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VICTIM’S father hits out as right-wing yob is let off with community service and avoids being placed on sex offenders’ register.

FURY erupted after a right-wing yob who groomed a 13-year-old girl online before having sex with her avoided jail and a place on the sex offenders’ register.

A court heard Stephen Payne had sex with the teenager at his home after the youngster made clear to him during Facebook chat that she was under age.

But the 19-year-old was given only a community payback order after he admitted sex with a minor.

The young victim’s furious father yesterday blasted the 100-hour sentence.

He said: “I am absolutely bewildered that something of this severity gets you 100 hours’ community service and no place on the register.

“What exactly is the sex offenders’ register for? You could get a heftier punishment than this for fighting at the football.”

Local MSP Helen Eadie was also appalled by the sentence and has written to Lord Advocate Frank Mulholland to voice her concerns.

Payne – who “likes” the far-right Scottish Defence League on his Facebook page – got into online conversation with his young victim in 2011.

During their chat, she told him she was 14, although she was only 13 at the time.

She later went to his home in Rosyth, Fife, where they had sex in September 2011.

The girl’s parents found out about the incident last April and her mother contacted police, who launched an inquiry.

Payne was subsequently arrested and charged. He pled guilty after his Facebook conversation with the girl was traced.

At Dunfermline Sheriff Court on January 16, Payne admitted having sex with a minor.

But Sheriff Ian Abercrombie QC sentenced him to only a 100-hour community payback order.

The girl’s dad added: “I would like him on the register and everyone in the locality to know what kind of person is at liberty to walk the streets.”

Daily Record

From 2013

A YOUTH worker employed on a fishing project has admitted sending texts of a sexual nature to a young girl.

Alan Thomas Ellis, 43, was employed by the “Get Hooked on Fishing Project” which aims to get vulnerable people involved in the sport.

But a girl, aged under 16, who went on the course and sent him a text message asking when the next one would be held was shocked to receive inappropriate texts from him.

In court they were described as inappropriate and full of sexual comments.

She later told social workers the text conversation was becoming dirty, it scared her, and social services told police.

Ellis of Leighton Court in Connah’s Quay, but formerly of Castle View Caravan Park at Halkyn, admitted sending six text messages which were grossly offensive, indecent, obscene or menacing.

Paul Abraham, defending, told the court: “Through me Mr Ellis wants to express his regret.”

Ellis was placed on an 18-month community order with supervision and £85 costs.

Daily Post

From 2013

A sex offender escaped from a care centre and fled to Spain, shortly after being spotted applying for his first passport, a judge heard.

Twenty-year-old Jordan Goodwin, also known as Jordan Hagan, stuffed pillows under the covers of his bed to give the impression he was sleeping, Wolverhampton Crown Court heard.

Then he forced open a secure window and ran away from the Huntercombe Centre in Underhill Street, Langley, that caters for people with mental health problems, on March 13.

He left a letter of explanation at the home of his partner and flew out of the country, said Mr Andrew Tucker, prosecuting.

He added: “He got to Spain but was arrested pretty quickly.

“A number of weeks earlier he had been seen filling in a passport application form and when asked why came up with some innocuous reason.”

But Judge Amjad Nawaz asked: “What other purpose could there be for a passport?”

The defendant had been made the subject of an indefinite hospital order at Derby Crown Court in 2011 after committing a serious sexual offence at the age of 12, it was said.

A European Arrest Warrant was issued four days after he vanished and, on March 24, he was flown from Madrid to Birmingham.

He was then detained by police at the airport on landing.

Mr Simon Hanns, defending, said: “There was some element of planning but whether the authorities should have been aware of this is another matter.

“He feels that the hospital order is no longer appropriate and he should now be back in society.”

Goodwin admitted escaping from custody and was given six months detention in a Young Offenders Institution.

However, he had already spent more than half the term in custody waiting for the case to be resolved.

That meant he was eligible for immediate release and could be transferred to a secure unit in Northamptonshire to continue his treatment.

Judge Nawaz told him: “You feel you are being dealt with unfairly by still being held on the hospital order but that is a matter for professionals and a tribunal to decide.

“I am keeping the sentence short to allow you to return to this order because that is in the best interest of, not just you, but also the general public.”

Express & Star.

