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Suspended sentence

Adam Rodgers

Adam Rodgers

Adam Rodgers, 28, of Woolwich, a former English Defence League (EDL) activist, threatened to burn down a mosque in retaliation for the brutal killing of soldier Lee Rigby.

Unemployed Rogers was staying with friends in Hastings when he posted a tirade of offensive and obscene remarks on Facebook. He also called on fellow EDL members to congregate at Hastings Mosque in St Leonards.

On Monday (July 15), Rogers was sentenced to 16 weeks in custody, suspended for two years, by Hastings magistrates. He was also given a supervision requirement for 24 months and ordered to pay £85 in costs and an £80 victim surcharge.

May 23rd 2013

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer

The Argus

Salvatore Allegro - James Whitbread

Salvatore Allegro, 48, and James Whitbread, 36, were both found guilty of a racially aggravated public order offence for beating up a Muslim at a tube station.

The men verbally abused Ahmed Farhan, telling him to “go back to your own country you f***ing Muslim c**t.”.

When Farhan got off the train at Bank station the two men followed him, shouting anti-Muslim abuse before punching him repeatedly. Both men were given a six month prison sentence, suspended for 18 months.

They were also both banned from engaging in any EDL activities, meetings or protests for 18 months.

Allegro was made to carry out 120 hours unpaid work while Whitbread was given an 18 month supervision requirement..The duo must each pay Mr Farhan £100 compensation as well as prosecution costs of £150.

IEngage

Matthew Tyson

Matthew Tyson, 23, of Grimsby, was sentenced at Grimsby Magistrates’ Court for posting offensive material about Muslims on an English Defence League Facebook site, Tyson wrote, Grimsby Mosques “want burning down” after soldier Lee Rigby was attacked and killed by two men in Woolwich, on May 22.

The Mosque was attacked days later. Tyson was given a 12-week curfew and must stay in his home between 6am and 8pm, apart from weekends where he must stay at his girlfriend’s home while seeing his children.

His 12-week prison sentence was suspended for six months. The court also ordered the destruction of a laptop and his smart phone.

This Is Grimsby

APOLOGY: Steven Ballard leaving court. The Facebook user claimed the furore caused by his "menacing" comment had cost him his job, girlfriend and his child.

APOLOGY: Steven Ballard leaving court. The Facebook user claimed the furore caused by his “menacing” comment had cost him his job, girlfriend and his child.

Steven Ballard, 27, of Grimsby, admitted sending an offensive or menacing message on May 23 on the Grimsby division EDL fan page on Facebook .

It read: “Burn the mosque down the end of Legsby Avenue. That will tell the clowns in charge in this country that we ain’t taking this s*** and it will start a nationwide action going. “Grimsby will be on the map big time then.”

Ballard was given a 12-week suspended prison sentence, a six-month supervision order and must pay £85 costs and a Government-imposed £80 victims’ surcharge.

This is Grimsby

AN anti-mosque protester avoided jail after he was found to be carrying cocaine following a street demonstration.

Warren Faulkner also offered to “sort out” his differences with a police officer when they clashed during the protest in Millfield, Sunderland.

Newcastle Crown Court was told Faulkner was among a group demonstrating about plans to build a mosque in St Marks Road.

The 42-year-old, of Webb Avenue, Westlea, Seaham, was then spotted by an officer in a back lane shouting “come on, come on, bring it on”.

The court heard Faulkner tried to trip up the officer, who was separating the right-wing demonstrators from the anti-fascist group. As he was being detained, Webb told the officer: “I will give you my phone number, and we can sort this out without your uniform on”.

Prosecutor Michael Bunch said: “Following this, a small packet of cocaine was found in his trouser pocket, with a street value of £34.”

Faulkner, who had pleaded guilty at an earlier hearing to possession of a controlled substance with intent to supply, and a public order offence, claimed he was only carrying the drug after someone asked him to keep it for them.

Vic Laffey, defending, said Faulkner had lost his job as a result of being brought before the court.

He said: “This was a straightforward agreement with the friend to keep the drugs, with no suggestion at all that he would make money or a profit from them. He intended to give the drugs back.”

Judge Simon Hickey QC sentenced Faulkner to six months in prison, suspended for 12 months. He also ordered him to do 100 hours’ unpaid work and abide by a supervision order.

