Archive

community order

Salvatore Allegro - James Whitbread

Salvatore Allegro, 48, and James Whitbread, 36, were both found guilty of a racially aggravated public order offence for beating up a Muslim at a tube station.

The men verbally abused Ahmed Farhan, telling him to “go back to your own country you f***ing Muslim c**t.”.

When Farhan got off the train at Bank station the two men followed him, shouting anti-Muslim abuse before punching him repeatedly. Both men were given a six month prison sentence, suspended for 18 months.

They were also both banned from engaging in any EDL activities, meetings or protests for 18 months.

Allegro was made to carry out 120 hours unpaid work while Whitbread was given an 18 month supervision requirement..The duo must each pay Mr Farhan £100 compensation as well as prosecution costs of £150.

IEngage

AN anti-mosque protester avoided jail after he was found to be carrying cocaine following a street demonstration.

Warren Faulkner also offered to “sort out” his differences with a police officer when they clashed during the protest in Millfield, Sunderland.

Newcastle Crown Court was told Faulkner was among a group demonstrating about plans to build a mosque in St Marks Road.

The 42-year-old, of Webb Avenue, Westlea, Seaham, was then spotted by an officer in a back lane shouting “come on, come on, bring it on”.

The court heard Faulkner tried to trip up the officer, who was separating the right-wing demonstrators from the anti-fascist group. As he was being detained, Webb told the officer: “I will give you my phone number, and we can sort this out without your uniform on”.

Prosecutor Michael Bunch said: “Following this, a small packet of cocaine was found in his trouser pocket, with a street value of £34.”

Faulkner, who had pleaded guilty at an earlier hearing to possession of a controlled substance with intent to supply, and a public order offence, claimed he was only carrying the drug after someone asked him to keep it for them.

Vic Laffey, defending, said Faulkner had lost his job as a result of being brought before the court.

He said: “This was a straightforward agreement with the friend to keep the drugs, with no suggestion at all that he would make money or a profit from them. He intended to give the drugs back.”

Judge Simon Hickey QC sentenced Faulkner to six months in prison, suspended for 12 months. He also ordered him to do 100 hours’ unpaid work and abide by a supervision order.

Judge Hickey said: “You were there to deliberately antagonise the other group, and you offered to sort it out with him if he removed his uniform.”

The court was told Faulkner had 22 convictions, his last back in 2002.

Sunderland Echo
EDLNews

Jack Beasley

An English Defence League supporter who shouted abuse and used threatening behaviour during a demonstration in Walsall – has been handed a criminal anti-social behaviour order after narrowly avoiding a jail term due to health problems.

Jack Beasley travelled from Durham to take part in the protest which brought Walsall town centre to a standstill on September 29 last year, Walsall Magistrates Court heard yesterday.

Trouble flared, in Leicester Street, during the rally.

Miss Jo Taylor, prosecuting, said: “By the time the afternoon approached things were clearly getting out of hand.”

She said Beasley had been wearing a black EDL top and was identified on CCTV raising his arms and chanting.

She said other people around him were throwing ‘missiles’ at police and Beasley looked as though he had picked up some items and was making a throwing action in various photos.

He denied throwing any objects.

Miss Taylor told the court: “As you can see from some photos, he is on the frontline behaving in an aggressive manner, chanting at police.”

Beasley, aged 23, of Cedar Road, Bishop Auckland, initially denied using threatening words or behaviour with the intent to cause fear or provoke unlawful violence.

But he changed his plea to guilty on the day of his trial.

Sentencing Beasley, District Judge Michael Morris said: “It is clear you have hatred for certain members of the community. Whether you are going to change your ways or not, I do not know.

“You were picking up items which could be used to throw at police or demonstrators.”

He said the offence would usual carry a prison sentence but was prepared to suspend the jail term because Beasley had health problems.

Beasley was sentenced to 12 weeks in jail, suspended for 12 months, and was handed a community order with a supervision requirement.

He was ordered to carry out 100 hours unpaid work, pay £250 costs and was handed a three-year criminal anti-social behaviour order which forbids him from attending any rally by the EDL or Unite Against Fascism.

It also prevents him from displaying any banner or placard with writing or a logo which is likely to cause harassment, alarm or distress to any other person.

A number of protesters and police officers were treated for minor cuts and bruises after angry scenes unfolded last September.

Express and Star

The founder of the English Defence League has lost an appeal against his conviction for leading a brawl involving 100 football fans.

Stephen Lennon, 28, led Luton Town supporters as they clashed with Newport County fans in Luton, the town’s crown court heard.