From 2017

Thank to making-of-a-nazi on Twitter

‘I am moments away from constructing bombs and weapons, how exciting,’ boy wrote in diary

A teenage neo-Nazi who planned terror attacks on synagogues and other targets in Durham has been jailed.

The 17-year-old, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was sentenced to six years and eight months in prison after writing a manifesto aiming to inspire other terrorists.

He detailed plans to firebomb synagogues and other buildings as part of what he believed was an upcoming “race war”.

Before being arrested, he wrote that his upcoming 12 weeks of study leave would be “showtime”.

“I think I am moments away from constructing bombs and weapons, how exciting,” a diary entry added.

The boy was convicted of six terror offences, including preparing acts of terrorism, disseminating terrorist publications and possessing material for terrorist purposes.

When he was arrested in March, police found a piece of paper in his pocket containing a message on code that said: “Killing is probably easier than your paranoid mind thinks. You’re just not used to it … good hunting Friday.”

During his arrest, the boy was carrying a second piece of paper containing a drawing of a fellow school pupil being beheaded.

Prosecutors said he had called for the student’s death, and had described how he wanted to violently attack a second pupil – who he thought was gay – as “judgement exacted on the lowest of the low, as deserved”.

Michelle Nelson QC told Manchester Crown Court: “Assaults upon fellow students, who had no place in the new world order, was in line with that; it was something he saw as part of generating race war and chaos.”

After reading Norway shooter Anders Breivik’s manifesto, which called for lone wolf terror attacks to fight the “genocide” of white people, the teenager started drafting his own.

The document was entitled: “Storm 88: A manual for practical sensible guerrilla warfare against the kike [offensive term for Jewish] system in Durham city area, sieg hiel.”

It listed proposed attack targets in Durham, including schools, public transport and council buildings.

Manifestos have also been written by far-right terrorists who carried out attacks including Halle, El Paso and Christchurch.

Writing on the Fascist Forge forum, the teenager claimed a race war was “inevitable”, and called himself an “accelerationist”.

Prosecutors said they had not identified a “particular act or acts” of terrorism that the boy was going to commit, but that he had been preparing for some kind of atrocity since October 2017.

He denied all offences, claiming he had adopted the terrorist persona for “shock value” and did not want to carry out attacks, but was convicted unanimously of all charges in November.

The teenager wrote that an extremist contact had warned him of an imminent police raid a month before his arrest, prompting him to start deleting files from his devices.

At his first appearance at Westminster Magistrates’ Court last April, prosecutor Kristel Pous said: “Between February 10 to 14, he was tipped off by the Fascist Forge network that the police raid was imminent, and he proceeded to delete all his files.”

Chief Magistrate Emma Arbuthnot said she was “very concerned” and asked police to investigate the claim.

A spokeswoman for Counter Terrorism Policing North East said no further evidence was found, adding: “Although there is evidence he did delete a number of files around 14 February, there’s no actual evidence to support the fact he was tipped off or implicating a third party. All the files deleted at that time were recovered.”

The teenager demonstrated a fascination with mass killers including Breivik, the Oklahoma bomber, Columbine shooters and Unabomber.

The court heard that the boy had been an “adherent of a right-wing ideology” since the age of 13, and that his views became more extreme as he immersed himself in fascist websites and forums.

By 2017, he was describing himself as a neo-Nazi and operated a since-deleted Twitter account.

His racist and homophobic tweets drew the attention of police but when he was interviewed in September that year, he claimed they were posted “for a laugh”.

The boy claimed he was not an extremist, but started another Twitter account and continued communicating with contacts, while accessing a “large quantity of extreme right-wing literature”.

The court heard he had steeped himself in antisemitic conspiracy theories and ranted about Jewish school governors, MPs and the press.

In August 2018, he described himself as a “radical national socialist” and follower of Adolf Hitler, saying he had read Mein Kampf and had a photo of the Nazi leader on his phone.

Prosecutors said the boy obtained and shared terror manuals on making explosives and firearms on the Ironmarch and Fascist Forge online forums, but also drew on jihadi propaganda.

He had searched for Isis execution videos and used al-Qaeda literature, and a jihadi guide on making deadly poisons, including ricin.

By November 2018, he had progressed to extreme occult neo-Nazism, which has gained traction in branches of the UK’s banned National Action terrorist group, and voiced support for satanism.

The teenager declared his support for the “siege” ideology, which was started by an American neo-Nazi and advocates the use of terror attacks to trigger a race war and chaos.

