Dean Morrice: Former Ukip member found guilty of neo-Nazi terror offences

Former British Army driver had explosive substances, crossbows and 3D gun parts at home

A former Ukip member has been found guilty of neo-Nazi terror offences and explosive charges.

Dean Morrice, 34, had explosive substances at his home near Bristol, as well as crossbows and parts for a 3D-printed gun.

His trial at Kingston Crown Court heard that he also ran a social media channel which encouraged far-right terror attacks.

Morrice told the court that he developed an interest in politics in around 2008 or 2009 and was initially a “fan” of Nigel Farage, but then became more extreme.

He said he joined Ukip because he supported its views and was a member until “a few years ago”.

Morrice told jurors that a Facebook group dedicated to “King Nigel [Farage]” was his first engagement with politics online, before he became involved in neo-Nazi chat groups.

He denied all charges but was convicted of eight terror offences and two counts of possessing explosive substances on Thursday.

After 11 hours of deliberations, jurors reached unanimous verdicts on eight charges and found Morrice guilty of having materials to make incendiary thermite and possessing a terrorist document relating to weapons by a majority of 10 to two.

He was convicted of two counts of possessing explosive substances without a lawful purpose, one of encouraging terrorism, three of disseminating terrorist publications and four of possessing documents useful to a terrorist.

The defendant, wearing a dark suit and tie, stood impassively in the dock as the verdicts were read out.

Judge Peter Lodder QC remanded him in custody ahead of a sentencing hearing on Monday.

Morrice, who previously worked as a driver for the British Army, had collected items including crossbows, a tactical vest, skull mask, far-right stickers and a badge reading “ban Islam”.

Prosecutors said he held up the Christchurch mosque shooter Brenton Tarrant “as an example to follow”, and filmed himself “strumming along” with footage of the March 2019 massacre.

Morrice told jurors that a Facebook group dedicated to “King Nigel [Farage]” was his first engagement with politics online, before he became involved in neo-Nazi chat groups.

He denied all charges but was convicted of eight terror offences and two counts of possessing explosive substances on Thursday.

After 11 hours of deliberations, jurors reached unanimous verdicts on eight charges and found Morrice guilty of having materials to make incendiary thermite and possessing a terrorist document relating to weapons by a majority of 10 to two.

He was convicted of two counts of possessing explosive substances without a lawful purpose, one of encouraging terrorism, three of disseminating terrorist publications and four of possessing documents useful to a terrorist.

The defendant, wearing a dark suit and tie, stood impassively in the dock as the verdicts were read out.

Judge Peter Lodder QC remanded him in custody ahead of a sentencing hearing on Monday.

Morrice, who previously worked as a driver for the British Army, had collected items including crossbows, a tactical vest, skull mask, far-right stickers and a badge reading “ban Islam”.

Prosecutors said he held up the Christchurch mosque shooter Brenton Tarrant “as an example to follow”, and filmed himself “strumming along” with footage of the March 2019 massacre.

The Independent

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