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Filip Golon Bednarczyk, 25, was arrested by counter-terror police last December
He pleaded guilty to having explosives and bomb-making instructions today
Bednarczyk allegedly searched the Internet for Nazis, Hitler, and Britain First

A far-Right extremist inspired by the Christchurch atrocity today pleaded guilty to having explosives and instructions on how to make bombs.

Filip Golon Bednarczyk, 25, of Luton, Bedfordshire, was arrested by detectives from the Metropolitan Police’s counter-terrorism unit on December 11 last year.

Police had suspected him of being a terrorist due to his interest in firearms and firearm attacks, his purchase of materials for an improvised explosive device and frequent Right-wing rhetoric.

A search of his bedsit led to the discovery of handwritten notes, electrical component parts and a 2kg bag of sulphur powder.

An analysis of his electronic devices revealed an interest in firearms, knives and killings as well as extreme right-wing views.

He had memes depicting support for the Christchurch attack in March 2019 in which 51 people were killed, as well as the attacker’s ‘manifesto’.

The defendant had also allegedly searched the internet for Nazis, Hitler, the Polish Defence League and Britain First.

During a virtual hearing at the Old Bailey today, Bednarczyk admitted possessing an explosive substance, namely sulphur powder, under suspicious circumstances between May and December last year.

He also pleaded guilty to seven charges of possessing a document likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism in relation to various titles about homemade explosives, including Semtex and black powder.

Prosecutor Dan Pawson-Pounds asked for sentencing to be put off to a later date.

He said the Crown had received a basis of plea from the defendant and a psychiatric report was being prepared.

Judge Anthony Leonard QC remanded the defendant into custody, telling him he would set a timetable to sentencing as soon as possible.
Daily Mail

A paedophile from Luton has been jailed for two years and eight months after downloading thousands of indecent images of children.

Carl Tofts, 27, of Harcourt Street, was handed a 32-month prison term at Luton Crown Court on Monday after being convicted of possessing over 2,500 images of children being abused.

Police raided Tofts’ home in June 2016 after receiving intelligence that someone at that address was accessing indecent images of children via the internet.

Tofts was arrested and subsequently released on bail, while officers seized his devices to download and investigate the content.

He was arrested again in January 2017 by Norfolk Police for similar offences and, in November 2018, he was charged with making and distributing indecent images of children and possession of extreme images.

More than 2,500 images and videos ranging from the most serious category A to category C were found on his devices.

Investigating Officer Michela Zasada said: “Owing to a number of obstacles, it has taken us three years to bring Tofts to justice.

“I am pleased that he has received a custodial sentence for his despicable crimes against children.

“Viewing and possessing indecent images of children is by no means a victimless crime. It causes and propagates real harm to the children concerned, as they are abused and exploited in such a vile and appalling way, and people like Tofts share this disgusting abuse online for other individuals to view.

“We are dedicated to tackling offences of this nature, and hope that the custodial sentence Tofts has received today sends a strong message to others who seek gratification by abusing children in this way.”

In addition to the prison term, Tofts also received an indefinite Sexual Harm Prevention Order, with conditions he must follow on his release from prison.

Parents can visit the Parents Protect website, which is run by the Lucy Faithfull Foundation, for lots of useful resources to help prevent online child sexual abuse. It also contains a list of organisations and resources focusing on keeping children safe in the digital world.

The NSPCC Share Aware website also contains advice and tips about how children can keep themselves safe online.

Luton Today

Far-right activist will serve 10 weeks after being found guilty of breaching reporting ban

Tommy Robinson pictured outside the Old Bailey, where his supporters later clashed with police. Photograph: Luke Dray/Getty Images

Tommy Robinson has been given a nine-month prison sentence – of which he will serve about 10 weeks – after he was found guilty of contempt of court at an earlier hearing.

Robinson, whose real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, broadcast reports that encouraged “vigilante action” and “unlawful physical” aggression against defendants in a sexual exploitation trial, according to the judges who found him guilty last week.

Passing sentence on Thursday, Dame Victoria Sharp said of Robinson: “He has lied about a number of matters and sought to portray himself as the victim of unfairness and oppression.

“This does not increase his sentence, but it does mean that there can be no reduction for an admission of guilt.”

Robinson, 36, from Luton in Bedfordshire, had denied breaching a reporting ban by livestreaming footage of defendants arriving at court. He insisted he had only referred to information already in the public domain.