“Democracy is very much a dead system; political violence therefore, can only help us,” he wrote. “The white race is being silently genocided, the west is dying.”

Counterterror police have named right-wing extremism as the fastest-growing terror threat to the UK, although Islamists still make up the largest proportion of investigations.

The largest group of people referred to the Prevent counter-extremism programme are individuals with a “mixed, unstable or unclear ideology”, including obsessions with violence and massacres.

Of the 24 terror plots foiled by security services since March 2017, 16 were Islamist and eight were far right.

The Independent

The youngest person to be convicted of planning a terrorist attack in the UK identified potential targets in his hometown, began drafting a “guerrilla warfare” manual and tried to obtain a chemical used in terrorist bombings. But the case also focused on the radicalisation process itself, hearing the 16-year-old’s preparations for an attack involved a deliberate effort to dehumanise himself and become like the “living dead”.

The teenager chronicled his regression in a journal, writing “at one point or another I can look back and see if I was any different.” Aged 14, he noted: “I wasn’t always a fascist, my red pilling process was slower than most”, adding that less than two years earlier he advocated “punk rock ideals and Marxism”.

The trial heard much about his ideology – an amalgam of neo-Nazism, Satanism and misanthropy, allied to the belief that a collapse of civilisation should be “accelerated” through acts of violence and criminality.

He was first interviewed by police in autumn 2017, when his school reported a Twitter account he used to express support for the outlawed British neo-Nazi group National Action and posed for a photo with ex-English Defence League leader, Tommy Robinson.

The boy, who cannot be identified because of his age, promised to close the profile and he spent time with the government de-radicalisation scheme, Prevent. But rather than moderating his behaviour, he set out to immerse himself in extreme right-wing literature and online networks.

“A fascist has an obligation to absorb a lot of words,” he recorded.

His immersion came at a time of exceptional depravity. National Action had been banned in 2016, but had generated several small British spin-offs, some of which sought to imitate the militant American group, Atomwaffen Division.

The origins of this network were in an online neo-Nazi forum, but by the time it closed in 2017 fascists from around the world were already migrating to new platforms. These digital spaces promote an increasingly berserk world view that proclaims hatred of all, worships a pantheon of “saints” comprising various terrorists and murderers, and demands a commitment to the destruction of society through so-called “accelerationism”.

Online channels can gain thousands of followers, all using a shared vocabulary and set of references, although there are disputes over people’s ideological commitment or supernatural beliefs, in which Adolf Hitler is often regarded as a divinity.

Central influences include the American neo-Nazi James Mason, who has been convicted of indecent images offences involving a child, and individuals associated with the occult organisation Order of Nine Angles – described by the prosecution as the “most prominent and recognisable link between Satanism and the extreme right”.

The result is a culture in which deviancy and criminality are encouraged – sexual violence and paedophilia are constant themes – with anything justified as long as it is thought to destabilise society and defy what is characterised as slavish morality.

The Durham teenager absorbed these ideas, reading any recommended books and discussing them in his journal, gradually following the logic of his ideology towards a planned attack. In October 2018, he wrote that earlier phases of his political activities, such as debating with others, had “accomplished nothing” and merely got him into trouble at school.

“And now here I am an accelerationist,” he added.

The boy actively sought to alter himself in line with the texts he read and included the instruction “shed empathy” on a list of things to do. He adopted an online pseudonym, speaking constantly with other neo-Nazis, telling a forum that his Satanic belief system involved programming oneself to lose any feelings of guilt – becoming the living dead in the process.

“I believe there is primal enjoyment to be had in sadism,” he wrote in his journal, stating: “How wonderful it is to be an amoral individual”.

He set his sights on his hometown of Durham, searching for synagogues and compiling a list of local places “worth attacking”. He collected explosives manuals and also tried to secure a dangerous chemical from a fellow extremist in the United States.

When the boy was arrested outside his home in March, detectives found a coded note in his pocket, saying: “Killing is probably easier than your paranoid mind thinks. You’re just not used to it. Most were caught because they got sloppy.”

At trial, the boy denied being a neo-Nazi, saying his writings were an extremist “alter ego” generated by feelings of social isolation and created in order to shock others and find a sense of belonging online. He told jurors his political beliefs were “centre right” and that he had a poster on his bedroom wall signed by Nigel Farage.

