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The son of a House of Lords clerk was a neo-Nazi Satanist who encouraged terrorism, a court has heard.

Prosecutors said Harry Vaughan, 18, had an “extreme right-wing and racist mindset”, and “an interest in explosives, firearms and violence”.

An Old Bailey sentencing hearing was told he had also downloaded indecent videos of children.

Vaughan, from south-west London, admitted 14 terror offences and two of possessing indecent images.

Extreme fringe

Prosecutor Dan Pawson-Pounds told the court Vaughan, who had been a pupil at Tiffin Grammar School in Kingston upon Thames, held a “hybrid” ideology “of left-hand path Satanism” and “accelerationism” – a belief that an inevitable collapse of civilisation should be brought about through acts of terrorism and criminality.

“Both these doctrines are at the most extreme fringe of Satanism and neo-Nazism,” he said.

The court heard Vaughan, a “focused and able” pupil who achieved A* in his A-Levels, was arrested in his bedroom in June 2019.

It was the result of an investigation into Fascist Forge – an online neo-Nazi forum where terrorism and sexual violence were openly encouraged.

Vaughan uploaded self-made propaganda images to the website promoting the now-banned terrorist organisation Sonnenkrieg Division.

He posted the pictures in a chat thread containing responses from two users – a 16-year-old boy from Durham and a younger teenager from Connecticut – who would later be involved in a terrorist attack plot.

The court heard he had earlier applied to join another British group – System Resistance Network – since outlawed as an alias of the neo-Nazi terror group National Action.

‘Have you got the others?’

His application had vowed he would do anything if he “thought it essential to the cause” and was accompanied by a poster saying: “Muslims Beware – Generation of Revenge – Islam Free Zone”.

Notes and search terms found on Vaughan’s devices included “where to cut to get most blood” and “annihilate females”.

Officers found a list of 129 internet accounts, usernames and passwords on a memory stick in his bedroom, and a large volume of extremist material totalling about 4,200 images and 302 media files.

Upon his arrest last summer, Vaughan asked detectives: “Have you got the others?”

But he refused to answer questions during police interviews and it is still unclear how he first became radicalised.

Police were unable to recover information relating to many of his earlier online activities due to Vaughan resetting his computer.

One document he created in 2018 included an address for an online alias – LionAW – associated with the American militant organisation Atomwaffen Division.

In mitigation, Naeem Mian QC said the defendant “intimates he was groomed” and “knows what he did was wrong”.

He said an expert report suggested that Vaughan was on the “autistic spectrum”.

Vaughan admitted 12 counts of possessing documents useful to a terrorist, one count of encouraging terrorism, and one of disseminating terrorist publications.

The indecent images offences relate to two videos of young boys being raped.

Vaughan will be sentenced on 23 October.

BBC News

Jacek Tchorzewski had links to Sonnenkrieg Division terrorist group



A neo-Nazi has been jailed for possessing indecent images of children and extreme pornography.

Jacek Tchorzewski, who had links to the Sonnenkrieg Division terrorist group, was imprisoned for terror offences last year.

But the 19-year-old has now been sentenced at Harrow Crown Court for downloading videos, photos and animations depicting child rape, incest and “sexual interference with a corpse”.

The court heard the material was discovered after police stopped Tchorzewski at Luton Airport on 20 February last year.

He had been about to board a flight back to Poland after visiting his mother, who lives in High Wycombe.

Prosecutor Margia Mostafa said officers who seized his phone and two laptops discovered “evidence of child pornography” as well as far-right terrorist material.

“The contents of the images are fairly distressing,” she added, saying there were four videos in the most serious category showing the rape of boys and girls as young as five.

Ms Mostafa said the victims shown included boys and girls, adding: “They have been clearly groomed and there is suggestion that these children are forced to smile at the camera.”

Tchorzewski also admitted possessing more than 500 images of extreme pornography, which mainly related to animations of characters from a popular children’s cartoon having incestuous sex.

He pleaded guilty to three counts of possessing indecent images of children and one of extreme pornography, including material depicting “an act which involved sexual interference with a corpse”.