After deduction for time served, the sentence will amount to 19 weeks, of which he will serve half before being released.

The former leader of the far-right English Defence League flashed a V for victory sign to the public gallery upon hearing the sentence, and later winked as he slung a bag over his shoulder and was led away by prison officers.

He arrived outside the Old Bailey dressed in blue jeans and a black T-shirt bearing the words “convicted of journalism”, but was wearing a plain black one inside, where his barrister apologised for the defendant’s late arrival. Sharp, the lead judge, said: “Well, it’s not a very good start, is it?”

Police officers put on riot helmets and drew batons as bottles and cans were thrown when a crowd of Robinson supporters outside the court erupted with anger after the news from inside filtered through.

At least three people were arrested, City of London police said. The crowd later made its way to the Carriage Gates of the Houses of Parliament, blocking roads as they went.

Blocking the roads outside parliament they waved signs bearing slogans including “Tommy Robinson: political prisoner”, chanted support for the far-right activist and other slogans in favour of Brexit, as well as calling MPs “traitors”.

There were some briefly chaotic scenes as some protesters shouted abuse at police, and then crowded and jostled officers when one person was detained. Some protesters yelled “Paedophile protesters!” at police.

Several members of the crowd were holding cans of beer or cider, and one was overheard making racist comments.

The crowd, diminishing in numbers, moved around Parliament Square for a period before heading in the direction of Victoria.

Passing sentence at the Old Bailey alongside Mr Justice Warby, Sharp told Robinson they were in no doubt the custody threshold had been passed and the judges had taken account of information including the impact of prison on his health and family.

Aidan Eardley, the barrister for the attorney general, who had made the application for Robinson to be jailed, began earlier by outlining the sentencing options, adding that complicating factors included time already served, which amounted to 68 days in custody.

Robinson had been sentenced to 10 months when he was first jailed for the video he livestreamed from outside Leeds crown court, but appeal judges then ordered the case be reheard in full.

His barrister, Richard Furlong, said there had been no further incidences of contempt and asked the court to consider any actual harm caused by his client’s actions.

“Notwithstanding the seriousness of what has been found to be proven against him, in terms of actual harm to the trial of the criminal defendants in Leeds, there is no suggestion that the criminal defendants in Leeds did not have a fair trial, notwithstanding his conduct outside the court,” Furlong said.

Addressing his client’s state of mind, Furlong said there were a number of relevant categories, and “recklessness” was not as serious as others from the point of view of sentencing.

After sentencing, Furlong raised the possibility of an appeal against the court’s decision on contempt and was told he had 28 days to apply.

Speaking afterwards, the attorney general, Geoffrey Cox, said: “Today’s sentencing of Yaxley-Lennon serves to illustrate how seriously the courts will take matters of contempt.”

Nick Lowles, the chief executive of the campaign group Hope Not Hate, said: “Stephen Lennon put at risk the trial of men accused of horrendous crimes with his livestreaming antics. He doesn’t care about the victims of grooming, he only cares about himself. He now faces yet another stint behind bars.”

Earlier this week, Robinson made an emotional appeal to the US president, Donald Trump, to grant him asylum, claiming he faced being killed in prison.

On Thursday, he was supported in court by the far-right commentator Katie Hopkins. Others in court included Ezra Levant, the founder of the Rebel Media, a Canadian far-right website.

Gerard Batten, the former Ukip leader who had taken on Robinson as an adviser before the party was wiped out in the European parliament elections in May, addressed the crowd outside from a stage.

Robinson meanwhile issued an appeal using the Telegram messaging app for supporters to protest outside prison on Saturday.

A full decision of the high court, released on Tuesday, explained the reasons for ruling against him. Sharp, the president of the Queen’s bench division, and Warby produced a three-page judgment setting out their findings last week.

“We are entirely satisfied that [Robinson] had actual knowledge that there was an order in force restricting reporting of the trial,” the judges concluded. “He said as much, repeatedly, on the video itself.”

Robinson was found to have committed contempt by breaching a reporting restriction, risked impeding the course of justice and interfered with the administration of justice by “aggressively and openly filming” the arrival of defendants at court.

Commenting on the impact of Robinson’s actions, the judges said: “The dangers of using the unmoderated platforms of social media, with the unparalleled speed and reach of such communications, are obvious.”

