. Wright called on all dog owners to ensure their pets were kept on a lead after that incident.

Having lost the seat at a later election, he then stood for the Conservatives in Heneage ward in Grimsby in May 2007, but only secured 435 votes.

He told voters he was fan of Road Wars and the Lord of the Rings Trilogy. He campaigned to reduce crime and fear of it.

In a debate about school exclusions he said school should not have their hands tied in order to expel unruly kids. He also expressed outrage when there was an arson attack on bales of straw near his then farm on Marsh Lane, Healing.

When someone shot a swan on the River Freshney he told the Grimsby Telegraph “Unfortunately there are people out and about who take pleasure out of doing this” and he called for people to be “more responsible.”

In a debate in the council chamber about nuisance tenants he said it was essential to monitor behaviour and also to take preventative action.

He campaigned with Councillor Bellini to support police to get tough with gangs “terrorising the streets of Willows and Wybers” and branded them “a mindless minority.”

He also served on the Humberside Fire Authority.

The current Conservative Leader of North East Lincolnshire Council, Councillor Philip Jackson said: “Clearly what he has done is wrong and I would not defend anything he has done, not for a moment.”

Operation Hancock, as the investigation was codenamed, has been the largest blackmail inquiry ever conducted in the UK and was led by Hertfordshire Assistant Chief Constable Bill Jephson, who said: “Throughout this investigation, our key focus was to safeguard the public and identify the individual or group involved as they clearly had no concern for the impact of their actions.

“I want to extend my sincere thanks to all those officers, specialist law enforcement units and agencies who gave of their best in what was often a fast-moving and challenging investigation where no stone was left unturned. This was truly a partnership response which also involved close collaboration with the victim companies who were highly responsive and operationally supportive throughout.”

Assistant Chief Constable Jephson added: “Through the determined efforts of so many dedicated professionals, a dangerous offender is now facing the justice he deserves. I hope the conviction of Nigel Wright will serve as a deterrent to anyone who thinks blackmail is a viable criminal option. The resources available to law enforcement to respond to threats of this nature are significant as crimes like this will simply not be tolerated.”

Grimsby Telegraph

A SALTBURN man has been jailed for pushing a police officer down a flight of stairs during an anti-Black Lives Matter protest in London.

Jamie Dewing, 31, of Valley View, Saltburn was sentenced to two years in prison at Teesside Crown Court today (Tuesday).

He had previously appeared at Teesside Magistrates’ Court on Thursday, July 8 where he admitted one count of assaulting an emergency service worker and one count of violent disorder.

He had been remanded in custody by the court awaiting sentence.

On June 13, Dewing had travelled from Saltburn to join hundreds of demonstrators protesting in Parliament Square.

Very early into the day, a small minority of demonstrators, including Dewing, became increasingly hostile to police officers.

At around 1pm, Dewing fronted up to officers who were policing the crowds near to the Nelson Mandela statue.

Officers had made their way there to retrieve from the crowd a woman from the opposing Black Lives Matter protest, as there was serious concerns for her wellbeing.

Officers were taking the woman to safety and were moving away from the crowd, when Dewing violently shoved the female police officer.

As a result, she fell backwards down steps and onto her back, causing injury to her back and neck and although she has returned to duty she is still receiving physiotherapy.

Dewing’s violent behaviour didn’t stop there, and throughout the rest of the day he was caught on camera acting aggressively, including throwing items such as a metal barrier at officers and repeatedly spitting at officers at cordons along Whitehall.

As part of the investigation, his image was released to the media by the Metropolitan Police and he was identified by an officer from Cleveland Police.

DC Nicky Dixon, part of the investigation team, said: “Dewing assaulted an officer who was only trying to protect a member of the public. This officer braved a hostile crowd to carry out the rescue of someone who was vulnerable. Having come to the woman’s aid, the officer was moving away when Dewing assaulted her. There is no excuse for this or his later actions, it was just thuggery.

“I’d like to thank Cleveland Police for their help in identifying Dewing. When arrested he initially denied that he was responsible, but officers had gathered extensive evidence. When faced with the overwhelming evidence against him, he pleaded guilty and has rightly been sent to prison.”

Northern Echo

He claimed his views were ‘normal for the area’

David Holmes was congratulated by one Far Right movement for ‘a good job in Heanor

This racist with an infatuation with the Far-Right peppered lamp posts and bus stops with Neo-Nazi stickers, including one with an emoji of Adolf Hitler.

On them were offensive slogans such as “Muslim scum out” and “Hitler was right”, one of which was found by a horrified headteacher outside a primary school.

Derby Crown Court heard how David Holmes also displayed a Ku Klux Klan figurine in his Heanor window.