Judge Anupama Thompson sentenced Tchorzewski to eight months’ imprisonment, which will run concurrently to his previous four-year sentence for possessing neo-Nazi terror manuals.

“It seems to me that as far as the public interest is concerned, there is nothing to be achieved from extending your sentence further from the one you are currently serving,” the judge added.

“Considerable time has passed since you were originally arrested and had things should be done as they should have, these would have been dealt with by the Central Criminal Court [during the terror case].”

Tchorzewski, wearing a blue-T-shirt and glasses, with a long hair and beard, remained impassive as he was sentenced on Wednesday.

The court heard that probation workers had been “trying to engage the defendant generally on his offending behaviour, but have not had a great deal of success”.

Robert English, for the defence, said Tchorzewski told him the images were downloaded when he was between 15 and 17.

“I asked him why he had those images and he says he was younger then, he had a curiosity, an interest,” he told the court.

“He has no interest now and it’s just something that occurred earlier in his life.”

Mr English said Tchorzewski was originally from Poland and had a “disjointed upbringing” moving between his father in that country and mother in the UK.

A pre-sentence report drawn up after his terror conviction said he was “self-contained and isolated”, had been bullied and struggled to form friendships and communicate.

Mr English said Tchorzewski was suspected to have autism spectrum disorder but there had been no formal diagnosis, adding: “These various traits … resulted in a lot of time spent alone on the internet.”

In September, he was jailed after pleading guilty to 10 counts of possessing documents useful to terrorists.

That court case heard that he also had Satanist literature depicting rape and paedophilia at his home.

The Metropolitan Police said Tchorzewski had “amassed a plethora of guides on terrorism, bomb making and gun production”.

He was friends with Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, a leading member of the banned neo-Nazi terrorist group Sonnekrieg Division.

Dunn-Koczorowski, who was a previous member of National Action, was jailed for terror offences last year after inciting terror attacks on targets including Prince Harry.

Co-defendant Michal Szewczuk, also a Polish national, ran a blog that encouraged the rape and torture of opponents, including small children, and Dunn-Koczorowski wrote about decapitating babies.

Tchorzewski’s phone contained several pictures of him and Dunn-Koczorowski posing with a Nazi flag and performing Hitler salutes.

Police found Tchorzewski had an array of extreme right-wing material praising Hitler, neo-Nazism, Satanism, antisemitism and calling for genocide.

At the time commander Richard Smith, head of the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command, said: “Tchorzewski’s obsession with neo-Nazism, terrorism and weaponry was not harmless curiosity.”

The Independent

Filip Golon Bednarczyk, 25, was arrested by counter-terror police last December
He pleaded guilty to having explosives and bomb-making instructions today
Bednarczyk allegedly searched the Internet for Nazis, Hitler, and Britain First

A far-Right extremist inspired by the Christchurch atrocity today pleaded guilty to having explosives and instructions on how to make bombs.

Filip Golon Bednarczyk, 25, of Luton, Bedfordshire, was arrested by detectives from the Metropolitan Police’s counter-terrorism unit on December 11 last year.

Police had suspected him of being a terrorist due to his interest in firearms and firearm attacks, his purchase of materials for an improvised explosive device and frequent Right-wing rhetoric.

A search of his bedsit led to the discovery of handwritten notes, electrical component parts and a 2kg bag of sulphur powder.

An analysis of his electronic devices revealed an interest in firearms, knives and killings as well as extreme right-wing views.

He had memes depicting support for the Christchurch attack in March 2019 in which 51 people were killed, as well as the attacker’s ‘manifesto’.

The defendant had also allegedly searched the internet for Nazis, Hitler, the Polish Defence League and Britain First.

During a virtual hearing at the Old Bailey today, Bednarczyk admitted possessing an explosive substance, namely sulphur powder, under suspicious circumstances between May and December last year.

He also pleaded guilty to seven charges of possessing a document likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism in relation to various titles about homemade explosives, including Semtex and black powder.

Prosecutor Dan Pawson-Pounds asked for sentencing to be put off to a later date.

He said the Crown had received a basis of plea from the defendant and a psychiatric report was being prepared.

