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James Healy given prison term for ‘frenzied and unprovoked attack’ outside London pub

A Chelsea football fan was jailed for two years and eight months for committing an aggravated assault on the Guardian columnist Owen Jones with a “karate kick to his lower back”, motivated by hostility to the writer’s leftwing and LGBT politics.

James Healy, 40, from Portsmouth, was sentenced at Snaresbrook crown court for “a frenzied and wholly unprovoked attack” last August that took place in the street late at night after Jones had been out celebrating his birthday.

Recorder Anne Studd, the presiding judge, said there were “very significant aggravating factors” as she handed down the sentence to Healy at the high end of the range available.

The judge described Healy as “a man holding extreme rightwing opinions who attacked a victim who did no more than hold opinions on which the defendant did not agree”.

Two other men, Liam Tracey, 35, from Camden, London, and Charlie Ambrose, 31, from Brighton, were also sentenced for their part in the assault.

Tracey and Ambrose received an eight-month sentence, suspended for two years. Both had pleaded guilty last December although the conclusion of the case was delayed for several months due to the coronavirus crisis.

The court heard how Jones was attacked from behind by Healy at 2am outside the Lexington pub in King’s Cross, north London, having recognised the journalist and commentator in the pub earlier in the evening.

Jones was knocked to the ground and injured after being struck, and was “spared further blows only by the actions of the friends who were with him”, Studd said as she read out her judgment. A general fight then broke out involving Healy and the other two defendants.

In a victim impact statement, Jones said that while the injuries he sustained healed rapidly, there had been a longer lasting psychological impact. Despite previously being on the receiving end of online abuse, it was the first time he had been subject to a physical attack.

Philip McGhee, prosecuting, said Jones believed it was “harder to ignore online threats now” and that “he no longer feels he can walk alone, and will take taxis even for short distances as on account of this attack he feels at risk”.

The three men were not detained in the immediate aftermath of the fight in the street, but the court heard that they were arrested after they were recognised from CCTV footage by officers familiar with Chelsea supporters known to police.

Healy had at least nine convictions relating to football hooliganism stretching back to 1998. A search of his property after his arrest revealed a collection of far-right hooligan memorabilia, loosely connected with the Chelsea Youth Firm.

McGhee, prosecuting, said Healy possessed “a greeting card, which bore Nazi far-right extremist terror symbols, including those associated with the far-right Combat 18 group, one of whose tenets is ‘kill all queers’”.

Also discovered was a Nazi SS flag bearing a “totenkopf” death’s head skull symbol plus “a number of pins of badges”, including a circular pin badge with the “lead the way” and “whatever it takes” motto of Combat 18 and a badge that said “Chelsea FC no asylum seekers”.

Healy had pleaded guilty to the charges of actual body harm and affray but a special fact-finding hearing in January ruled that the “wholly unprovoked assault” was aggravated because Jones had been targeted because of his pro-LGBT and leftwing political views. Healy was also sentenced for 10 months for affray, served concurrently.

The judge concluded Jones had been identified in the pub by Healy or one of his friends earlier in the evening and that they had identified him as a target for attack.

CCTV footage showed Healy appearing to motion to friends outside the pub that Jones was leaving – and that he then followed him to launch “a running kick” on Jones in the small hours.

After the sentencing, Jones said: “Prison isn’t a solution to far right extremism: it’s a political problem which can’t be magicked away by custodial sentences. But if any good comes of this case, it’s to focus attention on a far-right threat which poses a violent threat to minorities and the left, including to those who have suffered far more than me”.

A Guardian spokesperson said: “We are pleased that the police and courts have now dealt with those responsible for this terrible attack. Assaults on journalists or political activists have no place in a decent society.”

The Guardian

Jacek Tchorzewski had links to Sonnenkrieg Division terrorist group



A neo-Nazi has been jailed for possessing indecent images of children and extreme pornography.

Jacek Tchorzewski, who had links to the Sonnenkrieg Division terrorist group, was imprisoned for terror offences last year.

