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Kane Powell admitted assaulting his victim and shouting racial abuse

A Redruth man has admitted assaulting a victim of Pakistani origin and behaving in a threatening and racially aggravated manner.

Kane Powell, of Higher Fore Street, appeared at Truro Crown Court on Friday (November 16) for a plea hearing.

Powell, 20, pleaded guilty to two counts of assault, and another of causing racially aggravated fear/provocation of violence. He also admitted to being in possession of a lock knife in a public place.

The court heard that Powell assaulted his victim, Mohammed Shah, in Redruth on March 1.

Philip Lee, for the prosecution, told the court that the racially aggravated element of the offence came as a result of Powell approaching the door of a residential property belonging to Sultan Ahmed and repeatedly banging and kicking the door, while shouting racial abuse.

Judge James Townsend told Powell that he will be sentenced at Truro Crown Court on Tuesday (November 20).

Judge Townsend asked for a pre-sentence report to be prepared by the probation service to enable Tuesday’s sitting judge to understand the background behind Powell’s crimes.

In the meantime Powell was granted unconditional bail.

Cornwall Live

A MUSSELBURGH shopkeeper was kicked in the face and repeatedly punched in a racist attack at his store.

Craig Douglas launched the savage attack on Ilhan Ahmedov outside the man’s newsagents store on the town’s Eskview Terrace earlier this year.

Douglas appeared at the small family-run shop with another man after consuming alcohol and taking Valium and began hurling racist abuse at Mr Ahmedov.

Douglas, 24, asked the shopkeeper for alcohol but when told the shop did not have a licence he shouted racist slurs.

He was heard shouting: “We are Scottish – who are you?” at the stunned shop owner.

Both men were then asked to leave the premises and Mr Ahmedov pressed the shop’s panic alarm before managing to usher both men from the store.

But once outside, Douglas repeatedly punched the shop owner as he was “cowering in the doorway” of the shop.

Mr Ahmedov was viciously kicked to the face before being punched again and it took a passing motorist to pull over and intervene for the attack to stop.

Mr Ahmedov was taken to Edinburgh Royal Infirmary following the attack, where it was found he had suffered a broken cheekbone and nose, as well as cuts and bruises to his face.

Both men had run from the scene and police were called in to search for them.

Douglas was then apprehended and he pleaded guilty to the attack when he appeared in the dock from custody at Edinburgh Sheriff Court last Thursday.

The court was told the attack took place at about 8pm on August 10 and that Douglas, a labourer with a local building firm, had taken an excess of alcohol and Valium beforehand.

Solicitor Colm Dempsey, defending, said his client suffered from “substance abuse” and was due to become a father for the first time in February.

Mr Dempsey said that Douglas’s partner had “felt very let down” by his violent actions but that he had “accepted full responsibility” for the offence, despite having “no real recollection of events”.

The solicitor also informed the court that Douglas had been on a supervised release order at the time of the attack from a previous incident.

Sheriff Nigel Ross told Douglas: “We have been here before. There is no alternative to custody as this was a violent assault on a shopkeeper who was going about his business.”

Sheriff Ross jailed Douglas for 18 months.

Douglas pleaded guilty to assaulting Ilhan Ahmedov by repeatedly punching him on the head and body and to kicking him to the head, all to his severe injury, at Monktonhall Newsagents, Eskview Terrace, Musselburgh, on August 10.

East Lothian Courier

A THUG hurled racist abuse at staff at a bar in Leeds before using a hammer to smash windows at the premises.

John Lock caused more than £1,000 worth of damage during the incident at the Dahlak entertainment centre on Stoney Rock Lane, Burmantofts.

Leeds Crown Court heard Lock, 28, went into the premises, formerly the Sportsman pub, on March 29 this year but staff refused to serve him as he had previously been barred.

Andrew Horton, prosecuting, said Lock then took out a bottle of whisky which he had brought with him and began drinking from it.

Lock became aggressive and refused to leave.