Judge Anthony Leonard QC remanded the defendant into custody, telling him he would set a timetable to sentencing as soon as possible.
Daily Mail

Jacek Tchorzewski, 18 (17.11.00), a Polish national staying in Buckinghamshire, was handed the sentence for 10 counts of possession of information likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism, contrary to section 58, on Friday, 20 September at the Old Bailey.

He pleaded guilty to the offences at the same court on Friday, 21 June.

The sentencing is the culmination of an intelligence-led, joint operation by the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command and the Eastern Region Specialist Operation Unit Counter Terrorism Policing (ERSOU CTP).

Officers from the ERSOU CTP stopped Tchorzewski at Luton Airport on Wednesday, 20 February before he could board a flight to Poland.

Using powers under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000, they searched him and seized his mobile phone. Examination of this phone revealed Tchorzewski had saved a number of documents that were in breach of the Terrorism Act 2000, and so detectives arrested him on suspicion of terrorism offences.

Digital forensic experts from ERSOU CTP further examined Tchorzewski’s phone and unearthed a wider cache of terrorist documents and guidance on developing viable bombs and guns.

Subsequently, on Sunday, 14 April, detectives from the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command, supported by ERSOU CTP, further arrested Tchorzewski on suspicion of more terrorism offences.

The forensic specialists also found Tchorzewski had downloaded an array of extreme right-wing material which praised Hitler, neo-Nazism and Satanism. The documents featured anti-Semitic sentiments and even called for genocide.

It was also apparent that Tchorzewski was a close associate of Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, who had been convicted of terrorism offences months earlier after police in Counter Terrorism Policing North East identified he had been encouraging terrorism on a neo-Nazi group’s social media account.

Tchorzewski’s phone contained a number of pictures of him and Dunn-Koczorowski posing with a Nazi flag and giving Nazi salutes.

Commander Richard Smith, head of the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command, said: “Tchorzewski’s obsession with neo-Nazism, terrorism and weaponry was not harmless curiosity. It was clear from the sheer quantity of terrorist material and neo-Nazi propaganda on Tchorzewski’s devices, and his friendship with Dunn-Koczorowski, that his mindset was one of violence and hatred towards communities other than his own.

“The guides Tchorzewski had collected would provide someone, with the right materials, sufficient guidance to make viable explosives and firearms, capable of causing death or serious injury.

“This case is a reminder that police are working with determination to stop terrorists whatever their toxic ideology. Extreme right-wing cases like this one increasingly contribute to the overall number of counter terrorism investigations nationally and we are seeing more people of extreme right-wing mindset referred to Prevent.

“I urge anyone with concerns that an individual may be involved in extreme right-wing activity to report their concerns to police.”

Anyone with such concerns can report it online at http://www.gov.uk/act or by calling police confidentially on the free phone number 0800 789 321.

Detective Superintendent Ian Butler, head of the ERSOU CTP, said: “This is an excellent example of the wider CT network working together to mitigate the threat of extreme ideology, and clearly demonstrates that Eastern Region ports are a hostile environment for extremists seeking travel.”
Met Police

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, left, and Michal Szewczuk were members of British neo-Nazi group Sonnenkrieg Division which was exposed by the BBC

Two teenage neo-Nazis, who encouraged an attack on Prince Harry for marrying a woman of mixed race, have been jailed for terrorism offences.

Michal Szewczuk, 19, from Leeds, and Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, 18, from west London, were part of a group called the Sonnenkrieg Division.

An Old Bailey judge said their online propaganda was abhorrent and criminal.

Dunn-Koczorowski was given an 18-month detention and training order. Szewczuk was jailed for just over four years.

The defendants, who appeared by video link from HMP Belmarsh, in south-east London, did not react.

The court heard the teenagers used pseudonyms to run personal accounts on the Gab social media site, as well as sharing control of the Sonnenkrieg Division’s own page, on which they posted self-designed propaganda that encouraged terrorist attacks.

Among other things, the imagery suggested the Duke of Sussex was a “race traitor” who should be shot, glorified the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik, and said white women who date non-white men should be hung.

The material was “uniformly violent and threatening” and “the nature of the violence includes rape and execution”, judge Rebecca Poulet said.

