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James Forrest, aged 22, of Tilbury Grove, Leeds.

James Forrest, aged 22, of Tilbury Grove, Leeds.

A man who head-butted a British Transport Police (BTP) officer before racially abusing another official while drunk at Leeds Station during a Bank Holiday weekend has been jailed.

James Forrest, aged 22, of Tilbury Grove, Leeds, appeared before a West Yorkshire Magistrates’ court on October 5 and was handed an 18-week prison sentence.

Forrest was highly intoxicated at Leeds railway station and was acting in a highly anti-social manner shortly after 11pm on August 31.

A BTP officer on patrol at the station then approached Forrest and told him to leave.

But the defendant became aggressive and verbally abusive, calling officers “rats” and other derogatory terms.

As Forrest was being arrested for being drunk and disorderly, he then attacked the BTP officer by head-butting him.

When more officers were called to assist, Forrest “unleashed a torrent of verbal and racist abuse both at the station and at custody,” according to BTP.

He was caught on a body camera saying “I am racist and proud”, the force added.

Forrest pleaded guilty after he was charged with being drunk and disorderly, assaulting a constable in the execution of their duty, a racially aggravated public order offence and for failing to return from police bail.

As part of his sentence, Forrest was also ordered to pay a £115 victim surcharge.

Sergeant James Finch from BTP, said: “Forrest’s behaviour and language was completely disgusting and I am pleased the judge handed him a prison sentence. Not only did he racially abuse some of my officers, he also assaulted one of them by violently head-butting him.

“Thanks to the overwhelming evidence against Forrest, including body-worn footage, he was forced to plead guilty to the four charges.”

Yorkshire Post

Freddie Farnie, 25, and Karl Laslett, 24, were arrested for separate incidents

Two men have been convicted of being drunk and disorderly in Tunbridge Wells after England’s World Cup quarter-final win over Sweden.

Freddie Farnie, 25, and Karl Laslett, 24, were arrested for separate incidents in the town centre on July 7.

Both men were unrepresented when they appeared before Sevenoaks Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday (July 24).

Fruit farm worker Farnie, of Holmewood Road in High Brooms, pleaded guilty to being drunk and disorderly in a public place, as well as causing criminal damage to a property valued under £5,000.

Prosecution

Prosecuting, Debbie Jones, said: “On 7th July at 5pm, officers were deployed in Tunbridge Wells town centre to deal with any public order incidents, as there was World Cup football on.”

Officers were stationed outside the Opera House, when 10 people walked out.

Ms. Jones continued: “One was the defendant and he was standing in the road. He was asked to move and said ‘I can do what I f****** want, it’s a free country.'”

‘You can’t touch me’

Farnie reportedly also approached an officer and said: “You can’t touch me, that’s f****** assault,” before being pulled away by friends when police asked him to move.

Ms Jones continued: “He stood in the road shouting at another officer. The officer approached with the intention of arresting him but he ran off.”

A short while later, Farnie had made his way to The Barn on Mount Pleasant Road, where he was abusive to members of staff before being spotted hot-footing it back up the hill in the direction of the Trinity Theatre, the court heard.

The arrest

Ms Jones added: “Police made their way to York Road and detained the defendant and arrested him for being drunk and disorderly.”

While in his cell at Tonbridge police station in the early hours of July 8, the court heard how Farnie spat on the wall and at the CCTV camera, as well as tearing up the reading material and flushing it down the toilet.

Regarding his behaviour that evening, Farnie said: “It was a one off on that day because of the football. I used to have a few problems a few years ago but I’ve grown up a bit. It was just a bad day.”

Conditional discharge

Sentencing, magistrate Abigail Brennan said: “We are going to make a conditional discharge for 12 months. If you commit any offence, however, I will stress, any offence, then you will be brought back to court and not only with that offence but this will be put back again.

“You are required to pay £80 for a deep clean [of the cell], together with a victim surcharge of £20, plus £85 costs.”

Laslett

Also on that Saturday afternoon, Laslett, a labourer, who lives on Grange Road, was outside The Rose and Crown pub on Grosvenor Road.

Police attended the pub after they became aware of an altercation involving a group of males in the street.

Prosecuting, Debbie Jones said: “[Members of staff] went outside and informed police that [Laslett] had been refused service and been asked to leave.

“He said he was upset about being asked to leave, as he was banned from everywhere else in town.”

She added: “He went to the opera house [Wetherspoon’s] and caused further problems.

“At that point, the officers made the decision to arrest him.”

‘I wasn’t that drunk’

Laslett, who pleaded guilty to the charge of being drunk and disorderly, said: “To be fair I wasn’t that drunk because I was only in the cell for four hours.

“If I was that bad don’t you think I would have been in overnight?”

He added: “It was the World Cup on so there was around 1,000 people in town doing as I was and they chose me. That’s my luck isn’t it?”

Sentencing, Magistrate Brennan said: “We’re going to deal with this by way of a fine. The fine will be £160. You must pay costs of £85 and the victim surcharge will be £35.”

Kent Live

A 29-YEAR-OLD man who was trying to get taxi drivers to discuss his extremist views ended up being arrested when he failed to comply with a police request to move on.

Samuel Madden, of Lower Hollin Bank Street, Blackburn, pleaded guilty to being drunk and disorderly in Railway Road, Blackburn. He was fined £100 with £85 costs and £30 victim surcharge.

The court heard Madden had a can of beer in his hand when he was trying to engage the taxi drivers in a debate. He took exception when police took the can off him and became abusive.

Jonathan Taylor, defending, said his client realised he had been stupid.

“He didn’t take kindly to having his can taken off him,” said Mr Taylor. “He is a different person when he is in drink.”

