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Harry Vaughan, 18, arrested by police during a probe into website Fascist Forge
Detectives found memory stick in his bedroom with details of 128 other accounts
Court documents say there was content linked to an American neo-Fascist book
Some was found on USB with Tiffin School in London logo, where Vaughan went

A former pupil at an elite grammar school has admitted downloading and distributing bomb-making manuals.

Harry Vaughan, 18, was arrested by police during a probe into a website named Fascist Forge, which calls itself a ‘home for the 21st century fascist’.

Detectives found a memory stick in his bedroom with details of 128 other internet accounts, including one for System Resistance Network, which supports white supremacy and attacks immigration and gay rights.

Court documents revealed there was also content linked to an American neo-Fascist book called Siege and neo-Nazi, anti-Semitic and Satanic material.

Some of it was found on a USB stick carrying the logo of Tiffin School, the grammar Vaughan had attended in Kingston, south-west London.

When he was arrested last June he was studying for A-levels in maths and computer science and was said to be among Tiffin’s best performing pupils.

The school, which counts former England cricket captain Alec Stewart among former pupils, accepts just 140 students a year from 1,300 applicants. It boasts that 85 per cent of its A-level grades are between A* and B.

Police discovered that in January last year, when Vaughan was just 16, he had published three images and a message on Fascist Forge that were intended to encourage terrorism.

He also published two links on the website to a publication called Wrong Hand: popular weapons manuals and their historic challenges to a democratic society.

Police discovered a wealth of terrorist material on his computers, including a manual with chapters on murder, rape, kidnap, arson and bombing.

He also had documents showing how to make ‘new and improved’ C-4 and Semtex plastic explosives and how to construct a homemade detonator.

Further searches of his electronic devices revealed he had downloaded two indecent photographs of children between April 13 and June 14, 2019.

Vaughan, who lives in Twickenham with his parents and two younger sisters, was charged on March 11 this year.

He appeared at Westminster Youth Court yesterday to plead guilty to 12 counts of possessing documents useful for terrorism, two counts of encouraging terrorism and two counts of possessing indecent images of children.

Addressing the teenager’s parents at the back of the court, chief magistrate Emma Arbuthnot said: ‘It is a nightmare situation for parents but it is important that you are here to support him.’ Vaughan will appear at the Old Bailey for sentencing on October 2.

His bail conditions state he is not permitted to delete the internet history on any digital device or to create a social media profile under any name other than his own.

He has to share his browsing history and passwords with police and may not share extreme Right-wing ideology.

And he is not allowed to possess or use any digital device capable of accessing the internet save for a nominated digital device and his family’s smart TV.

Daily Mail

A 30-year-old man who posted “vile and hateful” posts against Jews, Muslims, black and gay people on a Russian social media site has walked free from court.

Luke Crompton, of Brindle Street, Tyldesley, Wigan, pleaded guilty to encouraging terrorism recklessly by posting hundreds of messages over nine months in 2018 that were “dripping with hate and contempt” on VK – a site similar to Facebook.

Crompton, who was said to have a low IQ and possible autism, was handed a two-year community order at Manchester Crown Court after the judge heard that he did not harbour racist or homophobic views, and had been “influenced and exploited” online by “unscrupulous individuals”.

Alaric Bassano, prosecuting, told the court: “He posted extreme material – photographs, images and words – expressing hatred and contempt for, amongst others, homosexuals, Jews, Muslims and black people and those that consorted with them.”

He continued: “Many of the posts called for and encourage extreme activity against such people, such as the destruction of the Jewish and Islamic faiths, the torching of mosques and the murder of black people, Muslims and Jews.”

Mr Bassano said the VK profiles “prominently” displayed symbols of, and allegiance to, white supremacy.

The prosecutor added that Crompton appears to have harboured or sympathised with white supremacist views, with his Facebook “likes” featuring numerous causes of white supremacy, prolific viewing of material with racist and white supremacist title pages on his mobile phone and a draft text message containing pro-white nationalist and anti-Semitic sentiments.

But he told the court that all the experts who spoke to Crompton agreed that there was an “obsessional quality” to what he was doing and that his limitations, including social isolation and inability to form friendships and relationships, were likely to have played a part in his actions.

David Bentley QC, defending, described the posts as “hateful”, but said Crompton was “someone who is functioning effectively as a 10-year-old”.

