Archive

Public order offence

EDL protest in Walsall

EDL protest in Walsall

Thirty two men will appear in court this week to be sentenced after violence erupted at an English Defence League demonstration in Walsall last year.

Over a period of four days the defendants will all appear at Wolverhampton Crown Court for their final hearing, after being convicted of violent disorder earlier this year.

The men were arrested and charged following an investigation by West Midlands Police Force CID following violence in Walsall town centre on September 29, 2012.

A series of operations were staged across the country to arrest people suspected of involvement in the disorder, which broke out when members of the protest group tried to break through police lines.

A further 17 men have already appeared before magistrates where they have been sentenced for crimes ranging from public order offences to criminal damage.

Det Chief Insp Pete Dunn, who led the police investigation into the disorder, said: “The majority of the people who visited Walsall to protest that day were law-abiding.

“However a small number of people decided to get involved in a few ugly scenes when protestors began to try and break through police lines and throw missiles.

edl-in-walsall-protests-by-the-english-defence-league

“Thirty people were arrested at the time, and we continued to arrest people from as far and wide as Dorset and County Durham over the weeks and months that followed.

“This week sees the culmination of a detailed, painstaking investigation by a dedicated team of officers who were determined to bring those people to justice.

“We recovered many hours of CCTV, mobile phone and police footage which led to more than 450 hours of detective work to identify those responsible for bringing violence to the streets of Walsall.

“These court proceedings underline the fact that we will pursue people who commit crime in the West Midlands, no matter how long it takes, and bring them to justice.”

Chief Supt Dave Sturman, commander for Walsall and in charge of the operation on the day, added: “We recognise that the people of Walsall were both concerned and inconvenienced on the day and we hope that residents are reassured by our continuing efforts to bring those involved in disorder in the town to justice.

“The message to people intent on bringing violence to the streets of the West Midlands when attending such events is clear – we will not tolerate disorder or any form of anti social behaviour.

“The force takes a hard line against anyone who comes to the West Midlands and creates disorder, whether it be in the name of an organisation or just for devilment.

“If you commit such crimes we will track you down and ultimately you will be brought before the courts.”

Despite violence breaking out at the EDL demonstration, only a small number of protesters and police officers sustained minor cuts and bruises.

There were no serious injuries.

All 32 men will appear before Wolverhampton Crown Court to be sentenced between Monday, December 16-Thursday, December 19.

Birmingham Mail

Walsall EDL demo convictions

More EDL demo Walsall convictions.

Yet more…

Five people were found guilty of a public order offence after a controversial Irish and trade unionist march through Liverpool city centre.

The four men and one woman had all denied the charge when they appeared before District Judge Richard Clancy at Liverpool magistrates’ court.

But after a two-day trial, Mr Clancy found Paul Harrison, 31, of Windbourne Road, Aigburth ; Jason Aspinall, 41, of Cherry Lane, Walton ; Jonathan Halvorsen, 22, of Wentworth Drive, Everton ; and married couple Margaret Anders, 24, and Paul Anders, 26, of Northumberland Street, Toxteth , guilty of the charge.

They were arrested after failing to comply with a notice which required counter-protesters at the James Larkin march last July to assemble in a designated spot away from the route of the parade.

Demonstrators were told at the start of the march that they would be liable for arrest if they protested during the procession, which in previous years had been marred by scenes of public disorder.

All five of the accused were warned by officers on separate occasions during the course of the march, culminating in their arrest as it made its way along Hanover Street and The Strand.

In the case of Harrison, Aspinall, and Halvorsen, they were “chanting and gesticulating” towards the marchers in Hanover Street.

Paul and Margaret Anders, meanwhile, shouted abuse towards the parade as it made its way along The Strand.

The James Larkin march has attracted controversy from some factions who claim it is a front for Irish republicanism.

Mr Clancy said in his summing-up: “Clearly there are some feelings in this matter. You weren’t happy with the situation and you wanted to protest.

“People have the right to protest, but it has to be peaceful. We are dealing with a potential disorder situation.”

After a means assessment was carried out, Harrison and Halvorsen were each fined £100 for the offence, while Aspinall, Margaret and Paul Anders were each fined £75.

They were also ordered to pay prosecution costs.

Chief Superintendent Jon Ward, Area Commander for Liverpool North, said: “Merseyside Police is committed to ensuring that people have the right to conduct legitimate marches in the city without fear of interference, or prejudice.

“In the past marches by some groups have attracted interest from opposition groups intent on causing problems and disrupting peaceful marches through the city through the use of intimidation.

“When the Larkin March took place earlier this year we were determined to ensure that the event would take place without incident and invested significant resources in to policing the march. The force used the Section 14 powers for the first time to prevent any problems and as a result a number of people who refused to adhere to the conditions were arrested and charged.

