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A self-confessed Nazi who called for the genocide of Jewish people has been jailed for three years.

The 22-year-old Lancashire man, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was found guilty in January of two counts of stirring up racial hatred.

Preston Crown Court heard he committed the offences in speeches at far-right gatherings in 2015 and 2016.

Judge Robert Altham said the defendant’s comment had been “intended to mobilise others”.

He said the intent of the man, who was involved with the now banned group National Action, was “clear”.

Judge Altham said: “He seeks to raise street armies, perpetrate violence against Jewish people and ultimately bring about genocide.”

He said they were “not idle comments said in the heat of the moment” and he was “resolute in his original views and withdraws nothing”.

‘Shocking and inflammatory’

The judge described an apology submitted in mitigation as “meaningless” at best, and “dishonest” at worst.

He sentenced him to 18 months in prison for each offence, to be served consecutively.

The court heard the defendant had described Jewish people as “parasites” and called for them to be “eradicated” at an event in Yorkshire.

At another demonstration he claimed Britain “took the wrong side” in World War Two.

The court heard the defendant also said: “You can call me a Nazi, you can call me a fascist, that’s what I am.”

Judge Altham said material discovered by police at his home was “as shocking and inflammatory as it is misguided”.

Wayne Jackson, defending, said his client was not making excuses for his behaviour and had been “impressionable in the past”.
BBC News

Mikko Vehvilainen accused of membership of banned neo-Nazi group

 A court sketch of Mikko Vehvilainen, left, and Mark Barrett, centre, on trial at Birmingham Crown Court. (Image: Elizabeth Cook)

A court sketch of Mikko Vehvilainen, left, and Mark Barrett, centre, on trial at Birmingham Crown Court. (Image: Elizabeth Cook)

The “racist” views of an Army trainer and alleged recruiter for banned neo-Nazi group National Action do not make him a criminal, a jury has been told.

The barrister for 33-year-old Lance Corporal Mikko Vehvilainen told jurors on Wednesday it was “not in dispute that he is a racist”.

Pavlos Panayi QC said: “It is not disputed that he has written and said things which the vast majority of people will find utterly repulsive, about black people, Jews, Muslims and lots of other minority groups.

“It is not disputed he has associated with other racists, men and women, from what might be called the Far Right, that might include neo-Nazis, and other different groups of people.”

But he added that while the “groundbreaking case” would test the limits of free speech and freedom of association in Britain, Vehvilainen’s actions were not criminal.

Vehvilainen and fellow Royal Anglian Regiment soldier, 25-year-old Private Mark Barrett are both on trial accused of membership of the far-right organisation, which was banned by the government in December 2016

Also facing the same charge at Birmingham Crown Court is a 23-year-old male who cannot be named for legal reasons, but who was described in court as a “regional leader” for the group.

The jury heard how Vehvilainen had a host lawfully held weapons including “guns, knives and crossbows” which he kept at his Army accommodation in Sennybridge Camp, Powys.

Jurors were also told he had pleaded guilty to unlawfully having a canister of CS spray among those weapons.

Addressing the jury after the prosecution’s opening speech, Mr Panayi said: “In many ways this case is unprecedented because you have heard that National Action was the first far-right group to be banned since the Second World War and this is the first prosecution arising out of that ban.

“It is a groundbreaking case.”

He added: “This case will test the limits of free speech, the freedom to say what you think and the freedom to frighten, offend and discuss.”

The QC said: “You are, in the end, going to have to determine in this case where the boundary lies between L/Cpl Mikko Vehvilainen’s right to speak freely, to think what he chooses to, and associate with others who share his views and where that boundary lies.

“Whether it crosses over into the reaches of criminal law or not.”

Vehvilainen, who is married with children, is also accused of two counts of stirring up racial hatred through posts on the US-based Christogenea.org website, where he used the name NicoChristian.

He has been further charged with possessing a document likely to be of use to terrorists – a copy of white nationalist Anders Breivik’s manifesto.

Counsel for Barrett, of Dhekalia Barracks, Cyprus, where he lived with his wife and children, also told the jury the case was “not about assessing the morality of expressing prejudicial opinions all right-minded people might recoil from”.

Colin Aylott said: “Are the hallmarks of membership truly present in what he did, and how he expressed himself?

“Ask yourself – casual racist of committed fanatic?

“Because that is the issue you have to decide in this case.”

