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Six individuals are the last in a group of 14 to be jailed for almost 18 years for their part in violent disorder in Whitehall on 9 June 2018.

The following pleaded guilty to violent disorder and were sentenced on Monday, 30 September:

– Mitchell Feneck, 21 (17.07.98) of Haverfordwest, Dyfed was sentenced to 10 months’ imprisonment.

– Max Hammet-Millay, 22 (9.05.97) of Wenlock Road, N1 was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment.

– Mark Ransome, 25 (7.02.94) of Romford Road, RM5 was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment.

– James Thomas, 28 (24.10.90) of Priory View Road, Burton, Dorset was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

– John Cummings, 49 (16.09.70) of Hunters Hall Road, Dagenham, Essex was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

– Charles Haig, 24 (22.03.95) of East Street, Seaford, East Sussex was sentenced to 12 months’ imprisonment.

An additional eight defendants were sentenced on Friday, 27 September having previously pleaded guilty to violent disorder. They are:

– Danny Grealey, 43 (28.06.76) of Ebberns Road, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

– Kate Beveridge, 35 (04.04.84) of Pool Foot Lane, Singleton, Lancashire was sentenced to 15 months, suspended for 18 months, and was ordered to carry out 200 hours of unpaid work.

– Robert Sandford, 47 (27.11.71) of Bolton Road, Hungerhill, Bolton was sentenced to 14 months’ imprisonment.

– Keith O’Sullivan, 40 (22.04.79) of Holmstead Way, Luton was sentenced to 23 months’ imprisonment.

– Andrew McLean, 20 (18.11.98) of Field Street, Wolverhampton was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

– David Anderson, 23 (06.05.95) of Moraine Drive, Glasgow was sentenced to 14 months’ imprisonment.

– Kai Smith, 19 (09.10.99) of Middleton Close, London, E4 was sentenced to 15 months’ imprisonment.

– Carl Gustav Backland, 59 (14.11.59) of Grafton Way, Camden was sentenced to nine months’ imprisonment.

On 9 June 2018, serious disorder broke out at a ‘Free Tommy Robinson’ demonstration in Whitehall. Scaffolding, glass bottles and items of street furniture, including heavy barriers, were thrown at police. More than 20 officers suffered injuries. Serious disruption was caused to members of the public, local businesses and the local community as a result.

Operation Augusta was launched by the Met to bring those involved in the disorder to justice.

Detective Sergeant Matt Hearing, who led the Operation Augusta team, said: “This investigation proved extremely challenging with hundreds of hours of CCTV, video and Body Worn Video to examine. However, such was the weight of evidence brought against those charged, that all pleaded guilty.

“Peaceful protest plays an important role in our society. However, the actions of some involved in this demonstration showed a contempt both for the law and the police. Officers that day were there to ensure the safety of all those taking part, yet were met with abuse and violence.”

Robert Hutchinson, prosecutor from the London CPS complex casework unit, said: “The terrifying disorder wreaked by these individuals in the heart of London on 9 June 2018, was inexcusable. Protestors set out to intimidate and hurt police, injuring more than 20 officers who were protecting the public and tourists in Central London on the day of Trooping of the Colour, and who should have been able to go about their duties without fear of violence.

“This was a complex case and has involved exceptionally close liaison with the police from an early stage to determine appropriate charges that reflected the seriousness of their crimes. The strong case we built ultimately left the defendants with no choice but to plead guilty.

“The sentences passed should serve as a warning that those who direct violence towards police and act in this way will face prosecution and potentially prison.”

Met Police

*** Note *** We have been asked to point out that Carl Gustav Backland is not a member of the far-right and was caught up in the violence on the day whilst trying to get to the counter protest.

Eight individuals involved in violent disorder which took place in Whitehall on 9 June 2018, have been sentenced at Southwark Crown Court, having pleaded guilty to violent disorder, contrary to section 2 of the Public Order Act 1986.

They were sentenced on Friday, 27 September as follows:

Danny Grealey, 43 (28.06.76) of Ebberns Road, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

Kate Beveridge, 35 (04.04.84) of Pool Foot Lane, Singleton, Lancashire was sentenced to 15 months, suspended for 18 months, and was ordered to carry out 200 hours of unpaid work.

Robert Sandford, 47 (27.11.71) of Bolton Road, Hungerhill, Bolton was sentenced to 14 months’ imprisonment.

Keith O’Sullivan, 40 (22.04.79) of Holmstead Way, Luton was sentenced to 23 months’ imprisonment.

Andrew McLean, 20 (18.11.98) of Field Street, Wolverhampton was sentenced to 18 months’ imprisonment.

David Anderson, 23 (06.05.95) of Moraine Drive, Glasgow was sentenced to 14 months’ imprisonment.

Kai Smith, 19 (09.10.99) of Middleton Close, London, E4 was sentenced to 15 months’ imprisonment.