He also put bottles of his “potent” homemade wine on neighbours’ doorsteps. On them were written more racist slogans, including “black lives don’t matter,” “save my race” and one celebrating Klaus Barbie, a Gestapo officer known as the Butcher of Lyon and who tortured and killed Jews during the Second World War.

Jailing the 63-year-old married Holmes for a year, Recorder Stuart Sprawson said: “You have deeply-held entrenched views about other people of different ethnicity to you.

“One of the people to complain was the headteacher of a primary school concerned about the impact this would have on the pupils and totally against the views being taught there.”

Siward James-Moore, prosecuting, said the offensive stickers were placed around Ilkeston, Heanor, Mapperley, in Shipley Park and on the Nutbrook Trail during 2019.

He said police received a number of complaints about them.

Mr James-Moore said: “Some said ‘deport illegal immigrants’ and other showed an emoji of Adolf Hitler with a hand written note which read ‘Muslim scum out’ and ‘Hitler was right’.

“More of the Hitler stickers were found around Heanor and Langley Mill and were forensically analysed and linked to this defendant through a fingerprint.

“Another sticker was found on a bus stop and showed a white toddler with a shaved head and the number 88 on it which is a link to a far-right ideology linked to Hitler’s birthday and the letters HH for ‘Heil Hitler’.”

Mr James-Moore said Holmes was arrested at his home address in Ashforth Avenue, Marlpool, Heanor and a number of items were seized.

He said this included letters from a Far-Right movement the defendant is a member of congratulating him for “a nice job in Heanor” and to “keep up the good work”.

Mr James-Moore said: “In interview, the defendant was upfront and frank, telling police he had placed more stickers around Shipley Park and on the Nutbrook Trail.

“He said his views were the normal views of people living in the area and were not offensive.

“He said he had issues with extensive immigration and what he called the ‘dilution of Aryan blood’.”

Mr James-Moore said after being released on bail for that series of offences, Holmes’ next offence happened on December 14, 2019.

He said he placed a US Confederate flag in his window and a figurine of a Ku Klux Klan member wearing a conical hat which was reported to the police by neighbours.

Mr James-Moore said the final set of offences involved the bottles of wine with offensive and racist messages.

He said: “Finally, on July 19, the defendant went out into his garden and began arguing with a neighbour over a dispute he had about a shed they were erecting.

He told them he would burn it down and said he would send ‘200 skinheads to come and knock at your door as you’re a grass’ or words to that effect.”

Holmes, who has no previous convictions, pleaded guilty to a number of charges including racially aggravated harassment, racially-aggravated criminal damage and witness intimidation.

Joe Harvey, mitigating, said: “I had a brief conference with Mr Holmes this morning during which he told me he knows what he did was hurtful and apologises for the appalling offences.

“He describes his behaviour as ‘evil’ and that’s not far off the mark.”

As well as the jail sentence Holmes was handed a two-year restraining order not to contact his neighbour and a two-year criminal behaviour order which says he is not allowed to place stickers on any items which would be visible to other people.
Derby Telegraph

Andrew Howard now finds himself in jail

A man found with hoards of Nazi paraphernalia has been jailed for eight weeks after writing racist abuse at a prospective neighbour who wanted to move in across the road.

52-year-old Andrew Howard had watched the family from his doorstep as they viewed the empty house. The next day, he spray painted ‘We don’t want Muslims here’ across the front of the property, alongside signs stating: “No Muslims here, f*** off”, and “you’re not wanted here, you Musrat scum, f*** off back to your own country,” Manchester Magistrates Court heard.

The family were going to move into the house but, after Howard’s racist graffiti, decided against it.

A police search of Howard’s house revealed a vast array of racist items such as Nazi flags – that were hung inside – a hanging picture of Adolf Hitler, swastikas and copies of ‘Mein Kampf’

Officer’s also discovered a room containing ‘sophisticated radio equipment’ and numbers – the door to the room had a sign reading: “Do good for the community – shoot a P***”.

In a victim personal statement, the father of the family who viewed the house said: “We no longer want to move into the address.

“I don’t feel safe there with my family. I don’t feel like my children can play in the street, as I feel someone will harm them.

“I don’t feel like my wife can go outside as someone will harm her.

“This is the first time something like this has happened to me – why does someone have to hurt someone because of religion?

“I’m also worried because my wife wears Muslim dress and it’s made me fear for her safety in that area.”

Howard, of Newton Heath, pleaded guilty to one offence of racially aggravated harassment.

Outlining the facts of the case, prosecutor David Morgan said on April 18 last year, the victim and his family went to view the house, and being happy with it, they wished to take the tenancy.

“That day they noticed a male watching them on his doorstep across the road as they looked around the area,” Mr Morgan said.

