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A man who smashed his former partner’s head against a coffee table and punched her more than 20 times has been locked up for ten years.

Jonathan Youthed, 31 of Hungarton Court, Peterborough, turned up at the woman’s house covered in blood and bragging about having assaulted another man on 25 March this year.

Earlier that day, Youthed had texted his ex-partner asking what she was doing later but it was obvious from his messages that he was drunk, Peterborough Crown Court heard.

Youthed then turned up at her house at about 10pm, but an argument began after he told her he had attacked another man.

The woman asked him to leave – but he refused, sitting on the sofa.

His victim tried to make him move – which is when he then launched the brutal attack, smashing her head against the table, an aquarium and other furniture.

The assault left the woman thinking she was going to be killed – and was only stopped when her teenage son kicked Youthed in the head.

Neighbours called 999 after hearing the victim screaming during the attack – and she was described as looking like something out of a horror film by neighbours when she left the house, because of the bruising she had suffered.

When he was arrested, Youthed made racially offensive comments to a police officer.

Today (Friday) he sat head bowed in the dock has he was jailed for ten years by Judge Sean Enright.

Judge Enright said it was a ‘sustained assault’ lasting several minutes, and said: “Her breath was being squeezed out of chest and she thought she was going to die.

“There was sustained bruising and some bleeding. Part of her hair had been torn out.”

The court also heard how he had also attacked a previous partner a number of years ago.

Youthed was charged with attempted murder and wounding with intent, and denied both charges. He was convicted of wounding with intent but cleared of the more serious charge at a trial earlier this year.

He was also convicted of making threats to kill, and causing racially aggravated alarm or distress.

In a statement read to the court, the victim said three months after the attack she had only left the house twice, and described herself as a ‘recluse’ because she felt she could not trust anyone anymore.

She said: “I truly felt he was going to kill me that night. I want him to be punished.”

Emma Rance, defending, said Youthed had shown remorse. She said: “He says if there was any way he could make amends, he would.

“He clearly needs some help, and hopes to get that in custody.”

DC Tania Weston said: “This was an horrific attack, which was only stopped because the victim’s son showed incredible bravery.

“I hope this prison sentence brings the victim some closure and helps her to move on with her life as best she can.

“I also want to thank her and all the other witnesses for having the strength to give evidence during the course of the trial.”

Youthed was given an eight year sentence for wounding with intent, two years for making threats to kill, to be served consecutively, and four months for causing racially aggravated alarm or distress, to be served concurrently.

Peterborough Today

Lois Evans and Emma Storey, were yesterday jailed for imprisoning a man and subjecting him to what a judge described as a "terrifying" ordeal, during which he was battered with a hammer

Lois Evans and Emma Storey, were yesterday jailed for imprisoning a man and subjecting him to what a judge described as a “terrifying” ordeal, during which he was battered with a hammerL



TWO women who tied up and tortured a man are behind bars for what a court heard was “horrific humiliation”.

Emma Storey filmed friend Lois Evans repeatedly batter their victim with a hammer as he begged his grinning attacker to stop.

Evans threatened to use a power drill on his kneecaps and feet, and screamed at the Islam-convert: “We don’t like Muslims over here, you know. I f***ing hate them.”

Footage of the distressing attack was shown at Teesside Crown Court where Evans, 30, was jailed for three years and four months and Storey, 35, got two years and eight months.

Evans – said by a judge to be “glorifying” in the torture of the 23-year-old – later told police she felt possessed.

At one point, she threatened to kill the man, and Storey “baulked”, saying: “I agreed to this, but not to bury a body.”

During his ordeal, the victim also had some of his hair cut out, and Polyfilla put in his mouth by Evans, who told him: “Eat this. You chat a load of s***.”

Earlier, Storey shoved a rag in his mouth to gag him, as her friend produced a range of tools to threaten him with – a saw, wrench, screwdriver and the drill as well as a golf club.

In an impact statement, the victim said: “I lay awake at night thinking about why I didn’t fight back, and how humiliated I felt and still feel.

“I would have loved to have been in the army, but this makes me feel I would be no good if I can let two girls beat me up like this.

“I am constantly paranoid about what’s going on around me and who is around me.”

The women, from Guisborough, east Cleveland, had to be separated by security guards in the dock after a fight in the cells before the case. There had also been trouble between the pair while they were on remand at Low Newton in Durham.

Storey wept in the dock as her phone footage of the attack was shown in court, while Evans watched without showing any emotion.

