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A Tallahassee man who claimed to lead a white supremacist group was released from jail Thursday.

Jordan Jereb is a free man once again. The 23-year-old was taken into custody after the FBI searched his house in March.

Agents found tactical knives inside. The state said that violated the terms of Jereb’s probation.

Thursday, Jereb changed his plea from denial to admission. In exchange, the state dropped a misdemeanor charge of false report to law enforcement.

Last June, WTXL reported on a group called the Republic of Florida, with Jereb as its self-proclaimed leader.

The group’s mission, as indicated online, is to create a white ethnostate and use armed force if necessary.

Jereb’s attorney, Ethan Way, said his client has never been a danger to society.

“Just based on what the accusations were related to the two military-type knives, as well as the false report, that the amount of time he served in jail, which is about 108 days, really was enough for this,” said Way. “I think the interests of the public are protected by having Mr. Jereb on electronic monitoring, and, at the same time, he gets released from custody.”

Jereb will be tracked with GPS technology during two years of house arrest, followed by a year of probation.

He’s not allowed on social media or to engage with the Republic of Florida’s website. He also can’t be within 500 feet of a school.

Jereb had also claimed the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter had trained with the Republic of Florida at one point, but he later took that back when he was questioned by investigators.

WTXL

HALIFAX — She sat motionless in the wood-panelled, windowless courtroom as the judge delivered the sentence: Life in prison with no chance of parole for a decade.

Lindsay Souvannarath was then led away by sheriffs, returned to the jail cells that have been her home since 2015.

It’s been three years since the Chicago-area woman was arrested at the Halifax airport with a “death suit” and books on serial killers in her luggage.

She was planning a Valentine’s Day shooting rampage, a plot concocted online with a Halifax teen that would have seen them open fire at the Halifax Shopping Centre food court on a busy Saturday in February 2015.

The 26-year-old American pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit murder only after thousands of damning Facebook messages between the conspirators were deemed admissible as evidence in the case.

Nova Scotia Supreme Court Justice Peter Rosinski told the court Friday that Souvannarath continues to pose a threat to public safety.

The judge said she has not expressed remorse for her murderous plot, nor has she renounced her ideological motivations for the conspiracy.

In his decision, he called her prospects for rehabilitation “very questionable” and said she needs to be separated from society until safety concerns can be addressed.

Rosinski said he is satisfied that had the plot not been interrupted by an anonymous tip and the quick actions of local police, the plan would have been carried out.

“Coming upon unsuspecting members of the public at the mall that day, what carnage would they have inflicted with a 16-gauge shotgun with 23 shells; a .308 calibre lever-action rifle with 13 shells; and a knife to finish off the wounded?”

The judge added: “Ms. Souvannarath’s intention was to kill more than the 13 people who suffered that fate at the Columbine High School shooting,” he wrote, referring to her obsession with the massacre in Littleton, Colo.

Her co-conspirator, 19-year-old James Gamble, killed himself as police surrounded his Halifax-area home.

Kate Battan, the lead investigator of the 1999 shooting who wrote a report highlighting parallels between the school shooting and the mall plot, called it “ironic” that Friday’s sentencing took place on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shooting.

She spent a month combing through the private online messages between Souvannarath and Gamble and their plans to mount an attack at a Halifax mall.

“My impression is that they were all in and this was not a joke,” she said in an interview. “At some point this became real, this was going to happen.”

The judge shared that view, telling the court that the “plan had been set in motion” once Souvannarath boarded a plane for Halifax.

The spectre of shooters opening fire in a busy mall threatened thousands of shoppers and workers and unsettled the city for months.

Rosinski cited the explicit intention to create mass panic and undermine the community’s sense of security as an aggravating factor in the sentencing.

“They intended to maximize dead and wounded casualties,” the judge wrote in his 32-page decision.

“That they intended to be mocking, callous and brutal in their treatment of potential victims they encountered is an aggravating factor.”

He said his sentencing was in part shaped by the principles that apply to terrorism offences and is intended to “send a clear message” to those conspiring to kill multiple people.