Addressing the court on behalf of the defendant who cannot be named, barrister Christopher Knox claimed National Action “did not exist” as an organisation after it was banned.

Mr Knox said of the 23-year-old: “We will submit to you that he is no terrorist.

“He was involved with National Action and he held views which he well understands you might find really distasteful, but those are views he was, and is, entitled to hold.”

The court heard that the male had made attempts to join the Army.
Birmingham Mail

A self-declared Nazi who called Jewish people “parasites” who should be “eradicated” has been found guilty of stirring up racial hatred.

The 22-year-old man from Lancashire, who cannot be named for legal reasons, committed the offences in speeches at far-right gatherings in 2015 and 2016.

He was involved with the now banned group National Action.

He denied two charges but was found guilty by a jury at Preston Crown Court and will be sentenced at a later date.

Jurors heard that in one speech, the defendant said Britain “took the wrong side” in World War Two by choosing to fight the “National Socialists who were there to remove Jewry from Europe once and for all”.

Referring to the Holocaust – which he claimed during his trial not to believe in – the man had told activists “that’s what the Final Solution was.”

He added that instead “we let these parasites live among us, and they still do” before going on to say “we let these people destroy us, and they are still destroying us now, and we’re pointing fingers at the symptoms and not the disease”.

He added: “You can call me Nazi, you can call me fascist. That is what I am.”

‘Deliberately controversial’

In the other speech, he called for Jews to be “eradicated” and said Nazi leader Adolf Hitler had been wrong to show “mercy to people who did not deserve mercy”.

The man told jurors he was a Nazi and that the law courts were run by Jews, but said that did not mean he hated all Jews.

Giving evidence, he said he was being deliberately controversial to provoke lively debate and shift views further to the right on the political spectrum.

Anti-racism group Hope Not Hate said after the verdict it was “pleased to have provided the impetus and the evidence for this prosecution” adding it had been a “frustrating” process.

BBC News

A BIGOT who was arrested by the North-East counter terrorism police unit after issuing a “call to arms” against Muslims on Facebook has been jailed.

Police found a crossbow and a telescopic sight at Lee John Carver’s home when they investigated his series of anti-Islamic posts on the social media website, York Crown Court heard.

The 44-year-old had posted “there is a civil war coming”, he was an “archery slave” and that he had “arrows aplenty”, the Honorary Recorder of York, Judge Paul Batty QC said.

It was part of “a considerable number of months” of posts that revealed a “deep seated and deep rooted hatred of Islam”.

“It was effectively a call to arms to other like-minded bigots,” he told Carver.

“Bigots, for that is what you are and were, will be ostracised and will be held to account for what they do.”

Carver’s solicitor advocate Graham Parkin said the posts were the work of an “angry young man” who at the time was suffering from depression brought on by the effects of a life-changing motorcycle crash and who lived an introverted life in his house.

He had got the crossbow as an ornament or for use in his garden and had not taken physical action against Muslims.

Carver, of Greenacres Crescent, Selby, near York, pleaded guilty to three charges of stirring up racial hatred by publishing material on Facebook. He was jailed for 27 months.

He was brought to justice after a member of the public spotted his posts and contacted the North-East Police Counter Terrorism Unit (CTU).

Detective Chief Superintendent Clive Wain, head of the North East CTU, said: “Posts like these have the power to influence many vulnerable people and stir up racial hatred.

“As this case shows, it is vital that the public report concerning online material.

“By bringing such postings and websites to the attention of police we can work together with our partners to identify those responsible and put them before the courts.

“Anyone who has concerns regarding online content can report the material anonymously via gov.uk/ACT or call the police in confidence on 0800-789-321.”

Mr Parkin told York Crown Court that Carver’s problems coping with the effects of the crash had led to him being effectively homeless. But since his arrest last year, Carver had begun receiving treatment for his medical difficulties and had got accommodation and work.

Northern Echo

A man who carried out a mock hanging of a life-sized golliwog doll while wearing a Ku Klux Klan costume has pleaded guilty to a charge of stirring up racial hatred.

Christopher Philips
, formerly known as Darren Clifft, 23, from Willenhall, will be sentenced on 19 December.

Wolverhampton Crown Court heard the hanging happened at an event in Wales in March.

He was arrested after he posted three videos of the mock hanging on YouTube.

Philips pleaded not guilty to a second charge of stirring racial hatred, which will remain on file after a request from the prosecution.

BBC News