Storey’s lawyer, Gary Wood, told the court that the mother-of-three has had a ten-year amphetamine addiction and had been drinking with her friend on the night.

“She encouraged with words spoken and filmed this horrible incident using her mobile phone, which she accepts makes her equally guilty,” he said.

“On behalf of the defendant, I am instructed to apologise to all parties in this case, in particular the complainant for everything that transpired.”

Stephen Constantine, for mother-of-two Evans, said: “She seems to have flown completely out of her mind. She told the police that she appeared as though she was possessed.

“This is a young lady who doesn’t ordinarily behave like this. She simply snapped and did a lot of things she bitterly regrets.”

Th court heard that Evans was annoyed at continued unwanted attention from the man, visited him in the early hours of April 5 and ordered him into a car to go to Storey’s home.

The victim was said to have been frightened, but wrongly believed that Storey would stop anything happening to him, said prosecutor Emma Atkinson.

Towards the end of his ordeal on the video, he can be seen on the floor where it looks as though he is being kicked by Evans.

He managed to escape, but was still bound and had Polyfilla in his hair. He suffered extensive brushing to his arms and legs and a black eye, said Miss Atkinson

Evans, of Woodhouse Road, admitted false imprisonment, religiously-aggravated assault occasioning actual bodily harm and making threats to kill.

Storey, also of Woodhouse Road, pleaded guilty to false imprisonment and assault occasioning actual bodily harm.

Judge Deborah Sherwin told the pair: “Each of you have the capacity to be violent bullies when the need, in your eyes, arises.

“It is nothing short of miraculous that his injuries were not worse.”

Neither woman had any previous convictions, the court heard.

The judge told Evans: “It is alarming that you can behave in such a way and you have it in you to act like this.”

She told Storey: “Yours was a secondary role, but in filming it, you were encouraging and egging on Miss Evans in what she was doing.”

When Miss Atkinson was about to play the footage, she warned the court several times: “It’s distressing to watch.”

After hearing screams from the victim, a couple – believed to be the victim’s parents – left the courtroom, but later returned.

Sobbing Storey shouted from the dock: “Marie, I’m sorry.”

Judge Sherwin said: “I have seen the clips and it is quite clear he is begging you to stop, he was cowering away and was clearly terrified.”

Northern Echo

Fuelled by grief, Mamba and extremism, how dad’s obsession with social workers turned to terrifying campaign to kill

Dean Killen, who said he would kill social workers in Grimsby, after the tragic death of his son

Dean Killen, who said he would kill social workers in Grimsby, after the tragic death of his son

A man who terrorised social workers had links to right wing extremists and convictions for stalking and carrying a concealed knife.

Dean Killen’s campaign of hate against Grimsby social workers was driven by the loss of his son who had died tragically while in foster care.

But his grief also masked a history of menacing behaviour, links to the far right and sinister social media posts in which he calmed he would “be killed” in a plot to overthrow the government.

Killen is now regarded as one of the most serious threats to the safety of social workers in Grimsby and North east Lincolnshire, despite starting a three year jail sentence for threatening to kill them.

North East Lincolnshire Council described Killen’s abuse and threats, as “deeply frightening for staff”.

Killen sent messages and left voicemails with individual social workers threatening to kill them. He also claimed they would be tracked down by a vigilante group named in court.

But Grimsby Live can also reveal that during his hate campaign he also contacted the far right group Britain First and its leader Paul Golding. Golding, a former British National Party member, is currently serving a jail sentence for race hate crimes.

After contacting Golding, Killen, who also followed a series of far right and extremist groups on social media, claimed in one social media post “U watch what happens if they team up with me”.

In another more disturbing post with echoes of violent extremists, Killen claimed he would “be killed” in an attempt to “replace the government” following his son’s death.

He wrote: “I hope you understand dum Britain. I will be killed but this country has destroyed me so I give your country back to you.”

One of Killen's social media posts

One of Killen’s social media posts

Killen’s hate was fuelled by the tragic death of his nine-year-old son Leon who passed away after suffering an epileptic seizure. All four of Killen’s children, aged nine to 17, had been in foster care and he had been banned from attending Leon’s funeral.

Social workers later sent a letter to Killen telling him where his son had been buried in Grimsby.

The tragic death and repercussions triggered a surge in Killen’s hate of social workers in Grimsby and also brought him into confrontations with police.