Prosecutors said the boy was lying to the jury about the fake “persona” and that his actions were not confined to diaries or the internet. They originally alleged that he sexually touched a child as part of his preparations for an attack, saying it was a deliberate “desensitisation technique”, although claims about his sexual conduct were ruled inadmissible during pre-trial hearings and will now be heard in a youth court.

Teenagers Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski and Michal Szewczuk pleaded guilty to terror offences

According to police, eight terrorist plots inspired by right-wing ideologies have been stopped since March 2017. They say there is a “spectrum” of such ideologies that have the potential to generate violence, with the variant adopted by the Durham defendant regarded as perhaps the most extreme of all.

He is now the fourth teenager to be convicted of terrorism offences in the UK over the past year, in which the same set of influences – accelerationism and Satanism – have been central.

One of the many troubling aspects of this case is that a child traversed the full spectrum of right-wing extremism before he had even left school.

BBC News

The sick and twisted man “kept demanding” more pictures from the schoolgirl

The Gatwick Airport worker asked the teenage girl if she fancied him


A self-confessed “dirty old man” from South Croydon sent a schoolgirl sexually explicit Facebook messages, wanted to know if she was sleeping with boys and asked if she fancied him .

Andrew Rogers, from Wilson Close, which is just off Bartlett Street, started messaging the girl shortly before her 15th birthday.

The 55-year-old, who works at Gatwick Airport, had met the girl once before when she was 10.

Jonathan Rogers, prosecuting, said Rogers promised the girl money or an iPhone, and told her to show how much she wanted them by sending him pictures of herself.

In one exchange, Rogers referred to himself as a “dirty old man” and called her a “dirty schoolgirl.”

He also wanted to know if she was sleeping with boys, whether she fancied him, and whether she had seen “c**k” before.

Mr Rogers said: “It’s clear from these messages he knew exactly how old she was.

“He repeatedly asked her to show him how much she loved him and how much she missed him, by sending him ‘a nice photo.’

“The messages became increasingly concerning.”

The disturbing messages were discovered by the girl’s mum, at their family home in Liverpool, and police were alerted, as reported by our sister site the Liverpool Echo.

Rogers initially denied any wrongdoing.

He appeared at Liverpool Crown Court charged with sexual communication with a child and changed his plea to guilty as his trial was about to get underway.

Jonathan Rosen, defending, admitted Rogers had “a problem which needs to be addressed.”

“He is deeply ashamed and apologetic about his actions,” said Mr Rosen.

The girl’s mum, in her impact statement, said Rogers’ behaviour had had a “devastating effect” on her family.

It had led to the teenager, now 17, self-harming and threatening to commit suicide.

She added: “She should be going out and enjoying herself, instead she’s angry and depressed.”

Balding Rogers – who hung his head throughout most of the proceedings – was jailed for a total of 23 weeks.

He was also given a sexual harm prevention order and put on the sex offenders’ register for seven years.

Judge Denis Watson, QC, said: “The communications via Facebook messaging had an increasingly sexual theme to them.

“You made repeated requests for photos. Although she sent them, you weren’t satisfied with those and kept demanding others.

“I have absolutely no doubt you wanted a sexual pose.

“These were linked to offers by you of providing her with money, a phone, or both.

“Parts of this came close to grooming.”

Speaking afterwards, the girl’s mum said: “I hope this will encourage other young girls to open up and come forward.

“There must be hundreds of kids this has happened to who are too quiet or too frightened to say anything.”

An NSPCC spokesperson said: “Rogers’ predatory targeting of this vulnerable young girl has left her with serious emotional and mental scars which will take significant time to heal.

“The NSPCC works with victims of child abuse and their families to help them work through their trauma and we hope this girl is receiving all appropriate support.

“Rogers’ repulsive behaviour highlights the need for robust legislation to crack down on websites and social media platforms that leave young people exposed to paedophiles. We urge the Government to do all it can to ensure tech firms are held responsible for our children’s safety.”

My London

Thanks to Football Lads & Lasses

A far-right extremist sent messages to the BBC threatening to shoot two broadcasters and made “grossly offensive” racist remarks about Formula 1 driver Lewis Hamilton.

Ian Hargreaves threatened to kill presenter Clive Myrie and Formula 1 commentator Jack Nicholls during a series of vile messages made through the corporation’s complaints system.

