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Welsh man Jonathan Jennings handed 16-month prison sentence for Islamophobic and threatening posts

Jonathan Jennings pled guilty to 10 offences

Jonathan Jennings pled guilty to 10 offences

A man who posted anti-Muslim messages on social media and made a threat to kill Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has been jailed for 16 months.

Jonathan Jennings used platforms such as YouTube and GAB – billed as the “free speech” social network – to make Islamophobic statements inciting religious hatred.

Prosecutors revealed the 34-year-old man from Carmarthenshire had written posts calling for all Muslims to be gassed and to be forcibly sterilised. He claimed those who tried to convert others to Islam should be sentenced to death.

He repeatedly called for the murder of Muslims and supported “bomb a mosque day” suggested by another extremist, Nigel Pelham, who was jailed last year.

Sentenced at Swansea Crown Court on Thursday, Jennings pled guilty to four offences of inciting racial hatred and another six offences related to the sending of material with the intention of causing distress and anxiety.

The Crown Prosecution Service today said his jail sentence “reflects the seriousness of his crimes.”

Between March and August last year, Jennings also posted a series of threatening messages about left-leaning public figures and one about the Jewish community, alongside his diatribes about British Muslims.

In March 2017 he called Gina Miller – the prominent lawyer who led a legal challenge against Brexit – a traitor and called for her to be executed.

A few months later he said if Jeremy Corbyn became prime minister he would be first in line to “Jo Cox him” – a reference to the murder of the Labour MP by a right-wing extremist back in June 2016.

Another message stated that Hitler was born a 100 years too soon. He went on to threaten the Jewish community, saying if they did not behave themselves they would share the same fate as Muslims.

Deb Walsh from the CPS said: “Jonathan Jennings’ hatred of Muslims led him to post online messages stirring up animosity towards a whole community.

“He did not limit himself to expressing his views but called on others to indiscriminately kill Muslims and bomb mosques. Jennings also targeted the Jewish community and called for public figures whose views he did not like to be executed.

“The prison sentence reflects the seriousness of his crimes.”

Detective Superintendent Jim Hall of the Wales Extremism and Counter Terrorism Unit said: “We are committed to tackling all forms of extremism which has the potential to threaten public safety and security.

“Such was the strength of evidence of Jennings’ activities that he entered guilty pleas to all of the offences.

“There have been a number of successful prosecutions over recent years and this is testament to the work of police teams up and down the country.”

DS Jim Hall hailed the help of the public in identifying incitement of racial hatred and other forms of extremism.

“Nobody is better placed to detect something that is out of place in their communities than the people living in them,” he said. “To effectively combat the terrorism threat the police, businesses, government and the general public need to work together.”

“Anyone who sees or hears something that could be terrorist-related should act on their instincts and call the police in confidence on 0800 789 321.”

The Independent

A gang of white supremacists convicted of inciting racial hatred for plastering racist stickers around a university campus have been jailed.

Chad Williams-Allen and Garry Jack were both convicted, along with two other men, of inciting racial hatred after plastering offensive stickers across Aston University campus signs in Birmingham in 2016.

Chad Williams-Allen and Garry Jack were both convicted, along with two other men, of inciting racial hatred after plastering offensive stickers across Aston University campus signs in Birmingham in 2016.

Stickers put up at Aston University in Birmingham read “White Zone” and “Britain is ours – the rest must go” on the day of a Black Lives Matter march.

The men also posed for a souvenir-style photo doing Nazi-type salutes.

A judge said they had “potential to cause social unrest and racial tension in the city”.

Chad Williams-Allen, 27, from Bird End, West Bromwich, was sentenced to 21 months in prison during a hearing at Birmingham Crown Court.

Two other men, aged 23 and 27, who cannot be named for legal reasons, were handed 12-month and 16-month sentences respectively.

Garry Jack, 21, formerly of Heathland Road, Shard End, was given a 12-month sentence, suspended for two-years.

The men posed for a photo at Birmingham City University

The men posed for a photo at Birmingham City University

The men, who were caught on the university’s CCTV, accepted posting the 11 stickers, but denied they incited racial hatred.

They insisted they were exercising their right to freedom of speech during the incident on 9 July, 2016.

Judge Paul Farrer QC told them: “The stickers could encourage people to believe that, as you would refer to them, ‘non-whites’ represent a danger to society, and society should be divided along lines of race.”

He also told Williams-Allen, an unemployed welder: “You identified with Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany. You are anti-Semitic and a profound racist

Stickers were also recruitment tools for National Action, which the men were then members of, the judge said.