Lancashire Telegraph

Peter Scotter. Credit: PA

Peter Scotter. Credit: PA

A man who became abusive to Sunderland paramedics who were trying to help him spat into a police officer’s eye in facing a jail sentence.

Peter Scotter, 55, carried out the act at Sunderland Royal Hospital – where he had been taken for treatment after being arrested, Sunderland magistrates heard.

Prosecutor Lesley Burgess said the incident started when police were called by the ambulance service at 6.20pm, on October 26, to Hendon Road, where Scotter was behaving aggressively.

As officers boarded the ambulance, they saw him sitting in a chair with a minor head injury.

Ms Burgess said there was a strong small of alcohol on Scotter and he seemed extremely drunk.

She said he then launched in to a torrent of abuse and – despite repeatedly being told to calm down – he continued his tirade and was arrested and taken to Southwick police station.

Ms Burgess said: “Due to the head injury he was then transported to Sunderland Royal Hospital.

“He was taken to a treatment room and appeared to calm down.

“He requested removal of the handcuffs but, after the nurses had left the room, he lunged forward and spat a mouthful of spit into the officer’s face.

“Some of this gone into the officer’s left eye.”

Scotter, of Beach Street, Sunderland, pleaded guilty being drunk and disorderly and assaulting a police officer.

Anna Haq, defending, said: “This incident in the hospital with the police officer. Mr Scotter is fully aware that, no doubt, you will be looking towards a custodial sentence in relation to this incident.

“Mr Scotter is ashamed of his behaviour and has no recollection of it.”

She added: “He’d had seven pints of alcohol but that would not put him into this state.

“He does not understand how he received his head injury.”

The case was adjourned for reports to be prepared and Scotter was told by the bench that they did not rule out custody.

He will be sentenced at South Tyneside Magistrates’ court on December 6.

Sunderland Echo

Jamie Ray, 26, was sentenced for a charge of drunk and disorderly after being arrested during EDL protest in June

A man who was arrested during an English Defence League protest has been given a 12-month conditional discharge.

Jamie Ray appeared at Teesside Magistrates’ Court on Wednesday, August 27, where he was sentenced for a charge of drunk and disorderly – an offence he was arrested for during an EDL protest in June.

The 26-year-old, of Park Road North, Middlesbrough, was also charged with two counts of failing to surrender to custody at court – on July 28 and July 23 – using threatening or abusive words or behaviour and possessing a Class B drug – both on July 9.

A charge of possessing a bladed article in a public place was withdrawn.

As previously reported about 350 people took part in a demonstration on Corporation Road, Middlesbrough town centre, while a further 150 people took part in a counter demonstration, both on June 28.

More than 300 police officers were involved in an operation during the march and counter demonstration, which had been planned for a number of months.

Ray was one of two men arrested on the day.

The other – Andrew David Johnson, 37, of Moorcock Close, Eston – previously pleaded guilty to being drunk and disorderly.

He was fined £35 and ordered to pay a £15 victim surcharge.

However, Ray initially failed to turn up to court following his arrest. A warrant without bail was then issued for his arrest.

Gazette Live

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A trio of men arrested in connection with a major national demonstration by a controversial far right-wing group in Exeter have appeared in court.

Kurtis Coyle, Daniel Holmes and Steven Hart were brought before Exeter Magistrates today following the English Defence League (EDL) march in the city on November 16.

Coyle, 21 from Heavitree, was given a suspended prison sentence of four weeks after he admitted the possession of a knuckle duster in the The Chevalier Inn, Fore Street as well as the possession of a class A drug.

He claimed he was planning to take the weapon “to a mate’s house” after apparently buying it online for £10, the court heard.

Coyle was ordered him to pay costs of £165, and was told the drugs – 1.4g of cocaine – would be destroyed.

Daniel Holmes, 30 from Exwick, issued no plea after being charged with the possession of a knife on Queen Street. He was granted unconditional bail and his case will be heard at Exeter Crown Court on January 3.

Steven Hart, 48, from the Pinhoe area of Exeter, was given a custodial discharge of six months after admitting being drunk in a public place.

Hart, who was described as a “long-term alcoholic”, was found lying down on a pavement under the influence of alcohol and unable to stand unassisted, the court heard.

A fourth man arrested – a 49-year-old Surrey man – had been given a fixed penalty notice for being drunk and disorderly in the city centre on November 15.

Chief Inspector Jim Gales, of Devon and Cornwall Police, described the day as a “success” for the force.

“We had to intervene at times to prevent outbreaks of disorder, making a very small number of arrests,” he said.

“But what we [were] able to do [was] to facilitate peaceful demonstrations and allow the inhabitants of Exeter to go about their daily business safely.”

More than 200 people travelled from across the country for the EDL march and rally in the city centre.

But a total of 1,000 people, under the banner of Exeter Together, paraded down the streets earlier in the day and gathered for a rally to condemn the group.

A mounted police unit from South Wales were among a total of 400 officers from as far away as Birmingham who were tasked with patrolling activities.

City centre manager John Harvey described the police operation as “excellent”, saying the force ensured it remained “business as normal”.

“It could have been a day that tarnished the city, but actually it enhanced its reputation. On lots of levels, we can be very proud,” he added.

Some 225 EDL supporters gathered at the Locomotive pub on New North Road before marching along the road, down Queen Street to Rougemont Gardens flanked by police.

Angry exchanges took place between opponents and protestors who chanted “You’re English no more” and “whose streets, our streets” as they marched.

Two protestors donned burqas – traditional Islamic dress – and were seen to imitate Muslim prayer in the middle of a street.

Exeter News & Echo