Killen was known to police in Lincolnshire where he had lived and worked around Horncastle, Boston and Lincoln.

In 2007 he had been found with a 3-inch lock-knife concealed in his jacket when police were called to a domestic incident and found him acting suspiciously in a van.

Weeks later he was banned from approaching a couple who had been his neighbours and anyone in his former estate in Horncastle.

But Killen paid no attention to the courts. A few months later, he was jailed for continuing his campaign of intimidation against the couple after it was revealed he had sent the woman a barrage of aggressive texts and confronted her in the street and outside a school.

He was arrested and jailed but later appealed against the nine month prison term. Throwing out his appeal in 2008, a judge said Killen had been guilty of “repeated, thoroughly unpleasant and intimidating behaviour” and his “flagrant disobedience” to court orders was “deliberate and repeated”.

Killen moved to Lincoln where he had worked as a handyman and skirmished with police as he increasingly turned to the so-called “zombie drug” Black Mamba.

When his son died in August last year, Killen again embarked on a targeted campaign against police and social workers, holding the authorities and individual social workers responsible for the death.

Two of the Facebook posts made by Killen before he said he would kill a social worker

Two of the Facebook posts made by Killen before he said he would kill a social worker

In November Killen received a 16 week suspended prison sentence after a violent confrontation with police.

In January he confronted police after they broke up a chaotic protest in which he had laid out a banner on the cenotaph in central Lincoln saying: “Jail for corrupt social workers, police and judges”.

A few days later he boasted of fighting in the street, posing for selfies on Facebook showing injuries to his eye and mouth, saying: “Two fights in two days. The old me is back. Av been on a lot of scuffs this past year n plenty ov em coppers. I’m not ashamed. They took my kids so I fight. I will not stop. This system has done it with me.”

A complaint about his treatment by Lincolnshire police was thrown out after he claimed they had used too much force when arresting him.

The findings reveal that one officer had to use “distracting punches” to subdue Killen and “prevent further injury to any person”.

Now obsessed with the thought of revenge against social workers or police, on January 19 he called 999 claiming his son had been murdered and that he wanted to kill someone.

He then spoke to a senior police officer on the phone telling her he was going to kill the social workers and branding one of them a “child killer”.

Convinced Killen was now so unstable, he posed a real threat to the safety of social workers and police, officers moved to arrest him. Under questioning, he told police that after the death of his son he “did not care about the lives of others”.

Killen was sentenced at Grimsby Crown Court but in the dock remained defiant. Handcuffed in the dock, Recorder Gurdial Singh commented on Killen: “It’s me he wants to thump”.

As evidence was led, Killen called from the dock “You know nothing, you know nothing.”

And as he was led to the cells, he looked across the court, saying: “When I get out, you’ll know. I shall show you what has happened when I get out.”

After the case, North East Lincolnshire Council said the case showed the challenges its social workers faced.

A spokesman for the council said: “As the evidence of this case has shown, there is and was no excuse whatsoever for the threats made to social workers, who carry out very important and sensitive work in protecting children and families in such situations.

“The actions of the defendant were deeply frightening for staff concerned and there is really no justification for him behaving like who did towards people who were carrying out their jobs in very difficult family circumstances.”
Grimsby Telegraph

Bret Atkins and Jamie Snow smirked as their jail sentences were increased for the race-hate campaign they orchestrated from inside a top security jail

Bret Atkins, 24, and Jamie Snow, 27, sent crude explosive devices from the segregation unit of Full Sutton prison, near York and sent them to law firms in Halifax and Nottingham Photo: PA

Bret Atkins, 24, and Jamie Snow, 27, sent crude explosive devices from the segregation unit of Full Sutton prison, near York and sent them to law firms in Halifax and Nottingham Photo: PA



A murderer and a robber who sent crude explosive devices from the segregation unit of a top security jail to Asian solicitors as part of a race-hate campaign have had their prison sentences increased.

Bret Atkins, 24, and Jamie Snow, 27, smirked and laughed as a judge at Leeds Crown Court was told how they constructed basic incendiary devices made from crushed match heads in their cells at Full Sutton prison, near York, and sent them to law firms in Halifax and Nottingham.

Despite Atkins and Snow appearing by videolink from different prisons – Whitemoor and Wakefield – the two managed to exchange smiles with each other as details of their racist messages were read to the court.

Atkins – who is serving a life term with a minimum term of 20 years for murdering a man in Hull in 2009 – grinned even though his barrister told the judge he had converted to Islam since arriving at Whitemoor.