“Those who choose to pursue such deadly plans will pay a very heavy price,” Rosinski wrote.

Crown attorney Mark Heerema said the sentence serves as a deterrent for similar crimes.

“The court was unequivocal that this kind of conduct here in Canada by an offender who is not claiming to be remorseful or renouncing will never be accepted,” he told reporters outside the courtroom.

The woman from Geneva, a quiet suburb of Chicago, has been ordered to provide a sample of her DNA and will be subjected to a firearms prohibition for 10 years after her release from prison. He gave her credit for three years served in custody, so she will be eligible for parole in seven years.

Although the judge has recommended intensive psychological and psychiatric counselling and treatment, the sentence of life in prison means the 26-year-old could spend the rest of her days behind bars.

A third accomplice — a local man described in court as the “cheerleader” of the plot — was previously sentenced to a decade in jail.

At the sentencing hearing earlier in the week, Rosinski asked Souvannarath if she would like to address the court. She said: “I decline.”

Before delivering his decision Friday, the judge entered letters from Souvannarath’s parents and grandparents as exhibits in the case.

The parents of both Souvannarath and Gamble were in court for the sentencing hearing, but declined to be interviewed.

Souvannarath has been held at the Central Nova Scotia Correctional facility in a Halifax-area industrial park since her arrest. Her lawyer has said she will likely be transferred to a women’s institution in southern Ontario after sentencing.

The judge noted that the college graduate has been called a quiet prisoner who keeps to herself, participates in Books behind Bars, and was enrolled in a humanities course offered by Dalhousie University.

CTV News

Lindsay Souvannarath pleaded guilty last year to conspiracy to commit murder in a plan that involved opening fire at a mall in Halifax

Lindsay Souvannarath arrives at court in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, on 6 March 2015. Photograph: Darren Pittman/Reuters

Lindsay Souvannarath arrives at court in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, on 6 March 2015. Photograph: Darren Pittman/Reuters

An American woman who plotted to go on a Valentine’s Day shooting rampage at a Canadian mall was sentenced to life in prison on Friday with no chance of parole for nearly a decade.

Lindsay Souvannarath of Geneva, Illinois, pleaded guilty last year to conspiracy to commit murder in a plan that involved opening fire at a mall in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 2015.

Justice Peter Rosinski, of the Nova Scotia supreme court, said that Souvannarath is and will remain a threat to society. He said she has not expressed remorse for her plot.

Rosinski also said that if the plan to kill unsuspecting shoppers had not been interrupted by an anonymous tip and the quick actions of local police, it would have been carried out.

Rosinski said his sentence was partly shaped by the principles that apply to terrorism. While he told the court the motivations and intentions in the case are not precisely the same as those related to terrorism activities, he said the crime requires the court to “send a clear message” to those conspiring to kill multiple people that “they will pay a heavy price”.

The judge also gave Souvannarath credit for time served in custody, so she will be eligible for parole in seven years.

Police thwarted the planned attack after receiving an anonymous tip, but Souvannarath had already boarded a plane in Chicago bound for Nova Scotia.

Her co-conspirator, James Gamble, killed himself as police surrounded his Halifax-area home. Souvannarath was arrested at the airport.

A third accomplice – a local man described in court as the “cheerleader” of the plot – was previously sentenced to a decade in jail.

When Rosinski asked Souvannarath if she would like to address the court before sentencing, the 26-year-old said: “I decline.”

Before delivering sections of his decision orally in court on Friday, the judge entered new letters from Souvannarath’s parents and grandparents as exhibits in the case. The parents of both Souvannarath and Gamble were in court for the sentencing.

At the time the plot was being planned, Souvannarath and Gamble were unemployed and lived with their families.

Court documents released say online conversations between Souvannarath and her Canadian friend quickly devolved into a shared admiration for the Columbine killers, mass shootings and their murderous conspiracy to go on the shooting rampage at the Halifax Shopping Centre food court.
The Guardian

Pictures taken during a tour by Brandon Russell in 2015 including at Buckingham Palace

Pictures taken during a tour by Brandon Russell in 2015 including at Buckingham Palace

A jailed American neo-Nazi leader has boasted that he met the banned British fascist group National Action outside Buckingham Palace.