The staff member then fetched his boss who ejected Lock from the premises.

Lock shouted racial abuse at the men and said: “You will see me again.”

He returned carrying a hammer and used it to smash windows.

The prosecutor said “glass was flying everywhere” and some of it hit a member of staff in the face.

Children witnessed the incident as they made their way home from a nearby primary school

Police arrested Lock at his home later that day and he was in possession of two hammers and a half-empty bottle of whisky.

The court heard Lock breached a restraining order by contacting his partner on Facebook on May 30.

He also assaulted a police officer who went to his home on October 5 this year.

The court heard officers went to his home and saw Lock’s feet sticking out of a cupboard.

He was told to come out but ran into one of the officers as he tried to get away from them.

The officer fell down some stairs.

Lock, of Shakespeare Lawn, Burmantofts, pleaded guilty to racially aggravated criminal damage, racially aggravated threatening behaviour, breaching a restraining order and assaulting a police constable in the execution of his duty.

Ian Cook, mitigating, said Lock was sorry for the offences and was “disappointed” with himself for shouting racial abuse.

Mr Cook added: “He does not consider himself to be a racist man. He said racist things in the heat of the moment while clearly in drink.”

Lock was jailed for eight months.
Yorkshire Evening Post

John Reilly called Esmael Elmarghani a “Muslim b*****d” when he wasn’t even a Muslim

John Reilly, 41, of no fixed address, admitted racially aggravated assault causing actual bodily harm

John Reilly, 41, of no fixed address, admitted racially aggravated assault causing actual bodily harm

A prisoner poured boiling water in a sleeping inmate’s eye at HMP Altcourse during a sickening racist attack.

Convicted robber John Reilly demanded a turn on a pool table when Esmael Elmarghani was playing a game.

Liverpool Crown Court heard Elmarghani, 38, originally from Libya, didn’t want any trouble and said ‘that’s fine”.

To ensure there were no hard feelings, he offered Reilly a fist bump, which the 41-year-old reciprocated.

But when he went back to his cell and fell asleep, Reilly collected boiling water from a tea urn in a beaker.

The cowardly thug then crept up to defenceless Elmarghani and emptied its contents onto his left eye.

He woke in immense pain and Reilly warned: “Don’t go out you Muslim b*****d – if you go out I will kill you.”

Derek Jones, prosecuting, said Elmarghani – who is not actually Muslim – was terrified but alerted prison guards.

He had been in the jail since early last year and had “kept himself to himself” before the June 17, 2017 incident.

CCTV footage captured Reilly hiding the beaker, going in Elmarghani’s cell, onto the landing, then back in the cell to attack.

Mr Jones said the victim was taken to Whiston hospital, where he received treatment including ointment for three days.

Reilly, of no fixed address, appearing via video link from HMP Birmingham, admitted racially aggravated assault causing actual bodily harm.

Judge Gary Woodhall questioned why he was not charged with causing grievous bodily harm, which Mr Jones said surprised him.

Elmarghani revealed he no longer had any scarring on his face, but is receiving treatment for his left eye from ophthalmologists.

The victim said he had suffered depression since the incident and was nervous of people coming close to him.

He said he was afraid of people holding bottles of water and found going out in public and getting a new job difficult.

Because of the damage to his skin, he said he avoided sunlight or direct heat and no longer felt able to work as a chef.

Mr Jones said: “He describes having partial vision and his ongoing course of treatment involves having injections to his left eyeball.

“He is still unsure if the damage to the eye will be permanent or not.”

Reilly, who refused to be interviewed when police attended prison, has 42 previous convictions for 142 offences, dating back to 1992.

They include wounding, assaults, drugs, possession of weapons, affrays and a robbery he was jailed for five years over in 1998.

He was locked up for five years, four months with an extended two years, eight months on licence in September 2015 for robbery.

And just nine days after this attack, he assaulted a prison guard by punching him in the face and was convicted of battery.

Charles Lander, defending, said his client – who was due for release next March – was “embarrassed and ashamed”.