“The sentencing at court today supports the actions taken by Merseyside Police on the day of the march and hopefully sends out a strong message for similar marches in the future.”

Liverpool Echo

A THUG who smashed a man in the face with a ceramic mug has been jailed.

Joseph Guite caused a 5cm “deep laceration” to victim Gary Costello’s face on December 7 last year.

George Matthews, prosecuting, said the attack happened in the street in Breightmet.

Guite then fled towards Bury Road.

Mr Costello had to have 10 stitches following the attack.

Joseph Guite

Joseph Guite

Guite was later identified through a Facebook photograph and was arrested by police, Bolton Crown Court heard. When Guite, aged 24, of Bridgeman Place, Bolton, was arrested he claimed he was acting in self defence.

The court heard Guite had been running after a man named Parker. Mr Costello became involved when Parker asked him to help.

Mr Costello, aged 23, in a victim impact statement, said he is paranoid about the scar he now has on his forehead and has grown his hair to try to hide it.

He believes his scar will hinder him in future job interviews and said he does not go out much now, Bolton Crown Court heard yesterday.

Guite has several previous convictions, including a public order offence for his involvement in an English Defence League Protest.

He committed the crime while he was subjected to a four-month jail term suspended for 12 months.

Carl Hargan, defending, said Guite had difficulty looking at photographs of Mr Costello’s injury and was ashamed as his mother had seen the injury pictures.

He said Guite has cut down “dramatically” on his alcohol intake.

Judge Timothy Stead, sentencing, said: “You struck him a blow to the forehead. You had in your hand, as a weapon, a mug. It doesn’t matter to me whether you had a ceramic mug or a glass or whether the mug was broken when you fell.

“The weapon was used to cause a very serious injury. It’s a wicked looking wound even when repaired.”

Guite admitted wounding and was jailed for 30 months.

His four-month suspended jail term was also activated but will run concurrently to the wounding sentence.

Bolton News

David camp - banned from Cambridge Islamic centres

David camp – banned from Cambridge Islamic centres

A man has been issued an Asbo banning him from going near a number of Islamic premises in Cambridge after he threatened to burn down a mosque.

David Camp, 35, of Thorpe Way, off Ditton Lane, Cambridge, was made subject of an anti-social behaviour order at Cambridge Magistrates’ Court yesterday after he was convicted of several racially aggravated offences..

Camp had previously admitted to posting a large number of offensive anti-Islamic messages on Twitter between April 1 and June 5. He had also admitted to three further public order offences following a drunken outburst in Mill Road on June 30 during which he shouted abuse at members of the public. During that incident Camp threatened to burn down a mosque, he continued to shout abuse at the officers who then arrived and arrested him.

He was sentenced to a 12-month supervision order with alcohol treatment requirement on July 12.

Following an application by police, a two year criminal Asbo was granted, banning Camp from entering parts of Mawson Road, Tenison Road, Devonshire Road, Mill Road or Whitechapel Road, in London. He is also banned from entering St Paul’s Road or Darwin Drive in their entirety, or from going within 50 metres of Omar Farouk Mosque in Kirkwood Road.

Sgt Matt Gadsby said: “We enjoy a rich and diverse mix of cultures and religions in Cambridge and David Camp has caused considerable distress through his behaviour so we are pleased to have secured the order in full.

“This Asbo is fundamentally about promoting public safety and protecting the rights of the community, and will hopefully provide reassurance that we will not tolerate either racism or anti-social behaviour in any form.

“Camp has now been given clearly defined boundaries by the court, and is aware of the penalty should he choose to ignore them. In publicising this matter we are now seeking the support of the community in promoting the effective reporting and enforcement of the order.”

Cambridge News

Marsden narrowly escaped a custodial sentence.

Marsden narrowly escaped a custodial sentence.

Karen Elizabeth Marsden, 40, of Castleford joined in offensive chanting as part of the EDL protest in Dewsbury town centre last June, Kirklees magistrates heard.

She then assaulted two police officers when she was arrested and police had to use CS spray to subdue her.

Marsden had denied threatening behaviour and assaulting two police officers but was convicted after a trial.

She was warned to expect jail but magistrates imposed an 18-month community order with a supervision requirement. She was ordered to pay £260 towards costs of £620. Magistrates rejected an application for an anti-social behaviour order.

23rd June 2012

Huddesfield Daily Examiner

Judge bans ‘hater’ of Muslims from every mosque in the country

An ex-soldier with a hatred of Muslims has been banned from every mosque in the land.

The life-long ban was imposed on John Parkin who stuffed tissue into a bottle of beer and attempted to set Rhyl mosque alight days after the murder of soldier Lee Rigby in Woolwich.

Mold Crown Court heard that Parkin had been infuriated by the murder of Mr Rigby and decided to try and burn down his local mosque after drinking 15 pints of beer.