A court heard Hargreaves, 66, from Leeds, also made “disturbing references” to the murder of BBC journalist Jill Dando.

Hargreaves sent 27 offensive messages to the BBC over a two-and-a-half year period.

When police launched an investigation and identified Hargreaves as the culprit they found more than 1,000 child sex abuse images on electronic devices seized from his home.

He was also in possession of a lock-knife when he was arrested.

Hargreaves was jailed for 18 months after pleading guilty to two counts of sending malicious communications, possession of an offensive weapon in a public place and possession of indecent images of children.

Hargreaves was also locked up in 2007 after firearms were found in his home when he was arrested for posting a menu with ‘racist words’ written on it through the letterbox of an Indian restaurant.

Anthony Dunn, prosecuting, told Leeds Crown Court how Hargreaves sent the messages to the BBC anonymously via an online complaints form.

The BBC was made aware of the messages by a member of staff from Capita, the organisation which handles complaints on behalf of the corporation.

Mr Dunn said common features of the messages included a preoccupation with Formula 1 racing and the use of “grossly offensive racist language.”

Hargreaves’ complaints included claims that Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton “should not be described as an Englishman.”

The defendant also accused the BBC of being a “left-wing organisation.”

Mr Dunn said: “He threatened to act on those complaints by threatening to shoot a BBC presenter.”

The court heard he made “disturbing references” to the murder of Jill Dando and made threats relating to Clive Myrie and Jack Nicholls.

The prosecutor said both men were given security advice after the messages were reported to police.

In a victim statement to the court, Mr Myrie described how he found the threats “deeply troubling”.

Mr Dunn added: “It was at the forefront of his mind and he felt exposed when travelling to and from work.”

Hargreaves also sent a similar threatening message to the London Evening Standard.

Mr Dunn said: “It is clear the same person sent all of those messages.”

Hargreaves, of Chestnut Avenue, Crossgates, was traced following an investigation by police in West Yorkshire and Northern Ireland.

He had a large lock knife in his pocket when he was arrested outside his home on November 23, 2017.

Hargreaves told officers: “Some b*****ds have threatened me.”

A total of 1, 341 child sexual abuse images were found on devices recovered during a search of the property.

Ben Thomas, mitigating, said Hargreaves did not intend to carry out the threats and did not send them directly to the victims.

Mr Thomas said Hargreaves has previously received treatment in a mental health unit.

Hargreaves was also ordered to sign the sex offender register for seven years.

Describing the content of the messages, Judge Rodney Jameson, QC, said: “They were not only grossly offensive in the sense of expressing, in the crudest imaginable terms, racist views, but they were specifically designed to create anxiety.”

Yorkshire Post

A paedophile from Luton has been jailed for two years and eight months after downloading thousands of indecent images of children.

Carl Tofts, 27, of Harcourt Street, was handed a 32-month prison term at Luton Crown Court on Monday after being convicted of possessing over 2,500 images of children being abused.

Police raided Tofts’ home in June 2016 after receiving intelligence that someone at that address was accessing indecent images of children via the internet.

Tofts was arrested and subsequently released on bail, while officers seized his devices to download and investigate the content.

He was arrested again in January 2017 by Norfolk Police for similar offences and, in November 2018, he was charged with making and distributing indecent images of children and possession of extreme images.

More than 2,500 images and videos ranging from the most serious category A to category C were found on his devices.

Investigating Officer Michela Zasada said: “Owing to a number of obstacles, it has taken us three years to bring Tofts to justice.

“I am pleased that he has received a custodial sentence for his despicable crimes against children.

“Viewing and possessing indecent images of children is by no means a victimless crime. It causes and propagates real harm to the children concerned, as they are abused and exploited in such a vile and appalling way, and people like Tofts share this disgusting abuse online for other individuals to view.

“We are dedicated to tackling offences of this nature, and hope that the custodial sentence Tofts has received today sends a strong message to others who seek gratification by abusing children in this way.”

In addition to the prison term, Tofts also received an indefinite Sexual Harm Prevention Order, with conditions he must follow on his release from prison.

Parents can visit the Parents Protect website, which is run by the Lucy Faithfull Foundation, for lots of useful resources to help prevent online child sexual abuse. It also contains a list of organisations and resources focusing on keeping children safe in the digital world.

The NSPCC Share Aware website also contains advice and tips about how children can keep themselves safe online.

