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Derek Phin

Derek Phin

An Aberdeen man who posted a Facebook comment about burning down a mosque in the wake of Lee Rigby’s murder has been jailed.

Derek Phin, 46, admitted posting the threatening and abusive remark about Edinburgh Central Mosque on the social networking site in June last year

British soldier Lee Rigby was attacked and killed in London in May.

At Aberdeen Sheriff Court, Sheriff Annella Cowan jailed Phin for 12 months.

Police had confronted Phin at his home after receiving a tip-off about the comment.

He later stated to officers that he was a member of the Scottish Defence League.

Phin admitted during a previous court appearance posting a threatening and abusive remark with religious prejudice.

Defence agent David Sutherland said: “My client accepts it was unacceptable and inexcusable.”

Sheriff Cowan said: “Justice in this country is measured and considered.

“Everyone in this country is entitled to the same freedoms and protections.

“You have abused what you think is your right to free speech to threaten the safety of innocent people in their place of worship because of your mistaken understanding of what they or their co-religionists stand for.

“Nothing other than a prison sentence is appropriate.”

Earlier this week, Michael Adebolajo was given a whole-life term and Michael Adebowale was jailed for a minimum of 45 years for Lee Rigby’s murder outside Woolwich barracks in south-east London.

They drove a car into Fusilier Rigby at 30-40mph, before dragging him into the road and attacking him with knives and attempting to decapitate him with a meat cleaver.

BBC News

TWO friends obsessed with Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik plotted a far-right hate campaign in Torbay, a court was told today.

John Roddy, 20, and Tobias Ruth, 18, daubed racist graffiti on a mosque and spray painted Brixham police station

bomb

The pair styled themselves as Knights Templar in homage to Breivik and sent letters to Islamic centres telling worshippers to leave the country.

At Exeter Crown Court today Ruth, from Brixham, was sent to a Young Offenders Institution for two years and nine months

He had previously admitted conspiracy to cause criminal damage and to send malicious communications.

Roddy, from Torquay, walked away from court with a suspended jail sentence. He admitted the conspiracy charges and possessing a terror manual on his computer.

Their arrests came in January after an area of Lymington Road in Torquay was sealed off by armed police who feared they may be dealing with a terrorist cell.

Exeter Crown Court was told that police had been hunting whoever was responsible for a series of graffiti attacks on various buildings in Torquay and Brixham dating back to July the previous year.

Red spray paint and the initials KT had been daubed on buildings and 72 incidents of criminal damage were later attributed to the pair.

Among the buildings targeted were Brixham police station; a council-owned building in St Mary’s Park; the Union Street car park in Torquay and a children’s play area in Plainmoor.

Racist slogans were sprayed on the Torquay Islamic Centre.

Police arrested Roddy after a large billboard had been daubed by the words ‘Knights Templar’

Police analysed Facebook traffic between Roddy and Ruth and discovered the pair had been in conversation about places to target.

Roddy’s laptop was found to contain an “al-Qaeda training manual” and Breivik’s ‘2083 A European Declaration of Independence’.

Jeremy Atkinson prosecuting, said: “Both developed an obsession with the personality and ideology of Anders Breivik, the convicted Norwegian terrorist and mass murderer.

“The defendants had attempted to act out to some extent their own form of activity under the banner of Knights Templar, an organisation discussed at some length by Anders Breivik and aspired to be part of that organisation or their own version of it.”

He said in July the pair had taken part in an ‘initiation right’ with each of them branding the other on the upper arm with a hot metal cross to signify their allegiance to the Knights Templar.

Letters sent to the Islamic Centre in Torquay included the words ‘Leave this town today or there will be hell to pay.’

Identical letters, shown to have been addressed by Roddy and using cut out letters from newspapers, were also sent to mosques in Brighton and Plymouth.

Lee Brembridge mitigating for Roddy, now of Old Mill Road,said there was no evidence any of the material found in his possession would be used for terrorist purposes and the material had not been distributed.