Suggested targets included non-white and Jewish people, and the effect was to overtly encourage lone acts of violence against members of the public, the judge added.

She said the men had promoted both Sonnenkrieg and the American Atomwaffen Division, which were extreme right-wing groups inspired by a book called Siege written by the veteran American neo-Nazi James Mason in the 1980s.


‘Intent on action’

Their ideology is violently racist and anti-Semitic neo-Nazism and its tactics involve political violence through acting alone or small-cell terrorism, she added.

She condemned an “additional feature” of the ideology by referencing a blog run by Szewczuk that encouraged the rape of female adults and babies.

Sonnenkrieg’s activities were exposed last year by a BBC investigation.

Prosecutor Naomi Parsons, opening the case earlier in the hearing, told the court: “This isn’t a keyboard organisation. It is intent on action.”

She read from the group’s mission statement, which declared: “Will you rise up and take the chance or will you sit back and do nothing… Hail victory, and Heil Hitler!”

In April, Szewczuk admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism and five of possessing documents useful to a terrorist.

Dunn-Koczorowski pleaded guilty while still a youth in December to two counts of encouraging terrorism.

The court heard Sonnenkrieg was influenced by the US-based group Atomwaffen Division, which is linked to five murders, and Mason, whose writings “may well represent the most violent, revolutionary and potentially terroristic expression of right-wing extremism current today”.

Sonnenkrieg promoted the idea that people should completely “drop out” of society and engage in a “total attack” on the system, Ms Parsons told the court.

She said Szewczuk also maintained an “extremely violent and aggressively misogynistic” blog that encouraged the rape, torture and murder of women and babies.

“You must become a machine of terror,” Szewczuk had advised his readers.

In online comments, Dunn-Koczorowski suggested that decapitating babies would be acceptable to stop them becoming “leftist politicians” and proclaimed “terror is the best political weapon for nothing drives people harder than a fear of sudden death”.

The pair were arrested the morning after the BBC investigation was broadcast in December.

Detectives found Szewczuk – then a computer science student at the University of Portsmouth – in possession of bomb-making instructions, documents describing how to conduct Islamist terror attacks and a “white resistance” manual.

Hitler imagined as avatar of a god

By Daniel De Simone, BBC home affairs producer

Sonnenkrieg Division, which police say has the most radical ideology on the UK extreme right, is the latest neo-Nazi group to emerge following the proscription of National Action under anti-terror laws three years ago.

Created by a small number of people, Sonnenkrieg used the internet to exaggerate its size and capabilities, with members seeking direct action from those accessing its propaganda.

Terrorism and criminality were encouraged, as was the transgression of what it caricatured as slavish morality, with sexual violence and paedophilia both advocated.

Their bizarre supernatural belief system imagined Hitler to be an avatar of a god, lionised the Moors Murderer Ian Brady and cult leader Charles Manson, and blended violent Satanism, a berserk misogyny, and admiration for radical Islamism.

The aim? To undermine and collapse civilization, which the group deemed a necessary forerunner to the creation of a Nazi warrior society.

BBC News

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, left, and Michal Szewczuk were members of British neo-Nazi group Sonnenkrieg Division which was exposed by the BBC

Two teenage neo-Nazis, who encouraged an attack on Prince Harry for marrying a woman of mixed race, have been jailed for terrorism offences.

Michal Szewczuk, 19, from Leeds, and Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, 18, from west London, were part of a group called the Sonnenkrieg Division.

An Old Bailey judge said their online propaganda was abhorrent and criminal.

Dunn-Koczorowski was given an 18-month Detention and Training Order. Szewczuk was jailed for just over four years.

The defendants, who appeared by video link from HMP Belmarsh, in south-east London, did not react.

The court heard the teenagers used pseudonyms to run personal accounts on the Gab social media site, as well as sharing control of the Sonnenkrieg Division’s own page, on which they posted self-designed propaganda that encouraged terrorist attacks.

Among other things, the imagery suggested the Duke of Sussex was a “race traitor” who should be shot, glorified the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik, and said white women who date non-white men should be hung.

The material was “uniformly violent and threatening” and “the nature of the violence includes rape and execution”, judge Rebecca Poulet said.