“The next day they went to the house to find ‘we don’t want Muslims here’ spray painted on the front door.

“On the water pipe it said ‘No Muslims here, f**k off’.

“Then along the front of the property it said: ‘you’re not wanted here, you Musrat scum, f**k off back to your own country.’

“The family immediately left the house and pulled out of the tenancy.

“As a result of this graffiti, police undertook a house search of the defendant and they found a substantial amount of racist paraphernalia.

“This included three Nazi flags which were hung from the property, swastikas and books.

“There was also a room containing a large amount of sophisticated radio equipment and phone numbers, and on the front of the door a sign read: “Do good for the community, shoot a P***’.

“There was also a painting of Adolf Hilter which was on the wall and copies of ‘Mein Kampf’.

Howard was said to have no previous convictions.

In an earlier hearing, it was suggested that he had served time in the army and as a result suffered from PTSD.

However, following the preparation of a pre-sentence report and various investigations, this was proved not to be the case.

In mitigation, Howard’s defence lawyer Daniel Weed said: “In the pre-sentence report there is reference to the defendant serving in the army – that is not correct.
Manchester Evening News

Detectives investigating motive of suspected shooter who died in crash while trying to flee

Detectives are continuing to investigate the shooting of a children’s author and parish councillor whose suspected attacker died in a police chase after trying to flee on a motorcycle.

The victim, James Nash, 42, is critically ill in hospital after receiving serious head injuries during the daytime attack in the Hampshire village of Upper Enham. His wife, Sarah, a specialist in satellite technology, received minor injuries in the incident, which happened on Wednesday afternoon.

Police are still investigating the motive of the suspected attacker, Alex Sartain, 34, who lived near Nash. Sartain was a mechanic and was jailed in 2016 for theft while on a suspended sentence for assault and for driving while under the influence of drugs. On social media he followed pages dedicated to figures connected to German Nazis and once wrote “I come with a warning label”.

Police have not said what weapon was used in the attack but some local people have claimed it was a homemade shotgun.

Phil North, the leader of Test Valley borough council, sought to reassure residents, telling them officers were confident that the deceased rider was the perpetrator of the shooting.

Describing Nash as a “hands-on” councillor, North said: “I know James well and have worked with him on a number of projects … I’m still utterly shocked at this terrible incident.

“James is such a kind-hearted individual who cares deeply for his community. He is also a talented children’s author and illustrator and I was extremely touched last year when one of the dedications in his latest book was to my newborn daughter.”

He added: “My thoughts remain with James, his family and the people of Enham Alamein. I hope and pray that he makes a recovery. We’re all with you, James.”

Hampshire police said investigations were at an early stage but they did not believe there were any outstanding suspects.

Sartain is believed to have initially fled the scene on foot before trying to get away on a motorbike. He was involved in a fatal crash on an A-road about 3 miles from Nash’s home.

Nash, who is also an artist, has written children’s books including the self-illustrated The Winter Wild.

Kit Malthouse, the MP for north-west Hampshire, who is also the minister for crime and policing, said he had been briefed by a senior officer and that his thoughts were with the family.

The Guardian.

The chemical engineer claimed he was making fireworks at HMP Wakefield

A white supremacist who stabbed an elderly man to death and planted home-made bombs at mosques has admitted making an explosive substance in his cell at a maximum-security jail.

Self-radicalised extremist Pavlo Lapshyn, 32, a chemical engineer, used salt, copper wire, pencil and other substances to form an ingredient which could be used to cause an explosion.

When officers at the category A prison HMP Wakefield found a plate with a white substance on it in his cell in August 2018, he told them he was trying to make a firework.

HMP Wakefield is known as Monster Mansion due to the number of high-profile, high-risk sex offenders and murderers there.

Lapshyn, a Ukrainian national, had just started a work placement in the UK when he murdered 82-year-old Mohammed Saleem in Small Heath, Birmingham, by randomly stabbing the grandfather in the back with a hunting knife in 2013.

In the following months he planted bombs near mosques in the West Midlands, later stating his aim was to start a race war.

Since he was jailed for life with a minimum term of 40 years he has been assessed by psychiatrists and has an autism diagnosis along with “significant mental health problems”, Leeds Crown Court heard.

He pleaded guilty to making an explosive substance via a videolink from HMP Whitemoor, was heard singing at points during the hearing and declined to be present when Judge Tom Bayliss QC passed a two-year jail sentence.

Peter Hampton, prosecuting, said Lapshyn admitted to officers that he had been preparing chemicals during their routine search of his cell and they informed counter-terrorism specialists in the prison.

They knew of his background as a chemical engineering PhD student, his racially-motivated murder and explosives campaign, and “a long-standing interest in pyrotechnics”, Mr Hampton said.