But the 19-year-old has now been sentenced at Harrow Crown Court for downloading videos, photos and animations depicting child rape, incest and “sexual interference with a corpse”.

The court heard the material was discovered after police stopped Tchorzewski at Luton Airport on 20 February last year.

He had been about to board a flight back to Poland after visiting his mother, who lives in High Wycombe.

Prosecutor Margia Mostafa said officers who seized his phone and two laptops discovered “evidence of child pornography” as well as far-right terrorist material.

“The contents of the images are fairly distressing,” she added, saying there were four videos in the most serious category showing the rape of boys and girls as young as five.

Ms Mostafa said the victims shown included boys and girls, adding: “They have been clearly groomed and there is suggestion that these children are forced to smile at the camera.”

Tchorzewski also admitted possessing more than 500 images of extreme pornography, which mainly related to animations of characters from a popular children’s cartoon having incestuous sex.

He pleaded guilty to three counts of possessing indecent images of children and one of extreme pornography, including material depicting “an act which involved sexual interference with a corpse”.

Judge Anupama Thompson sentenced Tchorzewski to eight months’ imprisonment, which will run concurrently to his previous four-year sentence for possessing neo-Nazi terror manuals.

“It seems to me that as far as the public interest is concerned, there is nothing to be achieved from extending your sentence further from the one you are currently serving,” the judge added.

“Considerable time has passed since you were originally arrested and had things should be done as they should have, these would have been dealt with by the Central Criminal Court [during the terror case].”

Tchorzewski, wearing a blue-T-shirt and glasses, with a long hair and beard, remained impassive as he was sentenced on Wednesday.

The court heard that probation workers had been “trying to engage the defendant generally on his offending behaviour, but have not had a great deal of success”.

Robert English, for the defence, said Tchorzewski told him the images were downloaded when he was between 15 and 17.

“I asked him why he had those images and he says he was younger then, he had a curiosity, an interest,” he told the court.

“He has no interest now and it’s just something that occurred earlier in his life.”

Mr English said Tchorzewski was originally from Poland and had a “disjointed upbringing” moving between his father in that country and mother in the UK.

A pre-sentence report drawn up after his terror conviction said he was “self-contained and isolated”, had been bullied and struggled to form friendships and communicate.

Mr English said Tchorzewski was suspected to have autism spectrum disorder but there had been no formal diagnosis, adding: “These various traits … resulted in a lot of time spent alone on the internet.”

In September, he was jailed after pleading guilty to 10 counts of possessing documents useful to terrorists.

That court case heard that he also had Satanist literature depicting rape and paedophilia at his home.

The Metropolitan Police said Tchorzewski had “amassed a plethora of guides on terrorism, bomb making and gun production”.

He was friends with Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, a leading member of the banned neo-Nazi terrorist group Sonnekrieg Division.

Dunn-Koczorowski, who was a previous member of National Action, was jailed for terror offences last year after inciting terror attacks on targets including Prince Harry.

Co-defendant Michal Szewczuk, also a Polish national, ran a blog that encouraged the rape and torture of opponents, including small children, and Dunn-Koczorowski wrote about decapitating babies.

Tchorzewski’s phone contained several pictures of him and Dunn-Koczorowski posing with a Nazi flag and performing Hitler salutes.

Police found Tchorzewski had an array of extreme right-wing material praising Hitler, neo-Nazism, Satanism, antisemitism and calling for genocide.

At the time commander Richard Smith, head of the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command, said: “Tchorzewski’s obsession with neo-Nazism, terrorism and weaponry was not harmless curiosity.”

The Independent

Andrew Howard, 51, of Newton Heath, will be sentenced next month after pleading guilty to racially aggravated harassment

A man who left racist signs directed at his neighbour telling him ‘we don’t want Muslims here’, was found to be in possession of Nazi memorabilia.

Andrew Howard, 51, left the offensive signs and markings near to the man’s house after he moved in nearby.

Some of the messages read ‘you Muslim scum’ and ‘go back to your own country’, Manchester Magistrates Court heard.

Howard, of Newton Heath, was then found to have Nazi memorabilia around his house including pictures of Adolf Hitler and swastikas.