Hitler imagined as avatar of a god

By Daniel De Simone, BBC home affairs producer

Sonnenkrieg Division, which police say has the most radical ideology on the UK extreme right, is the latest neo-Nazi group to emerge following the proscription of National Action under anti-terror laws three years ago.

Created by a small number of people, Sonnenkrieg used the internet to exaggerate its size and capabilities, with members seeking direct action from those accessing its propaganda.

Terrorism and criminality were encouraged, as was the transgression of what it caricatured as slavish morality, with sexual violence and paedophilia both advocated.

Their bizarre supernatural belief system imagined Hitler to be an avatar of a god, lionised the Moors Murderer Ian Brady and cult leader Charles Manson, and blended violent Satanism, a berserk misogyny, and admiration for radical Islamism.

The aim? To undermine and collapse civilization, which the group deemed a necessary forerunner to the creation of a Nazi warrior society.

The pair sentenced on Tuesday will have time to reflect whether this was all really such a good idea.

BBC News

Michal Szewczuk produced propaganda for a neo-Nazi group called the Sonnenkrieg Division


A teenage neo-Nazi who suggested Prince Harry should be shot for marrying a woman of mixed race has pleaded guilty to terror offences at the Old Bailey.

Michal Szewczuk, 19, of Leeds, admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism and five of possessing documents useful to a terrorist.

The charges relate to a neo-Nazi group called the Sonnenkrieg Division.

Co-defendant Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, 18, from west London, pleaded guilty in December to encouraging terrorism.

Both of them were granted conditional bail and are due to be sentenced at the Old Bailey on 17 June.

The pair produced Sonnenkrieg propaganda that, among other things, said Prince Harry was a “race traitor” who should be shot, and lionised the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik.

They publicised the propaganda on the social media site Gab, including on a page for the Sonnenkrieg group itself.

Szewczuk, hiding behind a pseudonym, also used a separate account to posts links to self-authored diatribes that called for the “systematic slaughtering” of women and the rape of babies.

Detectives found Szewczuk in possession of bomb-making instructions, documents describing how to conduct Islamist terror attacks and a “white resistance” manual.

The Sonnenkrieg group, which was exposed last year by a BBC investigation, was created as a British version of the American neo-Nazi organisation Atomwaffen Division, which has been linked to five murders.

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism in December

Szewczuk and Dunn-Koczorowski were arrested the morning after a BBC investigation exposed the group’s activities.

Another man was also arrested and has since been released under investigation.

The group’s ideology, which is influenced by figures such as the murderous cult leader Charles Manson, is a strain of neo-Nazism that openly encourages criminality and acts of terrorism.

Online propaganda and private chat logs show members engaging in extreme misogyny, as well as exalting Jihadist terrorism and a violent strand of Satanism.

Some private messages seen by the BBC suggest Sonnenkrieg members encouraged young women to engage in acts of self-harm.

The Sonnenkrieg Division grew out of a split in the now largely defunct System Resistance Network, which was created after the neo-Nazi group National Action was banned under anti-terror laws in 2016.

Sonnenkrieg and System Resistance Network both contained one-time members of National Action, including Dunn-Koczorowski.

BBC News

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism

A 17-year-old boy from west London has pleaded guilty to terror offences linked to the neo-Nazi group Sonnenkrieg Division.

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism.

He entered guilty pleas during an Old Bailey preliminary hearing.

A court order that prevented his identification was lifted by the judge.

He will be sentenced at a later date and will next appear on 25 February.

The charges state that in August this year Dunn-Koczorowki used accounts on the Gab social media site – including one for the Sonnenkrieg Division itself – to post material that would encourage others to prepare or engage in acts of terrorism.

He will be sentenced at a later date and will next appear the Old Bailey on 25 February 2019.

A co-defendant – Michael Szewczuk, 18, from Leeds – also appeared in court, but has not yet entered pleas.

Mr Szewczuk, a Polish national, is charged with five counts of encouraging terrorism and three of disseminating terrorist publications.

A provisional trial date was fixed for 13 May 2019 at Manchester Crown Court.

Both defendants were granted conditional bail.

BBC News