The defendant told officers he was trying to produce potassium chloride. A smell of bleach could be detected in the cell.

A forensic expert who was called in determined Lapshyn had formed a viable explosive substance.

Attempts were made to interview the defendant about this, the court heard, but he was unable or unwilling to assist.

After moving to HMP Whitemoor, he wrote a chemical formula on his cell wall which he said was related to pyrotechnics.

Searches of his cell there found he was hiding substances including vinegar, artificial sweetener and salt.

Mr Hampton said of his offending at HMP Wakefield: “The defendant’s actions clearly caused the risk of explosion or fire within a category A prison, potentially to harm officers, other prisoners or Mr Lapshyn himself, and interferes with the general running of the prison.”

Judge Bayliss said it was right for the CPS to bring the prosecution but he would not pass a consecutive sentence as Lapshyn – whom he described as a “highly intelligent man” – was already serving a minimum term of 40 years.

He said: “He wouldn’t even be considered for release by the Parole Board until he is 65 and he is very unlikely ever to be released given his position.”

Manchester Evening Post

A JUDGE has said hooligans intent on fighting at the Portsmouth v Southampton match are not true fans.

Judge William Ashworth made the comments at Portsmouth Crown Court where he jailed 53-year-old former Ukip candidate Derek Jennings for violent disorder.

Dad-of-two Jennings punched police horse Luna twice, in the nose and mouth, ahead of kick off at the Carabao Cup third round derby match on September 24.

The trusted family man, of Laburnum Grove, Copnor, has now been jailed for 20 months with a six-year football banning order. He admitted violent disorder.

During sentencing, judge Ashworth said: ‘There’s absolutely no doubt that some of the, I won’t call them Portsmouth fans, people from the Portsmouth side of the supporting section – I won’t call them fans because they weren’t there for the football – they were there to fight.

‘They were clearly goading and threatening the Southampton contingent, singing a particular song which was clearly a group indication of a desire to engage in violence.

‘Both groups, Portsmouth and Southampton groups, were exchanging threats and goading each other, and if the police had not been there then this turbulence of threats and aggression from both groups would simply have boiled over into a vast running battle in the residential streets of Portsmouth and the damage and the results of that violence would have been wide ranging.’

More people are being prosecuted in relation to the disorder.

Sgt Leon Astley, from the shared Hampshire and Thames Valley police horse unit, said: ‘Luna was simply there to do her job and assist police in protecting the public

‘This type of behaviour is completely unacceptable.

‘Fortunately she was not injured during this incident but we’ve made sure she’s had plenty of TLC since then.’

Det Chief Insp John McGonigle added: ‘For a grown man to act in this way was deplorable, especially against an animal, who was simply there to help protect people who wanted to enjoy the game and get home safely.

‘We hope this sentence sends a clear message that we will not tolerate this type of behaviour or any disorder at any public event.

‘Action will be taken and those responsible will be investigated.’

Both he and Sgt Astley thanked the public for an ‘outpouring’ of support for Luna.

Portsmouth News

A Sunderland thug has been jailed for his part in violence which broke out in Westminster and made headlines across the country.

But it’s not the first time Daniel Allan has found himself in trouble; the thug has over 110 convictions.

The 35-year-old, who lives in Ridley Terrace in Hendon, has now been sentenced to 28 months in prison Southwark Crown Court, after pleading guilty to violent disorder at Westminster Magistrates’ Court.

He had travelled to the capital on June 13 to join in a demonstration held in Parliament Square.

Clashes broke out between protestors – who said they were protecting monuments from damage they feared would be caused by anti-racism campaigners – and police officers.

Allan was seen at 3.15pm that day, kicking a police sergeant in the back, knocking him to the ground in Bridge Street, just next to the Houses of Parliament.

The Metropolitan Police said footage of the attack was shared widely on social media, and a short time later, “officers recognised Allan due to his distinctive coloured clothing” which turned out to be a pair of luminous shorts.

He was arrested by City of London Police and later charged.

The Met Police has said the officer he struck was left with bruising to his back and was able to recover at home.

Home Secretary Priti Patel said 38 officers had been hurt during the disorder.

Back in February 2017, Newcastle Crown Court heard Allan had threatened to burn down a former partner’s home, threatening to take children hostage after smashing his way into her home and grabbing her phone.

Their ordeal happened after he had made 50 unanswered calls to the woman before he turned up drunk at her door early one January morning.

Police turned up and soon arrested Allan, who had been trying to hide in a nearby lane.

As he was sentenced 12 months after admitting burglary, the court was told at that stage he had 110 previous offences on his record.

His barrister said Allan believed his drink had been spiked and had been left distraught at the end of the relationship with the woman and had not gone to the house to steal anything.

Sunderland Echo