Brandon Russell, who was jailed for five years after police found bomb-making materials in his flat, is a co-founder of Atomwaffen, an extremist network whose young followers have been implicated in a string of murders.

National Action, Britain’s most prominent far-right terrorist group, targets youth, promotes race war and tweeted after the murder of Jo Cox: “Only 649 MPs to go.”

An image on Atomwaffen’s website

An image on Atomwaffen’s website

The discovery of a transatlantic alliance between young Hitler enthusiasts comes days after Mark Rowley, Britain’s most senior counterterrorism officer, warned that violent British white supremacists were starting to make international connections.

Russell used his nickname “Odin” on the neo-Nazi Iron March forum to describe his tour of Britain with National Action in July 2015. He stopped at sensitive locations such as Buckingham Palace where Atomwaffen and National Action members posed with their respective flags. A third flag unfurled there represented Iron March.

National Action’s flag incorporates the symbol of Sir Oswald Mosley’s Union Movement in which his son Max, now a privacy campaigner, was a prominent activist.

Russell took photographs during his British tour of a display cabinet showing Sir Oswald and his fascist propaganda at the Imperial War Museum in London. He posted the images on Iron March. After the party visited the Houses of Parliament, National Action blogged: “It was good to see the faces of the scum leaving the HOP because they’ll be easier to recognise for the day of the rope.”

Russell met members of National Action, including Ben Raymond, its co-founder, just after one of the organisation’s supporters, Zack Davies, had been convicted for trying to behead an Asian dentist in Mold, north Wales.

Atomwaffen, which means “atomic weapon” in German, was formed in 2015 and is estimated to have only 80 members scattered around the United States. The extremist group was co-founded by housemates Russell, now 22, and Devon Arthurs in Tampa, Florida, in 2015. Russell was sentenced to five years in prison in January after police found bomb-making material at their home. Arthurs told authorities that Russell had been planning to blow up a nuclear power plant near Miami.

Police stumbled on Russell’s home-made explosives when they were called to the flat last May after Arthurs, 18, shot dead their housemates Andrew Oneschuk, 18, and Jeremy Himmelman, 22.

Samuel Woodward, 20, a supporter of Atomwaffen, has been arrested over the alleged hate crime murder of Blaze Bernstein, 19, a former classmate who was gay and Jewish, in Orange County, California, in January.

In December, Nicholas Giampa, 17, who was influenced by Atomwaffen’s online literature, allegedly shot dead his girlfriend’s parents in Reston, Virginia, after they convinced her to ditch him for being a neo-Nazi. Atomwaffen was banned this week by YouTube “due to multiple or severe violations of YouTube’s policy prohibiting hate speech”.

Mr Rowley, who is to retire as assistant commissioner of the Met, gave a parting warning on far-Right terror. “It’s a significant part of the threat and it’s growing,” he told LBC, adding that 18 months ago the Home Secretary proscribed National Action as a terrorist organisation. “What that means in the UK is that we have a home-grown neo-Nazi white supremacist organisation with terrorist purposes operating here,” he said. “They also are starting to make connections internationally. That’s a matter of real concern.”

Behind the story

National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation by Amber Rudd, the home secretary, in December 2016 after the murderer of Jo Cox gave its slogan “Death To Traitors, Freedom For Britain” as his name in court.

The research group Hope Not Hate claims the organisation has continued to operate despite being outlawed: “A core of National Action supporters simply ignored the ban and continued as before, moving their organisation underground and communicating clandestinely using a wide array of secure methods. Others decided to set up front organisations to continue the group’s work but circum-venting the law.”

National Action was co-founded in 2014 by Ben Raymond, 28, a former double-glazing salesman from Bognor Regis, and Alex Davies, 21, from Swansea.

Scottish Dawn, a front group created by Raymond, appeared on the streets in Scotland last year but has also now been banned.
The Times