Judge Hickey said: “You were there to deliberately antagonise the other group, and you offered to sort it out with him if he removed his uniform.”

The court was told Faulkner had 22 convictions, his last back in 2002.

Sunderland Echo
EDLNews

A protester at an English Defence League march in Walsall has been given a suspended jail term and banned from any demonstrations for four years.

Peter Jelley outside Walsall Magistrates Court

Peter Jelley was caught on CCTV gesturing and shouting at a line of police in Walsall as trouble broke out at the rally last autumn. He was sentenced to 20 weeks in custody, suspended by a year, and given a Criminal Anti-Social Behaviour Order at the town’s magistrates court.

The 24-year-old from Shropshire admitted a public order offence of using threatening or abusive behaviour at a previous court hearing and was sentenced yesterday.

The footage from the afternoon of September 29 was played to District Judge Michael Morris and showed Jelley walking up to officers and ‘gesticulating and shouting.’ This was despite the efforts of a female to pull him away.

Mr Paul Nicholas, defending, said: “He has faced up to what he has done, he has faced up to being part of the march. He is shameful of what he has done.”

He insisted his client had disassociated himself from others and had become angry after a relative was hurt. The court was told Jelley has previous convictions for a racially aggravated offence in 2011 and assault the year before.

District Judge Michael Morris said: “You went there knowing what would happen. You were on the frontline facing up to police, clearly agitated and pointing to police.”

Jelley, of Prescott Close, Shrewsbury, was sentenced to five months in custody, suspended for a year.

He was also ordered to do 250 unpaid work and go to an adult attendance centre for 36 hours.

He was also ordered to pay £80 victim surcharge and £85 costs.

Express & Star

KIND-HEARTED pupils have forgiven a recovering alcoholic who threatened and racially abused them inside a secondary school.

Trudie Toker threatened to stab students at St Andrew’s CofE High School in Croydon and told teachers the pupils needed “their black heads bashed in”.

The 33-year-old was drunk when she entered the school grounds in Warrington Road and launched the vicious attack on May 21.

The pupils met with teachers after the verbal assault and were offered support and the chance to discuss their thoughts and feelings.

Instead of feeling angry and upset, the students said they felt sorry for Toker as it was clear she had a drinking problem.

Head teacher David Matthews said he was proud of the school’s students for showing such compassion.

He added: “As a Christian school, we encourage forgiveness as an active force for good.

“Prayer is a natural Christian response to situations that we do not fully understand.

“That some St Andrew’s students have wanted to pray about this woman shows their commitment to a better society where distress and pain are reduced.”

Toker appeared at Croydon Crown Court on March 18 after pleading guilty to using racially threatening words and possession of a bladed article.

The court heard she had also brought out a knife in front of a mother and baby on a bus on February 10 last year.

Defending Toker, Oliver Weetch said his client was trying to give up alcohol and had already managed to quit heroin.

Toker, who lives on the same road as the school, told the Advertiser she shouted the abuse in retaliation after the pupils insulted her.

She also claimed that her neighbour had suffered because of antisocial behaviour from pupils and she was sticking up for her.

While Toker admitted she had a fiery temper, she denied being a racist.

“I have mixed-race people in my family,” she said.

“I retaliated and I shouldn’t have done. I should have known better because I’m older.”

Toker was sentenced to nine months in jail suspended for 18 months, and ordered to complete an alcohol treatment programme.

Judge Daniel Flahive told the defendant she needed psychological help and supervision within the community.

He added: “I was of the view that there was no option but to send you to prison, but I am going to give you a chance.”

This is Croydon

A HERD of llamas starved after being deprived of food on a holding in Yorkshire, a court was told.

Harrogate magistrates heard five of John Shaw’s llamas died, while the other animals were found in an emaciated state in a frozen field on the outskirts of Knaresborough in February, with scant grazing, an empty ring-feeder and dilapidated shelter.

Shaw, 41, of Littondale Avenue, Knaresborough, said he could not afford to feed them.

He pleaded guilty to causing unnecessary suffering leading to death and two counts of not providing a suitable diet and failing to protect the llamas from pain, suffering and disease.

He was jailed for 12 weeks, suspended for a year, and ordered to do 200 hours of unpaid work, with £3,050 costs, and given a 10-year ban on keeping animals.