He said the defendant was targeted on the Internet by people he believed had a genuine interest in him and was “adamant” he did not hold racist or homophobic views.

The barrister said: “He did not present as harbouring racist and offensive views and, in my opinion, would lack the intellect and sophistication to conceal them.”

He added: “He is plainly a vulnerable individual who was targeted online by unscrupulous individuals.”

Judge Patrick Field QC told Crompton: “What you did was to post vile and hateful material on a Russian social media site over a period of about nine months in 2018.

“The individual posts were deeply offensive, dripping with hate and contempt for Jews, Muslims and black people.

“They included praise for those who believed in white supremacy and they, in part, encouraged terrorism against Jews, Muslims and black people, encouraged people to kill them, to attack their religions and to burn their religious buildings.”

The judge added: “It is plain to me that you were influenced and exploited online by others who were considerably more sophisticated than you are.”

Sentencing Crompton to a two-year community order with a requirement of 30 rehabilitation days, Judge Field said: “I am advised, because of your vulnerability, you are liable to exploitation and radicalisation that might well occur in a prison environment and this would reduce the prospect of rehabilitation and increase the risk you pose to others.”

Crompton, who was wearing a dark-coloured coat and jeans, left the courtroom with his father and mother, who sobbed in the public gallery as the judge told her son he would not be jailed.

Lancashire Telegraph

Morgan Seales and Gabriele Longo held “extreme right-wing beliefs” the court heard

Two men who encouraged copycat terror attacks after shootings in New Zealand have been jailed.

Morgan Seales and Gabriele Longo discussed doing something similar to the attacks on mosques in Christchurch which claimed 51 lives in March.

They were convicted of encouraging terrorism and other offences after a trial at Leeds Crown Court.

Seales, from South Shields, was jailed for four years. Longo, from Crawley, West Sussex, was given a six-year term.

The court heard the pair published extreme right-wing statements encouraging terrorism on a WhatsApp group called Christian White Militia.

‘Despicable acts’

Counter-terror police arrested Seales, 20, from Turner Avenue, South Shields, shortly after the New Zealand attacks, when suspicions were raised about his online activities.

Longo, 26, of Burdock Close, Crawley, was arrested the following month after he was identified from Seales’ mobile phone records.

As well as encouraging terrorism, the pair were also found guilty of possessing material for terrorist purposes and collecting or making a record of information useful in the preparation of an act of terrorism.

Longo was also found guilty of disseminating terrorist publications.

The court was told Seales suffered from a personality disorder and had a “very difficult childhood” in which he battled anxiety and depression with the aid of children’s services but had “fallen through the net” of adult support services.

‘Threat to Muslims’

Judge Tom Bayliss QC said Longo was “something of an enigma” as little was known about him but he was satisfied he was “deeply radicalised”.

He added: “Both of you were in danger of indoctrinating others in that group chat. There were some very young people, some as young as 14.

“Your activity posed not only a threat to Muslims who were your potential victims but also a threat to everyone in our democratic society.”

After the sentencing hearing, Det Ch Supt Martin Snowden, head of counter terrorism policing north east, said “despicable acts” were encouraged under the “banner of right-wing ideology”.

He added: “It is apparent from the examination of both individuals’ mobile phones that they regularly participated in online chats and made postings that reflect their extreme beliefs, their beliefs developing and evolving over time through research and connecting with like-minded individuals.”

BBC News


Two men who came together online to promote their shared extreme right wing mind-set have today (Monday October 21) been found guilty of offences under the Terrorism Act.

26 year old Gabriele Longo of Burdock Close, Crawley and 20 year old Morgan Seales of Turner Avenue, South Shields, have both been found guilty of encouraging terrorism, possessing material for terrorist purposes and collecting or making a record of information useful in the preparation of an act of terrorism.

The jury at Leeds Crown Court also found Longo guilty of disseminating terrorist publications.

The arrests of Longo and Seales followed an investigation by Counter Terrorism Policing North East, supported by CTP South East, Northumbria and Sussex Police.

After concerns were raised about Seales’ online activity, he was arrested in March this year, and, following the granting of a warrant of further detention, was charged in April.

Following examination of Seales’ mobile phone, a further person (Longo) was identified as having posted concerning material online. As a result, Longo was arrested in early April and subsequently charged.