He said: “The defendant says after a game of pool his head was stewing, he was going to get a coffee and for some reason he just went into that room and acted as he did.”

Mr Lander said Reilly had anger management issues and was possibly schizophrenic but at the time was not receiving his medication.

He said he was embarrassed to now have a conviction for racism and never had any problems before with Muslims or ethnic minorities.

Judge Woodhall said Reilly “muscled in” on the game of pool and Elmarghani didn’t argue back, but then suffered a “very painful” injury.

He said: “It fact Mr Elmarghani is not a Muslim but you clearly believed he was and that was the motivation, at least in part, for this unprovoked attack.”

The judge handed Reilly two years and eight months in prison – consecutive to his existing sentence – meaning he will not be released before July 2020.
Liverpool Echo

‘They wanted to beat me up … All three of them hit me, kicks and punches, and when I was on the floor there were more kicks and punches’, Dario Antonioni tells court

A trio of drunken racists attacked an Italian barman and told him to “go back to your own country” because they incorrectly assumed he was Muslim, a court has heard.

Shouting “f***ing Muslim” and “Muslim go home” Joshua O’Leary, 23, and Alfred Young, 19, set upon Dario Antonioni in the in Surrey Quays area of east London on 10 June.

He told Inner London crown court that he that he had a beard at the time.

“Due to your prejudice and ignorance and because he had a small beard you all thought he was a Muslim and shouted abuse at him,” Judge Benedict Kelleher said as he sentenced the pair to community service and curfew instead of jail, the Evening Standard reported. “He put up a spirited defence to your completely unjustified attack late at night while under the influence of alcohol.”

He added that a third man, who was not caught, appeared to be the leader in the attack.

Mr Antonioni said he started walking quickly to get away and began to run when a bottle was thrown at him after he exited the Canada Water tube station.

He said: “The three of them surrounded me. I fell to the ground and I was struck everywhere by all three of them. I said: ‘What are you doing? Why are you doing this?’ and I was speaking to them in Italian, but they increased the shouting. They wanted to beat me up … All three of them hit me, kicks and punches, and when I was on the floor there were more kicks and punches.”

He escaped with bruises on his elbows and knees and grazes on his face.

O’Leary denied taking part in the attack but was found guilty by a jury of religiously aggravated assault. He was sentenced to a 12-month community order, 180 hours of community services, 20 days rehabilitation and a night-time curfew for 12 weeks.

Young admitted to the same charge and was handed a 12-month community order with 80 hours community service and a six-week night-time curfew.

They were both ordered to pay compensation to the victim.

The Independent

After members of the neo-Nazi group National Action are jailed we look back at the racist member of right wing groups who was convicted of terrorism in Grimsby

He claimed to be a peaceful right wing activist in Grimsby who wanted to stand up for Britain’s “indigenous” people.

But loner Nathan Worrell was the secret neo-Nazi in Cromwell Street, a twisted racist who was trying to build bombs in his kitchen, inspired by a notorious nail bombing killer.

Even 10-years later, the trial of Worrell remains one of the most dramatic and truly horrifying cases that has been heard at Grimsby Crown Court.

And following the jailing of a cell of neo-Nazis and white supremacists last week for terrorism offences – including a couple who named their son Adolf – the similarities to the Worrell case are stark.

Both cases shone a light into the lives of right wing extremists and why anti-terrorism investigators now believe they hold as much of a threat as Islamist terrorist groups like ISIS.

At first, Worrell’s activities appeared to be limited to a vile campaign targeting a mixed race couple in the Willows Estate.

Officers were alerted after Worrell plastered stickers outside the home of a mother-of-one – branding her a “race-mixing slut”.

Flat full of Nazi literature

He focused his hate campaign on her and her husband, who was Bangladeshi born, and put stickers on the couple’s rear gate and on a lamp post near their home, reading: “Only inferior white women date outside their race. Be proud of your heritage. Don’t be a race-mixing slut.”