Today he was jailed for 18 months and an indefinite criminal anti-social behaviour order (CRASBO) was made under which he must not enter the mosque at River Street in Rhyl – and from entering the curtilage of any mosque in England and Wales.

Judge Niclas Parry told Parkin, 27, of Towyn Way West, Towyn, that he was “an inherent racist” who was prepared to act as such and was a high risk of harm.

“There was a depressing inevitability that people such as you would claim that the tragic events involving Lee Rigby would be some form of justification for what are nothing less than the acts of bigots and yobs,” he said.

It was why Lee Rigby’s own family so commendably made a public appeal that it should not be used as an excuse for further violence.

Parkin’s disgraceful and sickening conduct was an affront to decent society, Judge Parry said.

“But the plain fact is that you acted as you did because you were drunk,” the judge told him.

After 15 pints, in the presence of others, he made it clear that he wanted to buy a bottle to ignite the local Islamic cultural centre “that forms part of your local community.”

The judge told him: “You purchased a bottle, you purchased tissues, you inserted the tissues into the bottle and walked into the ground of the mosque where you made persistent but unsuccessful attempts to light the tissue.”

He then walked off leaving the bottle on the wall when he saw the blue lights of the police approaching.

“On arrest you began to abuse the police about the problems of this country, accusing them of betraying this country.

“You even had the temerity to suggest your example should be followed about how people should be taught about Muslims. You are an inherent racist prepared to act as that. You are a high risk of harm to a certain part of this community.”

The judge said that the offences were aggravated by his previous convictions, which included two previous convictions for religiously or racially aggravated offences.

The same mosque had been targeted by him on one previous occasion.

He had pleaded guilty and the reality was there was no real prospect of a fire.

“But these shocking offences offend decent society which looks to the court to deter such offences,” he said.

Parkin admitted threatening to burn down the mosque and a charge of religiously aggravated disorderly behaviour on May 25.

Prosecutor David Mainstone said that night Parkin went to a Rhyl nightclub and was refused entry after telling staff: “I just need a bottle of strong alcohol to burn down the mosque.”

He moved on to a shop and bought a bottle of Corona beer.

CCTV operators had been alerted by the club’s door staff and police officers arrived when he was in the grounds of the mosque.

He was monitored on CCTV as he tried to light the tissue.

Arrested and cautioned, he asked officers: “Do you like Muslims?”

Mr Mainstone said he had made a “serious threat” to burn down the mosque and uttered anti-Muslim and inflammatory remarks.

Parkin repeatedly told police he did not like Muslims.

When he was interviewed later, Parkin said he was drunk and could not remember what he had said.

But he conceded those were the kind of things he would say because he said those were his views and he was entitled to have them.

He claimed those views extended from his experiences in the army.

Andrew Green, defending, said that it was an aggravating feature that it was a repeat of previous behaviour.

“What lies behind these offences is his use of alcohol and a pattern of thinking that he struggles to shake off,” Mr Green explained.

They came in the wake of the London tragedy, his response was to drink 15 pints and that led to his behaviour.

There was no real risk of a fire because he was trying to ignite a beer bottle.

His words were so outrageous that he was bound to be caught quickly, as he was.

North Wales News

Wales Online

Previously admitted to being a member of the EDL in connection with a previous offence:

Wales Online

AN anti-mosque protester avoided jail after he was found to be carrying cocaine following a street demonstration.

Warren Faulkner also offered to “sort out” his differences with a police officer when they clashed during the protest in Millfield, Sunderland.

Newcastle Crown Court was told Faulkner was among a group demonstrating about plans to build a mosque in St Marks Road.

The 42-year-old, of Webb Avenue, Westlea, Seaham, was then spotted by an officer in a back lane shouting “come on, come on, bring it on”.

The court heard Faulkner tried to trip up the officer, who was separating the right-wing demonstrators from the anti-fascist group. As he was being detained, Webb told the officer: “I will give you my phone number, and we can sort this out without your uniform on”.

Prosecutor Michael Bunch said: “Following this, a small packet of cocaine was found in his trouser pocket, with a street value of £34.”

Faulkner, who had pleaded guilty at an earlier hearing to possession of a controlled substance with intent to supply, and a public order offence, claimed he was only carrying the drug after someone asked him to keep it for them.

Vic Laffey, defending, said Faulkner had lost his job as a result of being brought before the court.

He said: “This was a straightforward agreement with the friend to keep the drugs, with no suggestion at all that he would make money or a profit from them. He intended to give the drugs back.”

Judge Simon Hickey QC sentenced Faulkner to six months in prison, suspended for 12 months. He also ordered him to do 100 hours’ unpaid work and abide by a supervision order.

Judge Hickey said: “You were there to deliberately antagonise the other group, and you offered to sort it out with him if he removed his uniform.”

The court was told Faulkner had 22 convictions, his last back in 2002.

Sunderland Echo
EDLNews