He said Roddy was shy and had been assessed by a mental health team. He also had Asperger’s and autism.

Roddy, he said, had come under the influence of Ruth after the pair met on a bricklayer’s course at South Devon College, at which point his family had started to notice a behavioural change.

Kevin Hopper, mitigating for Ruth, said his client was a ‘social inadequate’ who was easily influenced by others. He said Ruth had been 17 at the time and compensation claimed for the graffiti only amounted to £500.

But Judge Francis Gilbert QC said the real cost was far higher and ran into thousands of pounds.

“At least one of the acts of criminal damage was motivated by racial hatred,” he added.

“The racial element of the offences is obvious.”

Roddy was given 23 months in a Young Offenders Institution, suspended for two years and 18 months supervision.

Torquay Herald Express

Adam Rodgers

Adam Rodgers

Adam Rodgers, 28, of Woolwich, a former English Defence League (EDL) activist, threatened to burn down a mosque in retaliation for the brutal killing of soldier Lee Rigby.

Unemployed Rogers was staying with friends in Hastings when he posted a tirade of offensive and obscene remarks on Facebook. He also called on fellow EDL members to congregate at Hastings Mosque in St Leonards.

On Monday (July 15), Rogers was sentenced to 16 weeks in custody, suspended for two years, by Hastings magistrates. He was also given a supervision requirement for 24 months and ordered to pay £85 in costs and an £80 victim surcharge.

May 23rd 2013

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer

The Argus

Matthew Tyson

Matthew Tyson, 23, of Grimsby, was sentenced at Grimsby Magistrates’ Court for posting offensive material about Muslims on an English Defence League Facebook site, Tyson wrote, Grimsby Mosques “want burning down” after soldier Lee Rigby was attacked and killed by two men in Woolwich, on May 22.

The Mosque was attacked days later. Tyson was given a 12-week curfew and must stay in his home between 6am and 8pm, apart from weekends where he must stay at his girlfriend’s home while seeing his children.

His 12-week prison sentence was suspended for six months. The court also ordered the destruction of a laptop and his smart phone.

This Is Grimsby

APOLOGY: Steven Ballard leaving court. The Facebook user claimed the furore caused by his "menacing" comment had cost him his job, girlfriend and his child.

APOLOGY: Steven Ballard leaving court. The Facebook user claimed the furore caused by his “menacing” comment had cost him his job, girlfriend and his child.

Steven Ballard, 27, of Grimsby, admitted sending an offensive or menacing message on May 23 on the Grimsby division EDL fan page on Facebook .

It read: “Burn the mosque down the end of Legsby Avenue. That will tell the clowns in charge in this country that we ain’t taking this s*** and it will start a nationwide action going. “Grimsby will be on the map big time then.”

Ballard was given a 12-week suspended prison sentence, a six-month supervision order and must pay £85 costs and a Government-imposed £80 victims’ surcharge.

This is Grimsby

A man who used his Facebook account to post racist messages has been given community service.

Raymond Strachan, 21, used the social networking site to promote his support of fascist group the Scottish Defence League.

On Tuesday, Edinburgh Sheriff Court heard how Strachan visited various pages on Facebook and left various messages on them in an attempt to stir up racial hatred.

Strachan, from Edinburgh, started posting the messages in July 2011 and continued until he was caught in January this year. Police tracked him down after receiving complaints from other internet users.

The postings, made from his house and other locations in Edinburgh, abused various different racial groups.

Strachan was convicted of breaching the 1986 Public Order Act at a hearing last month.

Sheriff William Holligan him to 200 hours of community service.

Speaking after the case, the procurator fiscal for the East of Scotland, John Logue, welcomed the sentence.

Mr Logue said: “Police and prosecutors across the country take such offences extremely seriously. I hope this case sends a warning to those who think that offences committed on the internet are in some way immune from the reach of the law.

“Prejudice and hatred has no place in Scotland and we will continue to do all in our powers to eradicate it.”

STV