Carl Gustav Backland, 59 (14.11.59) of Grafton Way, Camden was sentenced to nine months’ imprisonment.

A further six individuals will be sentenced on Monday, 30 September.

On 9 June 2018, serious disorder broke out at a ‘Free Tommy Robinson’ demonstration in Whitehall. Scaffolding, glass bottles and items of street furniture, including heavy barriers, were thrown at police. More than 20 officers suffered injuries. Serious disruption was caused to members of the public, local businesses and the local community as a result.

Operation Augusta was launched by the Met to bring those involved in the disorder to justice.

Detective Sergeant Matt Hearing, who led the Operation Augusta team, said: “This investigation proved extremely challenging with hundreds of hours of CCTV, video and Body Worn Video to examine. However, such was the weight of evidence brought against those charged, that all pleaded guilty.

“Peaceful protest plays an important role in our society. However, the actions of some involved in this demonstration showed a contempt both for the law and the police. Officers that day were there to ensure the safety of all those taking part, yet were met with abuse and violence.”

Robert Hutchinson, prosecutor from the London CPS complex casework unit, said: “The terrifying disorder wreaked by these individuals in the heart of London on 9 June 2018, was inexcusable. Protestors set out to intimidate and hurt police, injuring more than 20 officers who were protecting the public and tourists in Central London on the day of Trooping of the Colour, and who should have been able to go about their duties without fear of violence.

“This was a complex case and has involved exceptionally close liaison with the police from an early stage to determine appropriate charges that reflected the seriousness of their crimes. The strong case we built ultimately left the defendants with no choice but to plead guilty.

“The sentences passed today should serve as a warning that those who direct violence towards police and act in this way will face prosecution and potentially prison.”

+ The following are due to be sentenced on Monday, 30 September:

– Mark Ransome, 25 (07.02.94) of Romford Road, Romford.
– James Thomas, 28 (24.10.90) of Priory View Road, Burton, Christchurch, Dorset.
– Max Millay-Hammet, 22 (09.05.97) of Wenlock Road, N1.
– Charles Haig, 24 (22.03.95) of East Street, Seaford, East Sussex.
– John Cummings, 49 (16.09.70) of Hunters Hall Road, Dagenham, Essex.
– Mitchell Fenwick, 21 (17.07.98) of Glebelands, Haverfordwest, Dyfed.
Met Police

A Tommy Robinson supporter cried as she was spared jail over her role in an afternoon of “disgraceful violence” against police.

Kate Beveridge, a single mother of two and primary school cook, avoided immediate jail after she joined a violent pro-Robinson demonstration in which cans, traffic cones and various makeshift missiles were thrown.

She was handed a 15-month jail term, suspended for 18 months, and spared immediate custody because she is the sole carer of her children.

Beveridge, who was the only one of five defendants to be spared jail, was reportedly drunk when she threw a one litre plastic drinks bottle at police during the protest in central London in June 2018.

Three of the other defendants were jailed for violent disorder, while the youngest member of the group was sent to a young offenders institution.

At the sentencing, Judge Deborah Taylor told Beveridge: “You have two children aged 14 and two for whom you are the sole carer.

“You should think what sort of example you are setting your own children and the children at the primary school by the actions you carried out that day.”

The 35-year-old, from Singleton in Lancashire, wiped away tears as the judge told her she would be spared immediate custody at Southwark Crown Court.

Her counsel, Sheryl Nwosu, said: “She expresses not only sorrow but embarrassment and shame. She does not align herself with what went on that day.

“She acted on intoxicated impulse … this is a one-off.”

Danny Grealey, Keith O’Sullivan and Robert Sandford were jailed for violent disorder, while Andrew McLean, who is 20 years old, was sent to a young offenders institution.

The court heard how police were “overrun” by the disorder in the capital in June when thousands of people packed into Whitehall to demand Robinson’s release.

The former EDL leader was in prison for contempt of court at the time of the demonstration.

Prosecutor Aska Fujita said: “It turned ugly. The police have been constantly abused, missiles were thrown at them, they have been punched, kicked and had barriers thrown at them.

“The number of defendants does not reflect the actual occurrence of violence – police have tried incredibly hard to identify the people involved.

“However, out of a crowd of hundreds and thousands, it is impossible to identify everyone.”

She added that more than 20 police officers were injured, although there were no injuries more serious than cuts and bruises.

However, Ms Fujita insisted that this was only “due to sheer coincidence.”

“Each of the defendants were involved in serious acts of violence, including using weapons that could have caused serious injury,” she said.

The five defendants were the first of 14 defendants due to be sentenced for violent disorder during three hearings at the court.

Robinson was released from Belmarsh prison in southeast London a fortnight ago, two months into a nine-month sentence for contempt of court.

The Independent