Lennon, from Luton, was convicted in July of using threatening, abusive or insulting behaviour in August 2010.

His claim that he was not in the group was dismissed by a High Court judge.

A confrontation began ahead of the evening game on 24 August when Newport supporters made a mass exodus from the Bedfordshire Yeoman pub just as 50 Luton fans approached.

The trouble involved chanting, missiles being thrown, assaults and damage to property, the court heard.

Lennon was at the front of the group, with others looking to him for leadership, and it is alleged he was chanting “E …E…EDL” the court was told.

‘Confusing scene’

Lennon told Mr Justice Saunders: “I was not with the group. There was a lot of shouting and screaming and some fighting but it looked more like ‘handbags’ to me.”

He claimed it had all been about England and Wales and that, while he may have made “sheep” insults, he had never mentioned EDL.

“It is ridiculous to suggest that, it is just not relevant.”

In dismissing the appeal Mr Justice Saunders said: “It must have been a very confusing scene and we are not making any detailed finding on exactly what happened and whether he was the leader of the group or not.

“We are not saying whether he was shouting about the EDL but on his own admission he was shouting something which was intended to be insulting to the Welsh and he was waving his arms about.

“It is impossible to accept any other intention than to provoke them into fighting.

“It must have been a frightening scene for anyone to observe.”

Luton magistrates had sentenced Lennon to a 12-month community rehabilitation order, a three-year ban from football and ordered him to carry out 150 hours of unpaid work.

Lennon is due to be sentenced in November for an assault on an EDL member at Blackburn, Lancashire, in April.

BBC News

AN AIRBUS security check on a worker’s computer revealed indecent images of children and sparked a police investigation.

When police probed the emails of Broughton factory employee Matthew Woodward they discovered he had received an email from someone claiming to be a 13-year-old girl looking to exchange ‘naughty pictures’.

Woodward, 22, formerly of Cable Street in Connah’s Quay, pleaded guilty at Mold Crown Court to 16 offences.

Judge Niclas Parry imposed a three-year community order and sent him on a sexual offending treatment programme.

Woodward must complete 120 hours of unpaid work and will remain on the Sex Offenders Register for five years.

He is also banned from working with children.

David Mainstone, prosecuting, said that in September 2011 Airbus did a check of the defendant’s computer and as a result his offending came to light.

Police then seized Woodward’s personal laptop and further images of children were found.

Andrew Green, defending, said Woodward’s life had ‘fallen apart’ because of what he had done.

The defendant had lost his job and moved to Derby, the court was told.

Daily Post

AN anti-paedophile campaigner has been jailed for throwing punches and kicks in a violent clash between football supporters in the city centre.

Christopher Wittwer was one of seven men sentenced at Exeter Crown Court yesterday after the group of hooligans went after Huddersfield Town supporters in May last year.

Wittwer, who set up a controversial anti-paedophile website naming convicted child sex offenders last summer, was jailed for 10 months.

Violence flared while the High Street was full of shoppers, including parents who had to shield their toddler in a push chair.

Wittwer, 35, of Oakmead, Aylesbeare; Darren Bolt, 24, of Salisbury Road, Exmouth; Neil Vooght, 35, of Hazelwood Park, Dawlish, and Neil Cartwright, 37, of Lapwing Close, Cullompton, all admitted affray.

Bolt, Vooght and Cartwright were also jailed for 10 months but the term was suspended for two years.

They were ordered to carry out 220 hours of unpaid work each.

Brendan Daniel, 24, of Leypark Road, Exeter; Mark Langdon, 20, of Austin Close, Exeter, and Joseph Foxworthy, 25, of Old Vicarage Road, Exeter, admitted public order offences. They were due to be given community orders with unpaid work.

Prosecutor Richard Crabb told the court the group were “looking for a violent confrontation” on May 8, last year, the day of a home game between Exeter City and Huddersfield Town.

He said a group of Huddersfield fans had been having a “quiet drink” in The Ship Inn, but most had left.

At 2pm, a group of 25 Exeter supporters gathered outside the pub shouting and swearing.

Some went inside but on realising the rivals had left walked up the High Street where they found a group of four Huddersfield fans.

Wittwer and Vooght were aiming punches and kicks at the rivals. They also chased them down the road. Bolt was seen throwing punches and Cartwright kicking out.

Mr Crabb said: “Members of the public were moving out of the way and some were protecting a toddler in a push chair.”

When police arrived the group fled but these defendants were identified.

Mr Crabb said the violence was “nipped in the bud by the prompt arrival of police” but had the potential to be much worse. The incident was clearly caught on CCTV.