But, when police visited his flat in Cromwell Street, a much more worrying picture emerged that was to lead to a full blown terrorism investigation.

At first Worrell refused to let officers into his home but they forced their way in.

Inside, they discovered stacks of racist and neo-Nazi material, including five different types of sticker which had appeared outside the couple’s home in the Willows Estate.

Nathan Worrell was a member of a number of right-wing neo-Nazi groups and had expressed support for Soho killer David Copeland in items seized from his flat in Cromwell Road

Nathan Worrell was a member of a number of right-wing neo-Nazi groups and had expressed support for Soho killer David Copeland in items seized from his flat in Cromwell Road

But it was only then that the true horrific nature of what Worrell was doing became apparent.

There were numerous bomb-making manuals and the raw ingredients to make explosive devices. These included instructions on how to make detonators and what ingredients were needed for bombs.

He had bought fireworks and dozens of boxes of matches. What appeared to be an amateur attempt to make explosives actually used similar methods as neo-Nazi David Copeland, a right wing extremist who killed three people, including a pregnant woman, in a series of nail bomb attacks in London in 1999.

In fact among hundreds of Nazi pamphlets, leaflets, stickers and books was one with a chilling reference to the Soho killer. ‘Stand by Dave Copeland’, it said. ‘Leaderless resistance works. Combat 18 in the area!’

Shortly before Worrell’s arrest, the High Court in London ruled that Copeland should remain in prison for at least 50 years, ruling out his release until 2049 at the earliest, when he would be 73.

Worrell’s hoard of far-right material also included references to Adolf Hitler, the Nazi Party and the Ku Klux Klan. Extremist groups represented included Combat 18, with the 18 derived from Adolf Hitler’s initials. Other leaflets and flyers mentioned ‘Cleethorpes Combat 18’.

It was later discovered Worrell had also been a member of right-wing groups, the White Nationalist Party, the British People’s Party, the National Front, the Ku Klux Klan and the British National Party. Like Copeland, a fascination with Nazi and right wing ideology had progressed to actively becoming involved with the groups and then researching home made explosive devices and detonators.

Experts told the trial Worrell’s experiments included dismantling the fireworks in a way which could be used to build explosive devices and police suspected he had been starting to assemble a crude pipe bomb in a coffee jar when he was caught.

During the trial, Worrell denied possessing articles for terrorism purposes, including documents for making explosives and incendiary devices, 171 match heads, a large quantity of matches, several tubs of sodium chlorate, fireworks containing black powder, and containers of lighter fluid.

He also denied a racially aggravated public order offence by displaying racist stickers with intent to cause the mixed-race couple harassment, alarm or distress.

The court heard that he held “far-right political views”. When interviewed by police, he described himself as a white nationalist. He said he believed that this country belonged exclusively to white people – and that he was fighting for this country in a peaceful manner.

References to nail bomber David Copeland were found in Nathan Worrell's flat in Grimsby

References to nail bomber David Copeland were found in Nathan Worrell’s flat in Grimsby

But the prosecution claimed: “He was not merely a peaceful right-wing activist. He had more sinister, violent intentions.

“The very nature of the sticker campaign shows this defendant was not merely a collector of extreme right-wing items, but was active in taking steps to promote his ideology.

“He was plainly targeting ethnic minorities as part of his extreme right-wing views,” the prosecution claimed.

Heil Hitler texts

He had far-right political pamphlets and books – much of it Nazi – in his flat and he signed off text messages with “88”, a code for Heil Hitler. “He is undoubtedly a racist who follows the political views of the National Socialist or Nazi Party,” said the prosecution.

There were books giving two recipes for ‘how to make explosives’ and information on how to buy ordinary products which could be used. He had a large number of fireworks, some of which had been tampered with in order to remove the gun powder.

Other books in Worrell’s bedroom covered subjects including murder, contract killers and hit men, arson as a means of attack, guerrilla warfare, leaderless resistance and more references to nail bomber Copeland.