Yorkshire Post

Dudley council criticises far-right group for going ahead with protest at abandoned development

A member of the English Defence League at a demonstration

A member of the English Defence League at a demonstration. Photograph: Rui Vieira/PA Wire/Press Association Images

The English Defence League’s summer of protests to target Muslim communities is to continue with a demonstration against a “super mosque”, even though the development is no longer going ahead.

The far-right group will return to Dudley next Saturday to demonstrate against the abandoned mosque and community centre project. The council has branded the protest “pointless” and a “waste of taxpayers’ money” as police will be required to ensure safety.

A plea from the council for the organisation to cancel the demonstration came as an EDL protester appeared in court today for putting a pig’s head on the wall of Dudley central mosque.

Anne Millward, leader of the council, said: “The EDL’s unnecessary visits, which often result in major disruption, violence and public disorder, cost the taxpayer and local communities thousands of pounds.

“We are opposed to this proposed event and call on the organisers to cancel this pointless waste of taxpayers’ money.”

But a promotional video by the Bristol division of the EDL said: “The Dudley Muslim Association is determined to force this mosque on the people of Dudley … The EDL will keep coming back until it is scrapped.”

The previous protest against the mosque cost the council over £150,000, damaged local business revenue and resulted in 12 people being arrested.

A council spokesman said: “Council bosses have made it clear that outside extremists can make no contribution to local decisions and reminded the EDL that the plans for a mosque on Hall Street are not currently being pursued.

“The EDL has opposed the former proposal for a mosque but the council has reiterated the fact that the authority and the Dudley Muslim Association have agreed to pursue an alternative site, making the EDL’s visit pointless.”

Margot James, the MP for Stourbridge, near Dudley, wrote to the Home Office asking that police powers be extended to enable them to ban all forms of protest on the grounds of public order when they have a case to do so. She says she is keen to maintain freedom of expression but “a loophole that allows the EDL to call their activity a rally not a march, so as to escape a potential ban, should be closed”.

The league has demonstrated in Newcastle and Bradford but cancelled a planned protest in Tower Hamlets, London, after one of its leaders, Tommy Robinson, told the East London Advertiser it would be a “suicide mission”.

An EDL protester, Kevin Smith, has been given a suspended eight-week prison sentence for putting a pig’s head on the wall of Dudley central mosque in the Castle Hill area of the town on 29 May.

Police believe Smith, 52, of Brierley Hill, was on his way to the Newcastle demonstration when the act took place.He was arrested on 2 June and has been found guilty of religiously aggravated intentional harassment at Dudley magistrates court. Muslims regard pigs as unclean.

Smith was sentenced to eight weeks in prison, suspended for 12 months, and among the conditions imposed was an order that he stay out of the Castle Hill area.

Muslims account for about 2.5% of the population of Dudley. The council says it is exploring the possibility of developing the existing Dudley central mosque as an alternative to the scrapped Hall Street scheme.

Unite Against Fascism has pledged to hold a counter-demonstration next Saturday after protesting against the EDL in April by holding a multi-faith celebration.

The Guardian

A 37-year-old Hull man flew to Canada to meet a teenage girl he had been grooming on the Internet, a court heard.

When Brett Moses arrived in Vancouver, he then took an 11 hour bus journey to meet the 13-year-old in Grand Forks.

He was stopped by Canadian police following concerns by the parents of one of the girl’s friends.

Moses, a security guard in Hull, has now been given a 12-month prison sentence, suspended for two years, after earlier pleading guilty to sexual grooming.

Hull Crown Court heard that he first started speaking to the girl, who cannot be named for legal reasons, on an Internet chat room in 2004.

He claimed to be a 13-year-old called John Smith and initially spoke to the girl’s father.

It was him who introduced Moses to his daughter, having heard claims of “John” being beaten and abused by a foster father.

The correspondence continued for seven or eight months, in which time Moses was introduced online to some of the 13-year-old’s friends.

It was June 2005 when Moses travelled to Canada.

On arrival to Grand Forks, he telephoned the 13-year-old girl, but got no reply.

He then called her friend, whose parents questioned Moses and went to meet him, asking to see identification.

The prosecution said Moses claimed to have lost his ID, saying he was Brian Patterson and that John Smith was his foster son, and had been too ill to travel.

Eventually Moses confessed to the authorities, was detained and deported to the UK, where he was met by British police.

This is Hull