Wittwer previously received a banning order for three years for threatening an Aldershot Town supporter in Sidwell Street, in 2004. He breached the order twice and was also convicted of an affray in a nightclub, in 2007.

The court was told that Vooght, Bolt and Daniel had no previous convictions.

Cartwright and Foxworthy both have two dissimilar previous convictions and Langdon has two public order offences on his record, from 2009.

Stephen Nunn, mitigating for Wittwer, said he admitted his guilt straight away and wanted to be sentenced back in February. He told the court that Wittwer, who has an ex-wife and child who live abroad, rarely goes out now and has not offended since the incident.

He conceded that he “had the disadvantage of having two things on his record that put him in a difficult situation.”

Mitigating for Vooght, Nigel Wraith said the offence was “completely out of character”.

For Bolt, Cartwright, Daniel, Foxworthy and Langdon, Kevin Hopper said they should get credit for their guilty pleas.

Judge Phillip Wassall told Wittwer he had a “dreadful record for football-related violence.”

They were all given football banning orders preventing them from attending games for six years.

This is Plymouth

John Walsh, 25, shouted abuse at a member of the mosque on Liverpool Road in Eccles before kicking at the door.
John Walsh, 25, shouted abuse at a member of the mosque on Liverpool Road in Eccles before kicking at the door.

A drunken yob who threatened to burn down a mosque has escaped jail ‘by a whisker’.

John Walsh, 25, shouted abuse at a member of the mosque on Liverpool Road in Eccles before kicking at the door.

Walsh – a plant vehicle operator from Boardman Street, Eccles – then turned on a nearby shop manager.

He was given a community penalty and warned he would face prison if he committed a similar offence in the next two years.

Walsh admitted two counts of racially aggravated public disorder when he appeared at Manchester Minshull Street Crown Court.

The court heard how a member of the mosque had been locking up after prayers when he heard Walsh shouting from across the street.

Patrick Buckley, prosecuting, said Walsh had shouted words to the effect that he was going to ‘burn down’ the mosque.

Walsh then kicked and pushed at the locked door before going into a nearby shop and racially abusing the manager.

He returned to the shop later and began shouting football songs, but a police officer was inside and he was arrested.

He said later he was ‘really sorry’.

John McDiarmid, defending, said Walsh was from a respectable family, but drank heavily at weekends while watching football with friends.

Remorse

He said he had no recollection of the offences, but had shown remorse.

Mr McDiarmid said: “This young man has a genuine willingness to change.”

Judge Bernard Lever, sentencing, gave Walsh a two-year community order with six months’ supervision.

He ordered him to carry out 150 hours of unpaid work and placed him under a curfew.

Judge Lever said prison would not help Walsh’s problems and added: “I’ve only been persuaded by a whisker to take this other course.

“You have had a very narrow escape.

“Be warned. Go home to your respectable family. Don’t drink too much and respect other people as they would respect you.

“I don’t want to see you again but, if I do, it will be for an inevitable custodial sentence.”

Manchester Evening News

A man who used his Facebook account to post racist messages has been given community service.

Raymond Strachan, 21, used the social networking site to promote his support of fascist group the Scottish Defence League.

On Tuesday, Edinburgh Sheriff Court heard how Strachan visited various pages on Facebook and left various messages on them in an attempt to stir up racial hatred.

Strachan, from Edinburgh, started posting the messages in July 2011 and continued until he was caught in January this year. Police tracked him down after receiving complaints from other internet users.

The postings, made from his house and other locations in Edinburgh, abused various different racial groups.

Strachan was convicted of breaching the 1986 Public Order Act at a hearing last month.

Sheriff William Holligan him to 200 hours of community service.

Speaking after the case, the procurator fiscal for the East of Scotland, John Logue, welcomed the sentence.

Mr Logue said: “Police and prosecutors across the country take such offences extremely seriously. I hope this case sends a warning to those who think that offences committed on the internet are in some way immune from the reach of the law.

“Prejudice and hatred has no place in Scotland and we will continue to do all in our powers to eradicate it.”

STV

Richard Price, co-ordinator of the West Midlands division of the EDL Richard Price, co-Co-ordinator of the West Midlands division of the EDL

A leader of the English Defence League who was described as a “political prisoner” after being jailed for violence at a march had already been placed on the sex offenders register for downloading indecent images of children, The Times can reveal.

The far-right group launched a campaign to free Richard Price, co-ordinator of the West Midlands division of the EDL, after he was jailed last month for violent behaviour. But Price, 41, had been convicted in June 2010 of making four indecent images of children, and possessing cocaine and crack cocaine.