Today, Howard pleaded guilty to one charge of racially aggravated harassment.

He will be sentenced next month following the preparation of pre-sentence reports.

Briefly outlining the facts of the case, prosecutor Martha Dowd said the matter went back to April last year when the man moved in near to Howard, shortly before the incident took place.

“When he moved in he found a number of graffiti markings and signs which were racist in nature, such as ‘We don’t want Muslims here’, “You Muslim scum’ and ‘Go back to your own country’.”

“Following a search of the defendant’s property, officers found Nazi memorabilia, photographs of Hitler, confederate flags and swastikas.”

Howard was said to have no previous convictions.

In mitigation, his defence lawyer Karl Benson said: “The matters go back to 2019, he has lost his good character and he has never been before the court before.

“There is a significant amount of matters he has discussed with me that I think would be best addressed in a full probation report.

“I do believe a report would make a difference to the sentencing of the defendant.

“He is upset in regards to his actions.

“He tells me he has PTSD following his time in the army.

“I believe that to pull these strings would allow the court to understand what makes the defendant tick and how he can be rehabilitated.

“He could be facing a custodial sentence, so I do believe a report would impact the sentencing of the court.”

Manchester Evening News

A man has been jailed for racially abusing a mother as she walked to a fete with her two young children in Saffron Walden.

Terry Ralph, 60, was sentenced to 30 months for racial abuse at Chelmsford Crown Court. He was also sentenced for offences of burglary and failing to provide a specimen, which took place in other counties.

Ralph, of Howard de Walden Way, Newmarket, received convictions for breaching a suspended prison sentence and failing to appear at court. He has been banned from driving for 61 months.

The court was told last Wednesday (June 17) that at around 2pm on Sunday May 5, 2019, a woman visited a fete with her children and husband when she was approached by Ralph, who targeted her because of her appearance.

The racist was confronted by the woman’s husband and Essex Police officers arrived at the scene. Ralph made further comments which were captured on a body-worn camera.

Ralph failed to provide a specimen for police in Newmarket on August 19 last year and was arrested for a burglary at Boots in Cambridge on April 22 this year.

Investigating officer PC Daniel Ricketts, of Uttlesford’s local policing team, said: “Ralph targeted a woman and went out of his way to racially abuse her while she was visiting a fete with her two children and her husband.

“He has shown no remorse, and he was aggressive and unco-operative when he was being questioned that day.

“He intended to cause harassment to a family who were innocently out for the day.

“Ralph has also been sent to prison for other serious offences investigated by our policing partners – where he has time to consider his actions.”

Bishops Stortford Independent

He was one of three Teesside men arrested as the Met Police swooped on Wednesday, following violent clashes with police in Parliament Square

A Teesside man will face a crown court judge to be sentenced after taking part in a London demonstration which saw police officers attacked.

Three men in our region were arrested as the Met Police swooped in the early hours of Wednesday morning, after the violent protests in Parliament Square on June 13.

Two men from Middlesbrough, aged 44 and 40, were arrested on suspicion of violent disorder linked to the demonstration and have been released under investigation while inquiries continue.

But a third, Jamie Dewing, was charged and appeared from custody at Teesside Magistrates’ Court on Thursday morning.

The 31-year-old, of Wharton Place, Boosbeck, indicated a guilty plea to two charges – violent disorder and assault by beating of an emergency worker.

Dewing has been remanded in custody until he appears at Teesside Crown Court for sentence, at a date to be fixed.

Thousands marched on Parliament Square on June 13 as debate about historical monuments intensified, in the wake of a statue of slave trader Edward Colston being pulled down in Bristol during an earlier Black Lives Matter protest.

A statue of Winston Churchill in London was boarded up before the demonstration.

After the demo, Prime Minister Boris Johnson condemned the actions on display after officers were seen being punched and kicked.

And Andrew Banks, 28, of Stansted, Essex, has already been jailed after being photographed urinating at the Westminster memorial dedicated to PC Keith Palmer, during the protests.

PC Palmer, 48, was stabbed while on duty during the Westminster terror attack in March 2017.