Worrell sent racist text messages to a friend in reaction to watching two television programmes, Crimewatch, and a documentary featuring David Baddiel about compensation owed to the Jewish Community following the Second World War.

He also had a Death’s Head as the wallpaper on one of his three mobile phones. He told police he supported Combat 18 “in terms of some of their policies”, but did not believe in taking violent action. He denied ever specifically ordering material from Combat 18. Some stickers he had, but claimed not to have ordered, referred to a “Cleethorpes Combat 18”.

He admitted distributing stickers for far-right political groups, sticking them on lamp posts and junction boxes around Grimsby. When asked what he thought the effect of such stickers would be on any minority groups living in the area, he said: “I don’t know. I don’t associate with them.”

One text included an image of Adolf Hitler with a halo round him and another attacked the country’s immigration policies and called Britain a “cesspit for scum”.

Just a sad loner, claimed defence

The defence portrayed Worrell as a “slightly sad loner” who had long standing far-right wing beliefs but could not even drive or afford to go to rallies and meetings.

They claimed his activism was limited to “leafleting” and denied there was any bomb plot.

Grimsby Crown Court heard Nathan Worrell had been trying to assemble bombs using gunpowder from fireworks, pictured here, and chemicals in the same way as Soho nail bomber David Copeland

Grimsby Crown Court heard Nathan Worrell had been trying to assemble bombs using gunpowder from fireworks, pictured here, and chemicals in the same way as Soho nail bomber David Copeland

“He is not a terrorist,” claimed the defence, which branded the prosecution case “completely over the top” and accused it of throwing“ everything, including the kitchen sink” at the case.

Worrell did not give evidence at his trial and in January 2008 he was convicted by the jury in less than four hours.

He was jailed for seven years and three months. It included six years for the terrorist offence, with a consecutive 15 months for the racist public order offence.

Judge John Reddihough told Worrell: “Perhaps the least I say about the extreme views you hold and the way we saw you express them in the documents and other items before the court, the better.

“Maybe the citizens of this country are entitled to hold such views but what they are not entitled to do is embark on criminal offences in furtherance of those extreme views.”

He told Worrell: “You were in possession of a large number of instruction manuals for making explosive and other devices that could be used to harm innocent people.

“You were in possession of other items which appeared to advocate the use of violence to promote the extreme right-wing views you held.

“Courts in this country must make it clear that terrorism, in any form, will not be tolerated.

“Any offence which involves any step towards terrorist acts must be firmly punished.”

Right win extremist Nathan Worrell who was convicted of terrorism offences in Grimsby

Right win extremist Nathan Worrell who was convicted of terrorism offences in Grimsby

After the case, it emerged that Worrell was born in Cleethorpes and grew up in Grimsby with his mother and sister. The last school he attended was Havelock School, Grimsby, and he was believed to have worked for a warehouse in the town as a packer. He also had a job picking cabbages.

At the time of his arrest, he was unemployed and was not believed to have held any long-term employment since leaving school.

After the sentencing, the husband targeted by Worrell’s racist leaflets said: “It is not long enough. He will be out in three or four years. He will probably come out and still hold the same racist beliefs.”

Worrell appealed against his sentence which was rejected.

It is thought Worrell was released in 2011 and his whereabouts are currently unknown.

Grimsby Telegraph

A man with “issues” with God and religion who started fires at two places of worship in Edinburgh within minutes of each other has been jailed for four years.

Paul Johnson, 49, told police after he was arrested for the fires at a Methodist church and a Sikh temple that he had wanted to watch them burn down.

Johnson claimed that he was wanting to make “a political statement” but would not elaborate on the details.

Advocate depute Alan Cameron said: “When asked whether this was religiously motivated he stated that he has no issue with any particular religion but his issues are with religion and God in general.”

On Thursday, Johnson – who pleaded guilty to two charges last month, was sent to prison.

Passing sentence, Lord Boyd told Johnson that he had no other option but to impose a custodial term on him..