The Guardian

Thomas Johnstone, 29, also reportedly chanted anti-Muslim slogans during a protest organised by the English Defence League

Thomas Johnstone waved an England flag scrawled with 'f*** Islam' across it just 24 hours after Britain voted to leave the EU

Thomas Johnstone waved an England flag scrawled with ‘f*** Islam’ across it just 24 hours after Britain voted to leave the EU

A racist thug waved an England flag scrawled with ‘f*** Islam’ across it – just 24 hours after Britain voted to leave the EU.

Thomas Johnstone also chanted anti-Muslim slogans during an English Defence League protest on Saturday.

The 29-year-old’s chants got louder as Asian drivers or pedestrians passed him while he took part in the demonstration, a court heard.

Around 30 members of the far-right group had gathered outside the Manarat Foundation mosque in Birmingham.

The court heard that on the flag was written ‘no more mosques,’ ‘English ’till I die’ and ‘f*** Islam’.”

Johnstone yesterday admitted two counts of causing religiously aggravated harassment alarm or stress under the Public Order Act at Birmingham Magistrates’ Court.

He also pleaded guilty to obstructing an officer after giving police his brother’s name when arrested.

Johnstone, of Luton, was handed a £400 fine but was told he would not have to pay because of the time he had spent in custody since Saturday.

He remained in custody after being recalled to prison on licence on other matters.

Helen Shipley, prosecuting, said demonstrators were herded by police to one side of the Coventry Road in Birmingham.

Johnstone had a St George’s flag draped around his neck.

Miss Shipley said: “He appeared to film police because he wanted their opinion on a new mosque.

“He removed the flag and was holding it up towards motorists.

“On the flag was written ‘no more mosques’ and ‘English ’till I die’ and ‘f*** Islam’.”

Miss Shipley said Johnstone was also chanting offensive anti-Muslim slogans and got more vocal when Asian drivers or pedestrians passed by.

After being arrested Johnstone gave police the name of his brother but was found out when fingerprint tests revealed his true identity.

Ben Galletti, defending, said Johnstone had been recalled on licence to prison on other matters and was not due for release until June 1 next year.

District Judge Robert Zara fined Johnstone £150 for each of the religiously aggravated offences and £100 for obstructing an officer.

He said: “The maximum penalty for public order offences is only a fine whatever view I may take of your conduct.

“Because you are now a serving prisoner I will deem the time spent in custody since your arrest should serve in default of payment.”

On a Facebook profile page Johnstone appears to be connected to the Coventry branch of the EDL.

A status update from May said: “Before ny1(sic) forms an opinion of what I believe in please google what the EDL fight for.”

Daily Mirror

ELEVEN Lincoln City football fans who clashed with Luton Town fans have been sentenced for violent disorder charges at Lincoln Magistrates Court today.

The Lincoln fans pleaded guilty to the charges, which relate to a violent clash in a Lincoln pub before Lincoln City’s home game against Luton Town in October last year.

The violence started in The Ritz pub, before spilling out into High Street and Firth Road.

Furniture and glasses were thrown and two women were treated in hospital for minor injuries.

The below 12 defendants pleaded guilty to violent disorder at earlier hearings:

Nathan Luke Ashmore (33), of St Catherine’s Grove, Lincoln – 3 years prison

Tomas Samways (20), of Jenson Road, Bracebridge Heath – 2 years 4 months young offenders institute

Lee Anthony Oliver Swain (26), of Walnut Place, Lincoln – 3 years prison

Daniel Oliver White (20), of St Johns Road, Bracebridge Heath – 2 years 4 months young offenders institute

Marcus Johnathan Greatorex (22), of Geneva Avenue, Lincoln – 2 years 8 month prison

Phillip Neil Adams (36), of Prior Street, Lincoln – 3 years prison

Callum Busby (19), of De Wint Avenue, Lincoln – 2 years 8 months prison

Ashley Evans (22), of Picton Street, Lincoln – 3 years prison

Andrew John Deans (27), Clipstone Village, Mansfield – 3 years prison

Jake Sinclair (26), of Vernon Street, Lincoln – 2 years 8 months prison

Liam Wiggins (18), of Chester Road, Birkinhead – 2 years 1 month young offenders institute

Josh Atter (18), of Matlock Drive, North Hykeham – 18 months detention and training order

All defendents were given a ten-year football banning order.