The Met Police also confirmed on Wednesday that two London men, one aged 40 from Lewisham and another, aged 58 from Hammersmith and Fulham, were arrested in the early hours.

Since Saturday, six other men have been arrested on suspicion of violent disorder linked to the protests and released under police investigation, as inquiries continue.

The Met Police says it has arrested 258 after disorder at a number of gatherings across the capital, including an unlicensed party in Brixton.

Commander Bas Javid, from the Metropolitan Police Service, said: “When London witnessed the frankly unacceptable levels of violence during recent protests we said those actions would have consequences.

“During clashes with police, a small minority targeted officers with racial abuse or violence – pelting them with bottles, rocks or other items… it was deeply frustrating seeing them being so senselessly assaulted.”

The Gazette

A Millwall fan dubbed the ‘Lion of London Bridge’ after he fought off Islamic terrorists has been given a 21-day curfew for possessing amphetamines.

Roy Larner, 50, was repeatedly stabbed by Jihadis who killed eight and injured 48 others in London Bridge and Borough Market on 3 June 2017.

He famously roared “f**k you, I’m Millwall” as he fought with the killers.

But Larner was caught with two golf-ball sized packages of amphetamines when searched at Newington Butts in Elephant and Castle on January 21.

He was given a 21-day home curfew between 8pm and 6am as part of a community order for possession of the drugs.

Larner has suffered from PTSD and insomnia since he was stabbed in the terrorist attack, Croydon Magistrates’ Court heard.

District Judge Nigel McClean said: “This offence was aggravated by the fact that there was a more serious quantity involved.

“I’m going to make a stand alone community order of a 21-day curfew, you will be required to be at home from 8pm to 6am daily.”

Larner was spared jail in 2018 after a video emerged of him spitting at a black photographer and shouting abuse in Elephant and Castle.

The Millwall fan then launched into a racist outburst at his local MP’s office in Brixton.

He later admitted racially aggravated common assault and religiously aggravated harassment.

Larner was sentenced to eight weeks, suspended for 12 months, for spitting on the photographer and fined £50 for his abuse at the MP’s office.

He was also banned from visiting his MP’s office for two years.

After the London Bridge attack Larner moved to a caravan site outside Canterbury but was then caught with 230 grams of amphetamine on another occasion and handed a 12-month community order.

Larner was then arrested and taken into custody in March last year after he moved back into his mother’s home.

Larner, of Ledbury Street, Southwark, admitted possession of a class B drug and was sentenced to a 21-day curfew.

Daily Mirror

A stalker entered the private area of a hospital to harass his ex-wife and threatened to burn her house down.


Julian Proctor made his victim’s life a misery by breaching conditions not to contact her “literally hundreds of times.”

Leeds Crown court heard how the 50-year-old stalked his former partner for seven months after the breakdown of their 15-year relationship.

The marriage ended after years of Proctor being violent and controlling towards her.

On one occasion she suffered a fractured wrist as she jumped from a car to get away from him.

Bashir Ahmed, prosecuting, said the defendant has previous convictions for violence towards his wife.

In 2006 he was convicted of battery for breaking her nose.

Three years later, he was convicted of battery for grabbing her by the throat and squeezing until she almost passed out.

In October last year, police removed Proctor from the woman’s flat in Wakefield and arranged for the locks to be changed.

Proctor continued to refuse to accept that the relationship was over

He contacted his former partner on a daily basis by making phone phone calls and sending messages on WhatsApp and Facebook.

The defendant also sent and delivered flowers to her flat and to the hospital in Wakefield where she worked.

Mr Ahmed said Proctor would park outside the hospital and wait for her.

On one occasion he entered the hospital and accessed staff-only areas and her manager had to call security.

Proctor also resorted to blackmail by threatening to self-harm and burn her house down.

He was arrested but continued to stalk the woman while on police bail.

Proctor regularly followed her while she was shopping and even slept in his car outside her home.

He sent the victim messages saying: “I will follow you anywhere.”

On May 8 this year, Proctor sent her photos of him cutting his chest and wrists with a razor.