Judge Rodney Jameson handed down a seven year prison sentence to Atkins, who was found guilty by a jury earlier this year of conspiracy to send an explosive substance with intent to burn.

The judge ordered this to start 18 months before the end of his current 20 year minimum term and said this would have the effect of increasing the minimum term of his life sentence to 22 years.

Snow, who is originally from Leeds, was serving an eight-and-a-half year sentence for robbery, attempted robbery and possessing a firearm with intent when he sent the letters.

He was given an extended sentence of six years and three months after admitting offences of sending an explosive substance with intent to burn and making threats to kill. The judge said the extended part of the sentence meant he will be on licence five years after he is released.

Atkins admitted murdering 35-year-old Simon Ash in Hull in 2009.

A judge at the time said he and another man had ”callously and cold-bloodedly” killed Mr Ash, who was walking alone.

They kicked him and stamped on his head so hard that an imprint of Atkins’s shoe was left on his face.

Devices were sent by the pair but, the court heard, they were intercepted before they reached their intended targets.

The judge was told that both men had a “shared racial hatred” of Asian people and had threatened to kill Asian prisoners, attack the imam at Full Sutton and burn down mosques.

As well as the incendiary devices, Snow sent threatening letters to solicitors – one including an illustration of how to make a bomb using a light bulb.

Jonathan Sandiford, prosecuting, said Snow wrote a letter to a probation officer referring to Asian people as “dirty disgusting vermin”.

Prison officers intercepted a letter sent to Rahman Ravelli solicitors in Halifax from Snow in November 2012 and found a device inside made from crushed match heads and a striking device attacked to the opening flap.

When confronted about it, Snow said “two out of three is not bad”, according to Mr Sandiford.

The prosecutor said he was “claiming he’d already sent another two”.

Mr Sandiford said Snow sent a threatening letter to another law firm, signing it “your neighbourhood Muslim-killer”.

He said prison officers heard Atkins bragging in phone calls that he and Snow were vying to kill the prison imam, saying: “Me and Snowy have got a deal – whoever gets to him first can have an ounce of amber leaf (tobacco).”

The court heard Atkins sent a letter to Carrington’s Solicitors, in Nottingham, containing another incendiary device but it was intercepted.

The message included the sign-off: “Ha, ha, ha, boom. I’ve got my eyes on you.”

Mr Sandiford said the pair also conducted a dirty protect in the segregation wing of Full Sutton when they daubed threats against Muslims on the walls of their cells in excrement.

But Philippa Eastwood, defending Atkins, said: “He had converted to Islam since he has been at HMP Whitemoor and has been a practising Muslim in the time since he had been there.”

Snow – through his barrister Richard Simons – tried to get the judge to increase his sentence to more than seven years so he could get access to a mental health course in prison to address his personality disorder and other potential psychiatric problems.

But Judge Jameson said he could not take this unusual course.

The judge told the pair it was unlikely the devices they made would have caused any more injury than burns to the hands of anyone who opened them.

But he said they “exercised considerable ingenuity in making these potentially dangerous devices out of the materials at your disposal”.

The judge said: “In both cases, you sent improvised incendiary devices by the mail, or submitted them to be sent by mail, to Asian solicitors in the north of England.

“No injury was caused by any device that you sent. It is difficult to know the extent of the distress that you caused.”

After the hearing, Detective Chief Superintendent Ian Wilson of the north east counter-terrorism unit said: “Bret Atkins and Jamie Snow waged a campaign of hate against innocent people, choosing victims purely on the grounds of their race or religion. They expressed deeply racist and anti-Muslim views and sent a series of threatening letters, designed to instil fear in their recipients.

“Snow and Atkins took their hatred beyond threats to kill and even tried to post explosive materials in an attempt to cause harm or injury. Thankfully this mail was intercepted by vigilant officers within the prison service and was never able to enter the postal system.

“Snow and Atkins may already be in prison, but they will still be held accountable. We will continue to work with the prison service to respond to racially-aggravated incidents and punish those who seek to threaten the safety and confidence of our communities.”

Marcella Goligher, governor of Full Sutton Prison, said: “We are committed to the prevention of crime and are proud of the work our vigilant and highly-skilled members of staff do to detect it.

“These convictions have been secured as a result of strong partnerships, and we will continue to work with the police and the CPS to ensure prisoners who break the law are prosecuted.”

Daily Telegraph

From Sept 2014