Images of the men’s handiwork was posted to the extreme far right group’s regional Twitter account soon afterwards, the hearing was told.

Judge Farrer added: “In this way you each intended to stir up racial hatred.

“Your behaviour was calculated to not only undermine these values, but also to foment hatred and unrest in society.”

BBC News

A group of white supremacists have been jailed for plastering racist stickers across a city centre university campus.

After stickering prominent signage on the site, the men then posed for a souvenir-style photo doing Nazi-type salutes and holding the black flag of far-right organisation National Action.

Sentencing the men on Wednesday, a judge said the “pernicious” stickers deposited at Aston University, Birmingham, had “potential to cause social unrest and racial tension in the city”.

Judge Paul Farrer QC, sitting at Birmingham Crown Court, told the men: “The stickers could encourage people to believe that, as you would refer to them ‘non-whites’, represent a danger to society, and society should be divided along lines of race.”

He added that the stickers were also recruitment tools for National Action, of which the men were all then members.

Images of the men’s handiwork was posted to the extreme far right group’s regional Twitter account soon afterwards.

Judge Farrer added: “In this way you each intended to stir up racial hatred.

“We are fortunate to live in a tolerant society.

“Your behaviour was calculated to not only undermine these values, but also to foment hatred and unrest in society.

“The gravity of the offences means it demands immediate imprisonment – with one exception.”

Chad Williams-Allen and Garry Jack were both convicted, along with two other men, of inciting racial hatred after plastering offensive stickers across Aston University campus signs in Birmingham in 2016.

Chad Williams-Allen and Garry Jack were both convicted, along with two other men, of inciting racial hatred after plastering offensive stickers across Aston University campus signs in Birmingham in 2016.

Following a trial last month, Chad Williams-Allen, of Tantany Lane, West Bromwich, and Garry Jack, 22, formerly of Heathland Avenue, Birmingham, were convicted of stirring up racial hatred, alongside two other men who cannot be named for legal reasons.

Williams-Allen, the court heard, played a central role and had a previous conviction for uttering a racially abusive remark at a National Action rally in May 2016, which the judge said was a “significant aggravating factor”.

Farrer told the 27-year-old unemployed welder: “You identified with Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany.

“You are anti-Semitic and a profound racist.

“You made contact with National Action in March 2016, but not require their influence to harbour extreme views on race and multiculturalism.”

Williams-Allen, who had also stated a race war was “inevitable”, was jailed for 21 months with the court hearing how he had provided most of the 11 offensive stickers used on July 9 2016.

The judge sentenced Jack to 12 months for his “subordinate role”, suspending the term for two years, and handing him a five-year criminal behaviour order.

Two other men, a 27-year-old and a 23-year-old, were jailed for 16 months and 12 months respectively for their parts in the enterprise.

After carrying out their stickering, the group bragged about how their activities stirred up offence among “butt-hurt students, sub-humans, and traitors”.

One of the stickers, put on an entrance sign, showed a white figure giving a Nazi-type salute, and carried the words “White Zone – National Action”.

Another read: “Britain is ours – the rest must go.”

A message then later appeared on the Twitter account of the group’s regional arm, the day after the stickering, stating: “The fashy goys (sic) of National Action have hit Aston University campus”.

In 2016 NA became the first far-right group to be banned in the UK.

Then-Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, described the neo-Nazi group as “a racist, anti-Semitic and homophobic organisation”.

The sentences come the day after an alleged member of the group pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism by plotting to murder MP Rosie Cooper last summer.

Jack Renshaw, 23, from Skelmersdale, Lancashire, bought a Gladius Machete to kill the Labour politican last year.

On the opening day of his trial at the Old Bailey, Renshaw pleaded guilty to preparing acts of terrorism as well as making a threat to kill police officer Victoria Henderson.

The court is today due to hear from a whistleblower from the group.
Huffington Post


Four men have today been found guilty after posting extreme right wing stickers across a campus of a city centre university. A fifth man was acquitted.

The four were caught on CCTV on the evening of 9 July 2016 posting the stickers on signage at Aston University with the intention of inciting racial hatred. The stickers were discovered by security staff two days later and reported to police who started a hate crime investigation.

On the same day in Birmingham city centre, a Black Lives Matter demonstration was also being held.

The jury at Birmingham Crown Court took just over four hours to return the guilty verdicts.

The group comprises:

Chad Williams-Allen, aged 26 from Tantany Lane, West Bromwich and Gary Jack, aged 21, from Heathland Road, Shard End.

Two other men also stood trial but cannot be named for legal reasons.

They are due to be sentenced on 1 June.