In his police interview, Procter denied the relationship had ended and said he loved the woman and wanted to talk to her.

He told officers: “Without (the victim) there is no life.”

In a statement to the court, the woman said she now suffers from anxiety and sleep problems.

She said she is always looking over her shoulder in case Procter is there and no longer leaves the house alone, which has affected her relationships.

She also described how she had resorted to sitting on her living room floor in the dark in hope that Proctor would think she was not at home.

Procter, of Drury Lane, Wakefield, pleaded guilty to stalking.

He has previous convictions for dishonesty, vehicle-related offences, making a threat to kill and affray.

Satpal Roth-Sharma, mitigating, said Proctor was abusing alcohol at the time of the offending.

He was jailed for two-and-a-half years.

Judge Simon Batiste told him: “It is clear you had no regard for the wishes of the complainant and the conditions of police bail had no real control of you because you were perfectly willing to breach those conditions literally hundreds of times.”

Wakefield Express

A march steward caused a brain injury to a stranger who he pushed to the ground when violence flared after a city centre protest.

Dean Lawrence, 42, had provided security for the Democratic Football Lads Alliance (DFLA) during their march in Sunderland in September 2018, which was met with counter protesters on the day.

Newcastle Crown Court heard in the hours after the event, some of the attendees went drinking in bars.

Prosecutor Alec Burns told the court two men walking home from the pub, through a park behind Crowtree Leisure Centre, came under attack.

One victim, who had been at the counter-protest and had been involved in “banter” with the DFLA during the event, was punched to the ground and beaten by an unknown attacker.

His friend, who had not been at the march, was pushed to the ground by married dad-of-two Lawrence and left with four areas of intracranial bruising with bleeding on the brain.

Mr Burns told the court: “He pushed the complainant and knocked him to the ground. He had no time to react and wasn’t able to soften the blow and hit the ground with his head, which knocked him unconscious.”

The court heard Lawrence walked away and left his victim on the ground.

His victim spent three days in hospital, with an injury prosecutors said could potentially be fatal, and was unable to drive for seven months after the attack.

He said in an impact statement he was left with painful headaches and when out alone he is always “wondering if i’m going to be attacked again”.

He added: “I don’t think I will ever get over the psychological effect this had on me.

“I am trying to take each day as it comes in the hope that as time goes by it will become easier to deal with.”

Lawrence, of Aintree Close, Catshill, Bromsgrove, West Midlands, admitted causing grievous bodily harm.

Judge Julie Clemitson sentenced him to 20 months behind bars, suspended for two years, with a £2,500 compensation order.

The judge told him: “You left, you walked away, you left him there without checking to see if he was alright.”

Judge Clemitson said Lawrence has since “distanced himself” from the DFLA organisation, has positive references, has never been in trouble before and is remorseful for the attack, which faced delay in being concluded in court.

The judge added that the current public health crisis had influence over her decision to suspend the jail term.

Steven Reed, defending, said Lawrence struggled to accept what he had done in the aftermath of the violence and was “scared”.

Mr Reed said Lawrence had been a steward at the march and had gone to the pub afterwards.

He adde: “In relation to the confrontation in the park, he went there with the intention of preventing a confrontation, not being involved in a confrontation.”

Mr Reed said Lawrence has raised money for charities supporting homelessness and autism and got himself “caught up through naivety”.

Sunderland Echo

A sadistic and predatory homosexual became a serial killer for fun, stabbing four men in murders which left him feeling “at peace”, a court was told yesterday.

Peter Moore’s wardrobe had strong Nazi influences, Alex Carlile, QC, for the prosecution, said at Mold Crown Court in north Wales. He liked to wear black leather when lurking at the meeting places of homosexuals. “The man in black – black thoughts and the blackest of deeds,” Mr Carlile said.

Moore, 50, of Kinmel Bay, Flintshire, admitted during protracted police questioning to more than 17 attacks over 20 years, none of them homicidal.

But in May 1994, his mother died, an event which may have triggered “an extremely ugly change in character”, Mr Carlile said.

