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37-year-old carpenter Matthew Glynn faces life in prison for turning his home into a bomb factory

This is the face of the man who turned his Horfield home into a bomb factory.

Matthew Glynn, 37, appeared at Bristol Crown Court today, October 31 and despite being due to face trial entered five guilty pleas to making an explosive substance between January 1, 2016 and July 24, 2018.

Glynn now faces a maximum of life in prison for his crimes which caused his street of Filton Avenue, Horfield evacuated for two nights running.

Matthew Glynn posted this image of himself on social media

Matthew Glynn posted this image of himself on social media

The bomb squad descended on the area after a member of the public contacted the police and officers swiftly evacuated nearby homes.

Calling in the army disposal experts (EOD), they were able to enter the house and found what they referred to at the time as “suspicious items” at the property.

Glynn was later charged for making four explosive devices which were described in court today.

One was called a bomb, another a tennis ball filled with low explosive, a hand-held device covered in ball-bearings was also found. Emergency services also found a cylindrical-shaped bomb.

Matthew Glynn admitted making bombs at his home in Filton Avenue, Horfield

Matthew Glynn admitted making bombs at his home in Filton Avenue, Horfield

He has also admitted the same charge relating to explosive powder.

Roads were quickly blocked off and an investigation got underway to make the area safe again.

Filton Avenue was then cordoned off from 5pm on July 23, until late that night.

Although the bomb squad had return to the area the next day and evacuate residents for a second night after more suspicious items were found in Glynn’s attic.

Bristol Post

A man has been convicted of having explosives, weapons and ammunition following a joint investigation by police in Hertfordshire and Counter Terrorism officers from the Met and the Eastern Region Special Operations Unit (ERSOU).

Warren Snedden, 44 (05.05.73) of Longcroft Lane, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire was today, Tuesday, 27 March, found guilty at Woolwich Crown Court of having an explosive substance.

Snedden had previously pleaded guilty to a number of other offences including: possession of documents containing information likely to be useful for terrorist purposes; possession of firearms and ammunition; and, production of cannabis.

Police were alerted to a suspicious transaction on an online auction site in July 2017, where a number of chemicals associated with the production of the explosive TATP were purchased. Further enquiries linked the purchases to Snedden.

A search warrant was carried out on 29 September 2017 by Hertfordshire Constabulary at his address in Welwyn Garden City, where officers found the chemicals in Snedden’s bedroom, along with a number of tilt switches, that are often used in the production of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

Police also found component parts of a firearm, an air rifle and over 200 rounds of ammunition – all items Snedden was specifically prohibited from possessing, having previously been convicted of an armed robbery offence in 2001. A small number of cannabis plants were also found growing in his garden.

Snedden’s digital devices were seized and later examined. Detectives found copies of terrorist-related manuals and documents detailing how to make and create home-made ammunition, weapons and explosives.

Snedden was charged and remanded in custody; he appeared at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on 2 October 2017, and his case was subsequently referred on to Woolwich Crown Court for trial.

Commander Clarke Jarrett, Head of the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command, said: “Snedden never gave a full explanation as to what he was planning to do with the array of chemicals, weaponry and ammunition he had stockpiled. What is clear is that what he was doing was putting both himself, his neighbours and the public in great danger.

“This was a joint investigation between the Met’s Counter Terrorism Command and colleagues from Hertfordshire Constabulary, as well officers from ERSOU’s counter terrorism policing unit. The excellent work across all three has led to a number of dangerous components and weapons being taken out of circulation.

“The case is also a further reminder of the need to be ever-vigilant and I would urge anyone who sees any suspicious activity or behaviour to ACT and report it to police.”

Any suspicious behaviour or activity can be reported via the online tool at: http://gov.uk/ACT or by calling the Anti-Terrorist Hotline on 0800 789 321.

Detective Superintendent Glen Channer, Head of Counter Terrorism Policing for ERSOU, said: “Although we may never understand why Snedden stockpiled these items and was viewing such material, there is no doubt that he posed a very real threat to society.

“This case was a great example of agencies working together in order to prevent someone from causing harm, and removing dangerous weapons and chemicals from circulation.

“Last week saw the launch of the new Action Counter Terrorism campaign which urges people to be vigilant to suspicious activity such as the ordering of illegal firearms or the gathering of chemical materials so this is a timely reminder for people to be alert and report anything they find concerning.”

Snedden was convicted of the following offences:

Two counts of having an explosive substance; two counts of possession of a prohibited weapon; two counts of possession of a firearm without a certificate; possession of ammunition without a certificate; possession of ammunition when prohibited; possession of a firearm by a person previously convicted of crime; three counts of possession of a document containing information useful for terrorist purposes; production of cannabis.

Met Police

Terence Gavan pleaded guilty to 22 charges

Terence Gavan pleaded guilty to 22 charges



A man who admitted making nail bombs at his West Yorkshire home has been jailed for 11 years.

Terence Gavan, 38, who the Old Bailey heard showed a strong hostility towards immigrants, was arrested by police in a raid at his home in May 2009.

The bus driver’s arsenal of weapons and explosives included home-made shotguns, pen guns and pistols.

Gavan, from Batley, also pleaded guilty to six counts of having or collecting documents useful in terrorism.

Sentencing Gavan, Mr Justice Calvert-Smith said his case was “unique” because of his long and persistent manufacture of guns and explosives.

Gavan, who the court heard was a former member of the BNP, pleaded guilty to 22 charges at Woolwich Crown Court in November.

Police discovered 12 firearms and 54 improvised explosive devices, which included nail bombs and a booby-trapped cigarette packet, at the home Gavan shared with his mother.

He told detectives he had “a fascination with things that go bang”, the Old Bailey heard.

After the case, head of the North East Counter Terrorism Unit Det Ch Supt David Buxton said Gavan posed a significant risk to public safety.

“Gavan was an extremely dangerous and unpredictable individual,” he said.

“The sheer volume of home-made firearms and grenades found in his bedroom exposed his obsession with weapons and explosives.

“However, he was not simply a harmless enthusiast.

“Gavan used his extensive knowledge to manufacture and accumulate devices capable of causing significant injury or harm.”

A BNP spokesman would not comment on whether Gavan had been a member of the party.

But he told BBC News that Gavan’s offences were “serious” and the sentence given to him was “correct”.

BBC News