Detective Chief Superintendent Matt Ward, who heads the West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit, said: “We are committed to tackling all forms of extremism which has the potential to threaten public safety and security.”

Anyone who sees or hears something that could be terrorist-related should act on their instincts and call the police in confidence on 0800 789 321. In an emergency, always dial 999. Visit gov.uk/ACT for more information, including how to report extremist or terrorist content that is online.

West Midlands Police

A BNP activist has been jailed for four months for posting thousands of racist leaflets around the Muslim community in Glasgow.

David Wilson, 31, a father of two, was sentenced after being found guilty of inciting racial hatred last year. He posted the leaflets through as many as 4,000 doors in the Pollokshields area of the city, urging residents to stop “militant Muslims”.

Yesterday, security was stepped up as Wilson appeared at Glasgow Sheriff Court for sentencing amid fears of clashes between anti-nazi protesters and BNP activists. Sheriff Linda Ruxton told Wilson: “You have been convicted of distributing written material which was threatening, abusive and insulting, whereby you intended to stir up racial tensions in Pollokshields.

“Such conduct threatens to destabilise a community and threatens to undermine all the efforts by the community to enjoy good racial relations.

“A sentence of imprisonment is only appropriate given the nature of the offence.

“It should also serve as a strong deterrent to others, making clear that such behaviour strikes at the heart of community life and will not be tolerated.”

Sheriff Ruxton then jailed him for four months.

Afterwards, the outcome was widely welcomed by anti-racism protesters in Scotland.

At an earlier hearing, Wilson, of Dalmuir, Glasgow, became the first person north of the Border to be convicted of the offence of inciting racial hatred after it was proved he targeted one particular nationality with the racist literature.

Ninety per cent of Muslims in the Pollokshields area come from Pakistan.

The court was told Wilson had joined other BNP members posting the letters to the homes of both blacks and whites in July last year.

Their campaign group – Families Against Immigrant Racism – alleged white people were being subjected to a series of violent attacks on the south side of the city.

About 100 police officers were drafted in with another 20 in the courtroom as Wilson was led in.

Kenneth Waddell, defending, told the court his client had already suffered as the offence had destroyed his marriage. It is also believed he will more than likely now be sacked from his 20,000 a year job as an engineer at BAE Systems, in the city.

The Scotsman

From 2002

Lawrence Burns, 26, made anti-semitic comments and shared Hitler imagery online

Lawrence Burns from Cambridge during his appearance at Crown Court in Cambridge last year

Lawrence Burns from Cambridge during his appearance at Crown Court in Cambridge last year



An extremist who made anti-semitic comments and shared Hitler imagery online has been jailed for four years.

Lawrence Burns, 26, had earlier been found guilty of two charges of inciting racial hatred in a string of provocative Facebook posts in 2014.

He was also prosecuted for making a racist speech at a memorial demonstration for American white supremacist leader David Lane.

In the speech, which was later shared online via YouTube, Burns was heard to refer to Jews as “parasites” that wanted to create a “mongrelised race”.

Burns, of Coldham’s Lane, Cambridge, was charged with the two offences on January 22 last year and found guilty in December.

A judge at Peterborough Crown Court today ruled that he should serve a total of four years in prison for his offences.

During the trial it was alleged that Burns commented on a YouTube video that he wanted to “hang the black race”, while also sharing Adolf Hitler artwork.

Jurors were shown screenshots of hundreds of Facebook posts that Burns had written under a different name.

In one post, Burns is alleged to have written that black children were born with a “horrible” nature and were mean to animals.

He is also reported to have written: “The white race is the only race that can boost evolution. The rest of the other races must be eliminated.”

Prosecutor Mark Weekes earlier summarised Burns’s extreme views to the court. He said: “This is a young man who is an extremist and has expressed racist views, particularly towards the Jewish and Afro-Caribbean community.

“On his public Facebook account, which has more than 90 friends, he expressed some of the vilest and most offensive sentiments possible.

“Many of the posts are abusive and insulting towards Jews, who he refers to as ‘sub human animals’ and contain offensive words.”

Mr Weekes added that in a post on August 28, 2014, Burns accused white women of “mating with race-mixing filth” and on September 1, 2014, compared Jews to “maggots in a decaying body” who are “hijacking the genes of a superior white race”.

Adrian Davis, who defended Burns during the course of the trial, said Burns had mistakenly thought his Facebook account was set up to keep his posts private.

He said someone seeking to incite racial hatred would seek the largest possible audience, whereas Burns had set out to do the “very opposite, but messed it up”.

Mr Davis said Burns was a “rash young man” who had never intended his words to be read by a wide audience.

Cambridge News