Moore, owner of four small cinemas , denies four charges of murder. The killings were carried out during three months beginning in September last year.

Mr Carlile said Moore had met the victims by chance. He expected to be caught after ending his killing spree with the murder of his bank manager.

His first victim, Henry Roberts, 56, coincidentally shared with his killer an enthusiasm for Nazi paraphernalia. Mr Roberts tried to protest he was not Jewish as Moore launched 27 blows with a combat knife he had bought a few days earlier for pounds 25. The body was left in the yard outside Mr Roberts’ isolated home near Valley, Anglesey.

A month later, Keith Randles, 49, a security manager, opened the door of his caravan late at night on a construction site near Mona, Anglesey, to be attacked by Moore, who stabbed him 12 times. Moore later told police that when Mr Randles asked why he was being attacked, he was told it was for fun. “He looked nonplussed,” Moore allegedly had said.

In December, Tony Davies, 35, drove to Pensarn Beach near Colwyn Bay, a meeting place near his home for homosexual men. Moore told detectives that he had been cruising the area when he saw Mr Davies expose himself.

Mr Carlile said Moore killed him with six stabs. Blood found on the beach was matched by DNA profile to Moore. The wound had been caused as Mr Davies fought for his life.

When police searched Moore’s home, where he lived alone, they found property belonging to his victims in the house and in a garden pond. A knife bearing traces of the blood of a number of men was found in a bag belonging to Moore. It was similar to the blade scientific evidence would claim was used on the four men.

Moore’s other victim was killed between October and December 1995. Edward Carthy, 28, from Birkenhead, was a drug addict and drunk whom Moore met in a homosexual bar in Liverpool, Mr Carlile said. The pair drove to North Wales, Mr Carthy drunk but trying to escape from Moore’s van. He was stabbed to death and buried in dense forest near Ruthin. Moore later drew police a diagram locating the body, Mr Carlisle said.

He was a dominant homosexual, a violent and predatory sadist who drew sexual satisfaction from causing pain and suffering.

By day he appeared only to be an unremarkable businessman, Mr Carlile said. But he added: “The nocturnal Peter Moore was one of the most dangerous people ever to have set foot in Wales.”

The Independent

From 1996

Further info here

A man has been jailed for urinating at the Westminster memorial dedicated to PC Keith Palmer.

Andrew Banks, 28, of Stansted, Essex, was photographed during Saturday’s right-wing protests in London.

He was sentenced to 14 days in custody, after pleading guilty to outraging public decency at Westminster Magistrates’ Court.

PC Palmer, 48, was stabbed while on duty during the Westminster attack on 22 March 2017.

He was one of five people murdered by Khalid Masood.

The image of Banks was widely shared on social media on Saturday as violent clashes between far-right protesters and police took place in central London.

The memorial for PC Keith Palmer was unveiled outside Parliament in 2018

Banks, a Tottenham Hotspur fan, said he had travelled to central London with other football supporters to “protect statues”, but admitted he did not know which statues.

He was said to have drunk 16 pints during Friday night into Saturday morning, and had not been to sleep.

Banks contacted police after being confronted by his father, the court heard.

Jailing Banks, Chief Magistrate Emma Arbuthnot said: “I accept you were drunk and did not know where you were urinating.

“Your explanation is you had 16 pints to drink, you hadn’t been to bed, and a group of football supporters were coming up to protect the monuments.

“The irony is rather than protecting the monuments, you almost urinated on one. That was more by luck than judgment.”

His counsel Stuart Harris said his client was “ashamed by his action”, and had mental health issues.

The act was widely condemned at the time by politicians including MP Tobias Ellwood, who gave first aid to PC Palmer as he lay dying in the grounds of Parliament.

Met Police Cdr Bas Javid said: “Keith Palmer was a brave police officer and the memorial stands testament to his courage.

“Banks’ actions, in stark contrast, were unpleasant and extremely upsetting to PC Palmer’s family and colleagues.

“While I note that Banks did not act with intent, I welcome the sentence handed down by the court for his thoughtless and distasteful behaviour.”

BBC News