Detective Chief Superintendent Martin Snowden is Head of Counter Terrorism Policing North East. He said: “It is apparent from the examination of both individuals’ mobile phones that they regularly participated in online chats and made postings that reflect their extreme right wing beliefs, their beliefs developing and evolving over time through research and connecting with like-minded individuals.

“Longo also went as far as encouraging others to carry out despicable acts under the banner of the extreme right wing ideology.

“With the enduring terrorist threat, it is now more important than ever that everyone plays their part in tackling terrorism.

“Action Counters Terrorism (ACT) is encouraging communities across the country to help the police tackle terrorism and save lives by reporting suspicious behaviour and activity, including the posting and sharing of material of concern you may have seen online.

“Every day, officers from the Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit trawl the Internet, looking for extremist material but thousands of reports each year come from members of the public who flag up their concerns regarding online posts.

“If you see or hear something unusual or suspicious trust your instincts and ACT by reporting it in confidence at gov.uk/ACT or, in an emergency, dial 999.”

Longo and Seales will be sentenced on Wednesday, October 23.

Counter Terrorism Police

Michal Szewczuk produced propaganda for a neo-Nazi group called the Sonnenkrieg Division


A teenage neo-Nazi who suggested Prince Harry should be shot for marrying a woman of mixed race has pleaded guilty to terror offences at the Old Bailey.

Michal Szewczuk, 19, of Leeds, admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism and five of possessing documents useful to a terrorist.

The charges relate to a neo-Nazi group called the Sonnenkrieg Division.

Co-defendant Oskar Dunn-Koczorowski, 18, from west London, pleaded guilty in December to encouraging terrorism.

Both of them were granted conditional bail and are due to be sentenced at the Old Bailey on 17 June.

The pair produced Sonnenkrieg propaganda that, among other things, said Prince Harry was a “race traitor” who should be shot, and lionised the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik.

They publicised the propaganda on the social media site Gab, including on a page for the Sonnenkrieg group itself.

Szewczuk, hiding behind a pseudonym, also used a separate account to posts links to self-authored diatribes that called for the “systematic slaughtering” of women and the rape of babies.

Detectives found Szewczuk in possession of bomb-making instructions, documents describing how to conduct Islamist terror attacks and a “white resistance” manual.

The Sonnenkrieg group, which was exposed last year by a BBC investigation, was created as a British version of the American neo-Nazi organisation Atomwaffen Division, which has been linked to five murders.

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism in December

Szewczuk and Dunn-Koczorowski were arrested the morning after a BBC investigation exposed the group’s activities.

Another man was also arrested and has since been released under investigation.

The group’s ideology, which is influenced by figures such as the murderous cult leader Charles Manson, is a strain of neo-Nazism that openly encourages criminality and acts of terrorism.

Online propaganda and private chat logs show members engaging in extreme misogyny, as well as exalting Jihadist terrorism and a violent strand of Satanism.

Some private messages seen by the BBC suggest Sonnenkrieg members encouraged young women to engage in acts of self-harm.

The Sonnenkrieg Division grew out of a split in the now largely defunct System Resistance Network, which was created after the neo-Nazi group National Action was banned under anti-terror laws in 2016.

Sonnenkrieg and System Resistance Network both contained one-time members of National Action, including Dunn-Koczorowski.

BBC News

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism

A 17-year-old boy from west London has pleaded guilty to terror offences linked to the neo-Nazi group Sonnenkrieg Division.

Oskar Dunn-Koczorowki admitted two counts of encouraging terrorism.

He entered guilty pleas during an Old Bailey preliminary hearing.

A court order that prevented his identification was lifted by the judge.

He will be sentenced at a later date and will next appear on 25 February.

The charges state that in August this year Dunn-Koczorowki used accounts on the Gab social media site – including one for the Sonnenkrieg Division itself – to post material that would encourage others to prepare or engage in acts of terrorism.

He will be sentenced at a later date and will next appear the Old Bailey on 25 February 2019.

A co-defendant – Michael Szewczuk, 18, from Leeds – also appeared in court, but has not yet entered pleas.

Mr Szewczuk, a Polish national, is charged with five counts of encouraging terrorism and three of disseminating terrorist publications.

A provisional trial date was fixed for 13 May 2019 at Manchester Crown Court.

Both defendants were granted conditional bail.

BBC News