That conviction followed an earlier arrest in 2009 for public order offences believed to have been connected with EDL marches. Police were understood to have seized and analysed his computer, leading to the discovery of sexual images of children that he had downloaded. His home was also searched and the drugs were found.

Price admitted four counts of making indecent images of children and two charges of possessing cocaine when he appeared at Birmingham Crown Court. He was banned from owning a computer for a year, given a three-year community supervision order and ordered to sign on to the sex offenders register for five years.

Price, from Quinton, Birmingham, and Collum Keyes, 23, also from Birmingham, were among 12 people arrested when they surged through police lines during a protest in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, in May 2010.

When that case came to court in December, Price admitted using threatening behaviour. He was jailed for three months and given a ten-year Criminal Anti-Social Behaviour Order banning him from attending marches outside Birmingham. Keyes, who admitted disorderly conduct, was fined £150.

When Price was jailed, EDL members launched a campaign urging supporters to write to the Prime Minister and MPs to try to “win justice for Richard Price, EDL”.

The Aston Villa supporter, who has also been linked to football hooliganism, was even likened by his supporters to a modern-day John Bunyan, the Puritan Christian preacher and author of Pilgrim’s Progress who was jailed for continuing his sermons without the permission of the established Church in the 1600s.

But today’s revelation that one of the EDL’s leading members has been convicted of sex offences will come as a huge embarrassment to a group that has struggled to shrug off its reputation as a new version of the National Front.

In recent months, particularly following the political demise of the British National Party, the EDL has begun to attract more support. Its leader, who had previously used the alias Tommy Robinson, was traced by The Times and gave his first interview using his real name.

Stephen Lennon has vehemently denied that the group he started in Luton, Bedfordshire, is racist, saying that it has even set up a gay and lesbian division and given a prominent role to a Sikh supporter opposed to Islamic extremists.

Supporters of the EDL had claimed that Price became a political prisoner after he, along with Keyes, was banned from organising, controlling or travelling to any open-air protest outside Birmingham for ten years.

It was the first time a Criminal Anti-Social Behaviour Order, sought by Thames Valley Police in conjunction with the National Domestic Extremism Unit, had been issued to a demonstrator connected to the EDL.

Last month, a database of EDL supporters was published on the internet. Hackers had attacked the group’s database of those who had made donations to the EDL and people who had bought clothing from its merchandise wing.

The Times

Daily Star

 

hylandandsilvesterHyland (left) and Silvester: racist EDL thugs

Two members of the far-right English Defence League have found themselves up in Portsmouth Courts in the same week for racially-aggravated harassment and breach of bail conditions for violent assault

Jacob ‘Jake’ Hyland is one of the more active and extreme fascist members of Portsmouth EDL and the hilariously entitled ‘Pompey EDL Youth Division’. He has even been on the Portsmouth Anarchist blog under the name ‘pompeyagainstanarchists’ arguing that the EDL are not racist. The 18-year-old, of Mayridge, Fareham, been given a restraining order by Portsmouth Crown Court (15/11/11) for religiously-aggravated harassment after making abusive phone calls to Abbas Rahim at the Al Mahdi Centre in Fareham in October and November of last year.

Following the court appearance of baby-faced Nazi Jacob ‘Jake’ Hyland earlier in the week, a second Portsmouth member of the extremist EDL also had his day in court (or should that be YET another day in court, following his previous convictions?!) .

Blaise Silvester, 21, of Stubbington Avenue, North End, was given a two-month curfew and told to do 100 hours of unpaid work after attacking peace protesters at a demonstration outside the Jami Mosque in Victoria Road North, Southsea. A group of football hooligans, neo-nazi extremists and local youths formed to hurl racist abuse, bottles, bricks, fireworks and roofing slates at members of the peaceful Portsmouth muslim community and many others from the local area who had gathered to defend the Mosque.

Sentencing him in June, Judge Graham White said the 21-year-old could normally have gone to jail. But a mistake by the probation service meant the judge’s hands were tied and he had to hand Silvester a community order. Silvester was given a 12-month community order and told to do 100 hours of unpaid work in the community. He also had to wear an electronic tag and stay at home everyday from 9pm to 6am for two months. Silvester should have been offered rehabilitation by the probation service for a previous offence but because he wasn’t, the judge said he couldn’t jail him.

Rather than counting himself lucky and getting on with the unpaid work, Silvester breached the order. On one occasion he shouted and swore at the officer in charge and another time he failed to turn up, Portsmouth Crown Court heard.

Lancaster Unity
And Paulie @ Indymedia