Luton Today

Kyle Davies was also convicted of possession of indecent images

A teenager who was found guilty of planning a mass shooting has been jailed for 16 years.

Kyle Davies, 19, from Gloucester, tried to buy a handgun and ammunition for £1,000 from a dealer on the dark web.

He was found guilty of attempting to possess a Glock 17 pistol and ammunition with intent to endanger life, during a trial in July.

Judge Paul Cook at Taunton Crown Court said Davies “had the intention to endanger life in a shooting event”.

Davies was also convicted of attempting to evade the prohibition on importation of a prohibited weapon, and possession of indecent images.

During the trial at Gloucester Crown Court the jury heard the Columbine school shooters and Anders Breivik in Norway were “poster boys” to Davies.

A package containing the weapon and ammunition Davies had ordered was intercepted in the USA and officers in the UK were tipped off.

The parcel was substituted for a dummy one that was delivered by an undercover officer to his home, where he was arrested.

A search of Davies’ home revealed computer files and notes about mass killers.

He had denied the charges, saying he had bought the weapon to kill himself, yet the court heard he had written out a list of other items he wanted to buy including petrol, a gas mask and body armour.

Davies, who was aged 18 at the time of the offences, had also drawn 77 stickmen to represent the victims of the 2011 explosion and shootings in Norway.

BBC News

Today a jury of seven women and five men rejected Davies’ claim that he intended to kill only himself with the gun

Kyle Davies, 19, who has been convicted of attempting to possess a firearm and ammunition with intent to endanger life following a trial at Gloucester Crown Court

A 19-year-old man who ordered a deadly handgun and ammunition from an American dealer intended to use them to carry out a massacre, a jury at Gloucester Crown Court decided today.

Kyle Davies, of Wotton, Gloucester, wanted the Glock pistol and rounds of ammunition to copy such infamous killers as the 1999 Columbine school gunmen in America and Norwegian Anders Breivik, who shot 69 teenagers dead on a beach in 2011, it was alleged during his two weeks trial.

Today a jury of seven women and five men rejected Davies’ claim that he intended to kill only himself with the gun. They decided that he did have an intent to endanger life with the gun.

Handout photo issued by South West Regional Organised Crime Unit of a Glock pistol and ammunition shown in evidence during the trial of Kyle Davies, 19, who has been convicted of attempting to possess a firearm and ammunition with intent to endanger life following a trial at Gloucester Crown Court

Jurors unanimously convicted Davies of two charges attempting to import the gun and attempting to import five rounds of ammunition with intent to endanger life in June last year.

Davies’ mother, sitting at the back of the court, buried her head in her hands as the jury foreman announced the guilty verdicts.

Judge Paul Cook told Davies: “Clearly you are looking at a significant period of custody but I need to know more about you before I proceed to sentence.

“I need to know the risk you pose to society. Therefore I am ordering psychiatric and probation reports to be prepared on you.”

Sentence was adjourned to a date to be fixed in about two months time.

During Davies’ trial the jury heard details of the ‘manifesto of death’ that Davies had compiled with detailed lists of weapons, explosives and body armour that would be needed for a successful mass killing.

His laptop, mobile phone and a memory stick were found to contain a mass of detail, including timelines, which the prosecution said proved he was planning a mass killing.

The prosecution said he had made ‘poster boys’ of the Columbine killers Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold and also of Norwegian mass killer Anders Breivik.

Davies, however, maintained all his research into the infamous murders was carried out merely because he was interested in the mindset of a mass killer.

Interviewed after his arrest by armed police at his Gloucester home in June last year Davies maintained he wanted the gun just to take his own life. He repeated that in evidence to the jury last week.

The court heard that he ordered the £300 pistol and ammunition via the Dark Web.

When it arrived in the UK it was intercepted by police and a dummy package was made up to look like the original, it was then delivered to Davies at his home by an undercover policeman posing as a deliveryman.

Later, armed police surrounded Davies’ home and arrested him.

In the witness box Davies said he had tried to kill himself when he was 15 but was found by police and taken home.

He told the jury he could see no point in being alive and he was depressed and thought about suicide every day.

He denied being obsessed with the Columbine killers and Anders Breivik and said he was just interested in them because they were relevant to his A level psychology studies.

Judge Cook said he will sentence Davies in about two months time, possibly at Taunton Crown Court.

Gloucester Live