He added: “Your actions put people at risk. They were reckless and wicked. I take into account that your actions were motivated by a grudge against religion and religious authority and not against one particular religion.

“Indeed, I take into account that you appeared not to know what denominations you targeted.”

Johnson admitted two charges of wilful fire raising aggravated by religious prejudice when he appeared at the High Court in Edinburgh last month.

He pled guilty to setting fire to the doors of the Leith Methodist Church at Junction Place on August 28 this year by pouring petrol over them and applying a naked flame resulting in charring and burn marks.

He also admitted on the same day setting for to the doors of the Guru Nanak Sikh Temple at Sheriff Brae, in Leith, by gathering combustible material, placing it against the doors, pouring petrol on it and applying a flame with the result that the doors caught fire and smoke penetrated the building endangering the life of inhabitants.

The court heard that the temple priest Harbhajan Singh earlier secured the doors of the premises and went to family quarters at the rear of the building where he stayed with his wife and child.

Before 5 am Michal Kazimierczak walked to the temple with the intention of praying at the entrance prior to going to work and tried to clear what appeared to be litter from the a gap at the bottom of the doors only to discover it was alight and had taken hold.

He ran to the side of the building and alerted the sleeping priest and both men then tried to put out the fire using a bucket of water.

The fire brigade was alerted and 11 firefighters were deployed to bring the blaze under control. Significant burning and charring was seen on the doors and smoke had engulfed the building.

A caretaker at the Methodist church arrived at his work and smelled petrol and burning and saw scorch marks at the gate and steps at the front door. After media reports of the fire at the Sikh temple he contacted police.

Unemployed Johnson was caught on security cameras buying a jerry can and petrol at a BP service station in Ferry Road before midnight on August 27.

He was also seen on footage approaching the front door of the church shortly after midnight and a flash of light was captured.

Johnson was also seen on CCTV approaching the temple with the jerry can and lighting paper and throwing it towards the door. He repeatedly returned to light more paper and a burst of flame was later seen before he fled.

Johnson, who was evicted from his accommodation in the city’s Duddingston Crescent the day before the fire attacks, was found with three cigarette lighters when he was arrested on August 30.

He admitted starting the fires to police. Mr Cameron said: “He further stated that around midnight he walked to the Methodist church in Leith and poured fuel on the doors before using a lighter to set fire to pieces of paper which he threw on the fuel.”

“He stated that a small fire started but quickly went out. He stayed in the immediate area for some time but no emergency services attended,” said the prosecutor.

“He further stated that he then walked around Leith for around 40 minutes and on seeing the Sikh temple set fire to the doors using the same method as before,” he told the court.

Mr Cameron said “The accused stated that his intention in buying the petrol was to start the fire at the Methodist church and that the fire-raising at the Sikh temple was not planned and was only carried out when he came across the building.”

The prosecutor said Johnson was asked what his intention was in starting the fires and said “he wanted to watch them burn down”.

Defence counsel David Nicolson said Johnson was seen by a psychiatrist who confirmed that he was fit to plead.

On Thursday, Mr Nicolson told Lord Boyd that his client hadn’t co-operated with a specialist social worker who had been appointed to write a report into his background.

He added: “I am limited by what I can say. It is very limited. The primary form of mitigation which I can advance is that he tendered a plea of guilty at the earliest opportunity. I would ask you to take that into account.”

Speaking following the sentencing, Detective Inspector Grant Johnston from Gayfield CID said: “Paul Johnson showed absolutely no concern for the safety or wellbeing of those in or around either place of worship when he started these fires.

“As a result of a swift police investigation, Johnson was quickly traced and arrested in connection with the fire and has now been given a custodial sentence.

“We treat all hate crime incidents with the utmost seriousness and whenever such offences occur, we will conduct a thorough inquiry to bring those responsible to justice.”

Lord Boyd said that if Johnson hadn’t pleaded guilty, he would have received a six year sentence.

The Scotsman