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A KEYLESS reveller is starting 12 months in jail after he tried to get back into his home using a ladder at 2.40am.

An eye-witness thought Andrew John Waterson was a burglar and summoned police to Skelton Court, Clifton, said prosecutor David Garnet,t at York Crown Court.

The 39-year-old, with 105 previous convictions, reacted so badly to the police presence, it took five officers to bring the kicking, screaming man under control.

“You have pleaded guilty yet again to a series of offences that reflect your complete disregard for any ideas in our society for good behaviour,” Judge Jonathan Durham Hall QC told Waterson.

“There is nothing that can be sensibly done by the defence to stop this court from doing its duty. Some court has to.”

He jailed him for three months, plus nine months previously suspended for benefit fraud.

Waterson pleaded guilty to a public order offence and causing criminal damage to a police cell.

For Waterson, Iftikhar Ahmed said his client did not have his house key with him, but had an arrangement to wake up a neighbour who did have a key when he returned from his night out.

“This is something he has adopted in the past,” said Mr Ahmed. “Unfortunately for him, police were called.

“He tried to explain to the police exactly what he was doing, but he felt that the police officers didn’t want to hear anything from him.”

The court was told Waterson regretted his actions.

He had been out with friends for the first time since his 15-year-old daughter had come to live with him and had got drunk. His parental responsibilities had led to him changing his lifestyle and he had got part-time work.

“I have rarely seen a record so bad,” Judge Durham-Hall said.

“I have rarely seen someone treated with such leniency over the years.”

Waterson’s 105 previous convictions included eight for public order offences and ten for damaging property.

He got the suspended sentence at York Crown Court in November for claiming £11,790 in benefit while doing six jobs at different times over a three-year period.

Benefit fraudster

Andrew Waterson claimed a disability living allowance, income support, housing benefit and council tax benefit on the grounds that he had an injured arm that stopped him working.

But the car valet still managed to do six jobs at different times between May 2002 and 2005, thus netting £11,790 of taxpayers’ money he was not entitled to, York Crown Court heard in November.

Defence barrister David Dixon said Waterson had needed the money to support his family and towards the end of the period had been helping his partner fund her drug habit.

The Recorder of York, Judge Stephen Ashurst decided the five benefit offences Waterson admitted, plus 273 similar offences taken into consideration, merited a nine-month prison sentence.

He suspended the sentence because jailing him could mean Waterson’s teenage daughter would have to go into care and because the Department of Work and Pensions had waited 18 months before prosecuting him.

However, once Waterson admitted another offence committed during the two-year suspension period, another judge could jail him – and did.

York Press

From 2008

A MAN has been told to keep his bulldog muzzled after it attacked a spaniel in the Coppergate Centre.

Sam Rogers, prosecuting, said David Tysall and his wife were out shopping with their cocker spaniel Larry when they saw a white and brown dog run up to it, leap on to its back, pin it to the ground and grip the back of its neck.

A group of people, including the attacking dog’s owner, ran up and pulled it off.

Mr Tysall told the owner: “Your dog tried to kill mine.”

Ms Rogers told York magistrates when Mr Tysall said he would phone the police the owner “became quite aggressive towards him, appearing to be drunk. It made the situation worse.”

Andrew John Waterson, of Hardisty Mews, off Leeman Road, York, admitted not keeping his dog under proper control, theft of alcohol, theft of £7.95 of food from the Spar store in Lowther Street on April 8, and obstructing police.

Ms Rogers said in separate incidents on the same day, Waterson had stolen alcohol from the Spar store on Heslington Road and struggled when police arrested him at 9.50pm on Walmgate for aggressive behaviour.

Waterson was ordered to do 12 months’ supervision, including work on controlling his drinking, 100 hours’ unpaid work, to pay £7.95 compensation to the Spar shop in Lowther Street, and to pay £85 prosecution costs. In addition to the muzzle order he was ordered to keep his dog on a lead within the city’s Bar Walls.

His solicitor, Martin Hawes, said Waterson’s dog Tofu had been on a lead in Coppergate Centre on April 27, but it had snapped when it pulled on it.

Tofu was an “Irish breed bull dog”, not a pit bull terrier, and was very good with people. However, it didn’t get on with other dogs. It had not gone for the front of the spaniel’s neck. He had since bought a muzzle for the dog.

Waterson had depression and drank to cope with emotional family issues he was facing. He had a damaged right arm and the police had caused pain when they grabbed it to arrest him.

York Press

Mark Hawksby

A FORMER soldier from York racially abused a disabled busker in the city centre because he had seen him on TV boasting about claiming benefits, a court has heard.

Mark Hawksby, 34, spotted Viorel Dinu in Coney Street, a week after having seen him on Channel 5’s Gypsies on Benefits and Proud.

Hawksby, of St Mary’s Close in Wigginton, recognised Mr Dinu while he was playing the accordion and rounded on him.

Mr Dinu, who has no legs, was sitting on a skateboard in a shop doorway.

Hawksby claimed there was so much money in his coat by 11.30am that he tripped over it on the pavement.

At York Magistrates Court, Hawksby said: “I had a go at him about being on the programme and what he had said.

“He said he had come to Britain purposely because it was a soft touch.

“I said ‘You’re out of order for going on this TV programme and saying you can milk the system’.”

The court heard Hawksby threw the coat into the gutter in Coney Street, scattering the money.

He also grabbed Dinu’s accordion and threw it into the road, saying: “This is English money for English people.”

The court heard a puzzled crowd formed and Hawksby was grabbed by a girl from a hen party, then stormed off, yelling: “I will see you do not busk in York again.”

Dinu, who travels the country telling people he lost his legs as a child when he was run over by a train, did not report the incident and did not co-operate with police who investigated after complaints from the public.

Hawksby was arrested after his picture was taken by University of York Professor Nick Brown, who shared the images with North Yorkshire Police on Facebook.

Hawksby told officers: “He is not even from York. It costs 23 to 25 quid on the train so he must be earning some right money busking.”

Hawksby denied racially aggravated threatening behaviour but was convicted.

He was given a four month suspended jail sentence and ordered to pay £100 costs and an £80 surcharge.

Mr Dinu had told the Channel 5 programme that he and other Romanians had come to the UK because it was a “soft touch” the court heard.

The Press

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