DI Suzanne Davies, from Lincolnshire Police, said: “This was a protracted police investigation that went to great lengths to track down every single offender involved in the violence on that day.

“Its success was largely down to the tenacity and professionalism of PC Andy Pearson.

“All of these offenders are thugs who masquerade as football fans.

“ give decent, law abiding home and visiting fans a bad name and they have rightfully been brought to justice.

“We hope our investigation and the subsequent convictions and sentences send out a very clear message to offenders in Lincoln and those visiting to cause trouble.

“We will arrest you and put you before the courts.”

Luton & Dunstable Express

A Luton man, who carried out a racially aggravated assault when a mob went on the rampage in Luton in May last year, has been sentenced to 16 months imprisonment today, March 26, at Luton Crown Court.

Kier McElroy, 19, of Langford Drive, attacked a young Asian man in a shop doorway in Chapel Street, hitting him across the head with a placard he was holding.

On March 5, a jury at Luton Crown Court, found McElroy guilty of racially aggravated assault occasioning actual bodily harm on a Luton student.

He had earlier admitted assaulting the student occasioning him actual bodily harm and a second charge of affray, which resulted from his actions that day.

Luton Today

kevin-carroll-court-case-11-1279816669-article-0

A judge and two magistrates decided Kevin Carroll’s behaviour had been likely that day to cause alarm and distress in Luton Town Centre.

But minutes after losing his appeal Mr Carroll a 41 year old carpenter emerged from Luton crown court where his case had been heard to a hero’s welcome.

Scores of young men chanted “EDL, EDL” a reference to the right wing group, The English Defence League.

Mr Carroll addressed the crowd saying “Thank you patriots and people of our great democracy for supporting me.”

He said the country was “falling” more and more under the influence of Sharia law and he and people like him were being “treated like enemies of the state.”

To rousing applause he ended by “God Bless our Troops, God save the Queen.”

Later he said “I am disappointed by the court’s decision but I will accept it on the chin and move on”

He said on the day of the protest by Muslim extremists which had led to his arrest he had been intent on protecting a group of veterans and old soldiers.

He added what upset him most that day was that the extremists had been allowed to protest in front of the soldiers and next to their families who had attended the parade

Caroll, a married man had gone to court earlier in the day to appeal against his conviction earlier this year when he was found guilty of using threatening words and behaviour likely to to cause fear harassment and alarm.

In court Judge Christopher Compston hearing the case was told how on March 10 last year there was a home coming parade by the 2nd Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment through Luton Town Centre.

But within minutes of the march getting underway a group of Islamic extremists staged an anti war protest

They had placards and shouted at the troops “Butchers of Basra” and “British soldiers go to hell.

The group were standing near the town hall and an angry crowd, incensed that the soldiers were being subjected to the protest, began a counter demonstration.

They had to be separated from the young Muslims by a cordon of police officers.

In a stand off the crowd were heard to shout “No surrender to the Talban,” “England, England” and “Scum, Scum Scum.

Carroll of Bolingbroke Road, Luton was captured on town centre CCTV as being part of the crowd angry at the Muslim protest.

He was arrested later by police officers and earlier this year found guilty of the public order offence and given a nine month conditional discharge and told he must pay costs of £175.

In court Mr Carroll said he had been “extremely angry and upset” when he saw the extremists protesting against the soldiers”

He said there was an “instantaneous upset” among many people who had gone to the parade and he had ended as part of a crowd that had vented their anger towards the protesters.

“I just couldn’t believe they had been allowed to do that.

He said at one point he ran towards a group of veterans because he thought the Muslim protester was heading in their protection and he wanted to protect the old soldiers.

“I swore at the extremists, I don’t deny that, but it was a crazy situation. It was not something I condone but there was so much anger and emotion from everyone.”

He added “Everyone was doing the same thing. People were so upset by what these people had done and wanted to give them a piece of their mind”

He added “Everyone in the vicinity was swearing and shouting and roaring”

Mr Carroll denied that he’d been a ring leader that day

Dismissing the appeal Judge Christopher Compston told Carroll “We have no doubt at all that you did use threatening, abusive and insulting words and behaviour which was likely to cause harassment, alarm and distress.”

The judge said the CCTV evidence had been overwhelming and he went on “We dismiss your appeal.

He ordered that Carroll pay further costs of £330.

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